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Volume Editors: Radhika Iyengar and Christina T. Kwauk
The global education community, guided for decades by the concept of Education for Sustainable Development, has done little to support the radical transformation of education systems needed to respond to climate change. Part of this inertia rests in five roadblocks to quality education identified in a Brookings report, and about which stakeholders from the fields of ESD, GCED, GE, and HR education came together in April 2020 to begin discussing ways of addressing.

This edited volume picks up that conversation by laying out elements of a shared vision, or roadmap, for the global education sector in climate action. The volume includes perspectives that span multiple continents, disciplines, and positionalities within the education system – from policymakers to teachers to youth. It curates exiting literature, surfaces in-depth case studies, and presents overviews of conceptual frameworks on a diverse range of topics relating to systems transformation, monitoring and accountability mechanisms, lessons from the field, teacher support, as well as activism and advocacy by students.

Curriculum and Learning for Climate Action: Toward an SDG 4.7 Roadmap for Systems Change offers researchers, practitioners, donors, and decisionmakers insights into entry points for education systems change needed to reorient our relationship with our planetary systems.
Author: Mitch Bleier
Schooling, the most ubiquitous species of formal educational practice, removes learners from the world in which they exist and places them in contrived environments in order to educate them for the world in which they will work, play, and engage in other forms of cultural production for the rest of their time on Earth. While this arrangement seems to work for some, particularly those in academia and policymaking (who make decisions about educating others), it serves many of us somewhat less satisfactorily. This book documents the ongoing journey of a young cheese professional as she navigates the worlds of formal and informal education and the craft and art of cheesemaking. Her self-education is examined as she appropriates available resources in the service of constructing a professional learning program in the world and on the job. As she both succeeds and bumps up against obstacles in the pursuit of a life and a future in uncharted territory, we explore her being and becoming a professional cheesemaker, affineur and cheesemonger.
A parallel story of an emerging educational researcher is examined as he partners with the cheese professional, propelling both of their stories into uncharted territory.
Chapter 7 Beyond Truth

Abstract

This chapter is focused on adult professional learning in healthcare by focusing on an innovative narrative-based training platform for seniors that uses transformative learning theory to better support person-centered healthcare. It is suggested that adopting the theoretical framing of pragmatism can support professionals to move beyond dualistic thinking with respect to medical knowledge and the lived experiences of patients. Adopting a pragmatist perspective in this sense can therefore have practical consequences that supports the over-arching aims of the training, which is to move professionals from categorical to cognizant thinking.

It is suggested that the tenets of pragmatism offer adult learners a highly practical set of concepts that could support interpretive, narrative-based learning and more particularly the likelihood of transformative learning. Considering knowledge in action and for use, dialogue based on a pragmatist approach can facilitate the opportunity for narrative knowledge that broadens the conception of what knowledge itself it. This is reassuring the healthcare practitioner in how connected meaning frames are with many aspects of lived experience, and how complex, drawing on multiple levels of micro, meso and macro. Such a connection between research, theory and practice can facilitate a better ecology of learning in this area.

Open Access
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Chapter 2 Biographical Interviews and the Micro Context of Biographicity
Author: Rob Evans

Abstract

The chapter examines the capacity of the biographical/life history interview for understanding closely heard talk in interaction. The chapter seeks to question how the emergence and sharing of biographical discourse in interview talk may be identified and described; what evidence is found in interview talk of biographical self or ‘biographicity’, a concept derived from , ); what is the relation between language and voice in a biographical narrative, with particular reference to the notions of ‘synthesis’ () and ‘verbalisation’ (). To do this, the author presents experiences related and shared in the micro context of interview interaction and for this purpose, a section of a biographical narrative of a Polish teacher is introduced and discussed. The private history of the teacher Daria is understood as biographised talk, which is structured both temporally and sequentially. Through the changing interaction between Daria and the researcher and through the wider out-of-frame interaction of both with their respective social worlds, it can be seen that strong elements of interdiscursivity and insight into wider ecologies of learning and living enrich the work of meaning-making that learning biographies represent.

Open Access
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Chapter 4 Biographical Research at the Boundary
Author: Kjetil Moen

Abstract

Death is an intrinsic part of the ecology of life. Yet in Western societies, end-of-life care has to a large degree moved out of the home and into institutions. A pressing question for educational institutions and employing healthcare organizations is how to train for and facilitate quality and resilience among those working at the boundary between life and death. Any such endeavor must rest on knowledge about how encounters with the death of others inform the self-understanding and praxis of end-of-life care professionals.

Applying a biographical narrative approach to the narrative accounts of healthcare workers from palliative care and intensive care units, the chapter undertakes a careful reading of free-associative narratives, in order to elicit the entangled relation between the subject and his or her contexts, past and present. The chapter is thus an empirically based exploration of how the individual’s fear of death (micro), organizational feeling rules (meso), and societal discourse (macro) simultaneously and mutually inform the life and narrative of the end-of-life care professionals.

Open Access
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Part 2 Dialogue in Learning Together, and Its Distress
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Part 1 Discourses of Ecology and Learning
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Part 3 Diversity as a Content and as a Feature of Biographic Enquiry
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Chapter 6 Dynamic Ecologies of Person and Place

Abstract

In this chapter I explore the intersectional ecology (both physical and discursive) of dialogic ethnographic research and place. I suggest that agency is not located entirely within individual action, but is generated within an intertwined material/collective relationship within a lived ecology. For my theoretical framework I draw from Bourdieu’s notion of habitus and place, Barad’s theory of posthumanist performativity, and finally my and Norris’s conception of duoethnography. I provide one illustrative example, a duoethnography (more specifically a trioethnography) of place walking around a college campus. Vonzell Agosto, Travis Marn, and Rica Ramirez conducted their trioethnography as they “place walked” around their college campus, encountering a landscape actively imbued with symbolic power. Through conversation and movement, they explored the symbolic codes mediating thought and action within their space. Their study made the invisible, visible and the symbolic, concrete. Furthermore, their study was a meaningful context for their own growth: it facilitated a reflexive change in their stance and engagement on their campus. And finally, I suggest that their study itself became a public pedagogy of resistance.

Open Access
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research
Conclusion An Evolution of Ideas
Open Access
In: Discourses, Dialogue and Diversity in Biographical Research