Ein interkultureller Vergleich zwischen dem Philanthropinum in Dessau und dem Colegio de las Vizcaínas in Mexiko-Stadt
Author: Eva Rautenberg
Aufklärung und Schule, Männer und Frauen in Dessau und in Mexiko. Eine kulturhistorische Betrachtung und Darstellung einer facettenreichen und vielfältigen Wirklichkeit.
Thematisiert werden Szenen des Alltags und des Schullebens, die in zwei verschiedenen westlichen Kontexten zur Zeit der Aufklärung stattfanden: Dessau und Neuspanien bzw. das koloniale Mexiko. In dieser Ausführung zeigen sich die Macht- und Herrschaftsverhältnisse, die sowohl innerhalb der politischen Kontrolle als auch im Bereich des Akademischen ausgeübt wurden. Das Werk versteht sich als ein alternativer methodologischer Ansatz für die Vergleichende Pädagogik.
Zur Kritik materialistischer Bildungstheorie und -praxis
Author: Roger Behrens
Editor: Ralf Koerrenz
Die Debatten über Bildung und Erziehung sowie deren Sinn und Zweck haben Konjunktur. Obwohl unter einem allgemeinen Vorzeichen der Kritik stehend, spielt eine materialistische Bildungstheorie und -praxis in diesen Debatten keine Rolle mehr.
Noch in den 1970er Jahren gingen von der kritischen Theorie der Bildung, Erziehung und Pädagogik entscheidende Impulse aus; mit kritischen Konzepten wie »materialistische Bildungstheorie« oder »dialektische Pädagogik« konnte das humanistische Bildungsideal auch praktisch aktualisiert werden (antiautoritäre Erziehung, Kinderladenbewegung, freie Schulen etc.). Allerdings sind solche gesellschaftlichen Interventionen heute restlos integriert, die kritischen Motive weitgehend absorbiert, entschärft oder schlechterdings vergessen. Eingebettet in eine kritische Begriffs- und Gesellschaftsanalyse rekonstruiert die Studie historisch und systematisch dieses »Scheitern«, beleuchtet aber auch das »Machbare« einer materialistischen Bildungstheorie und -praxis.
Author: Ralf Koerrenz
Editor: Ralf Koerrenz
Es gibt eine spezifisch hebräische Kultur der Bildung – das ist der Leitgedanke dieser Grundlegung. In dieser Kultur der Bildung spielt neben Aspekten wie Freiheit und Individualität ein bestimmtes Verständnis der Verantwortung des Menschen gegenüber sich selbst, der Mitwelt und der Umwelt eine entscheidende Rolle.
Dabei wird der Mensch als ein Wesen verstanden, das von der unaufhebbaren Gleichzeitigkeit von Entfremdung (Sünde) und Freiheit (als Befreiung) geprägt ist. Mit »hebräisch« wird dabei ein kultureller Überlieferungskontext bezeichnet, der sich in den Schriften der hebräischen Bibel gebündelt hat. Schöpfung und Sündenfall, Befreiung und prophetische Kulturkritik werden mit Blick auf das Bildungsmotiv anthropologisch ausgedeutet. Insgesamt entfaltet der Hebräische Humanismus nicht nur ein Verständnis von Kultur und Bildung, sondern kann insgesamt als eine bestimmte Ausprägung einer Kultur der Bildung verstanden werden. Der Hebräische Humanismus bildet die gemeinsame Grundlage für entsprechende Strömungen im Judentum, Christentum und Islam.
Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology
In Introduction to Africana Demography: Lessons from Founders E. Franklin Frazier, W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Atlanta School of Sociology scholars from across the country wed Black Sociology with critical demography within an Africana Demography framework. Contributors speak to innovative ways to address pressing issues and have the added benefit of affording many of the scholars denied their rightful place in the sociological and demographic canons. Specifically, the book includes an introduction outlining Africana demography and chapters that provide a critique of conventional demographic approaches to understanding race and social institutions, such as the family, religion, and the criminal justice system.


Contributors include: Lori Latrice Martin, Anthony Hill, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Maretta McDonald, Weldon McWilliams, Jack S. Monell, Edward Muhammad, Brianne Painia, Tifanie Pulley, David I. Rudder, Jas M. Sullivan, Arthur Whaley, and Deadric Williams.
Based on a multi-year ethnography in one Spanish-speaking community in New Jersey, this book is a meticulous account of six Mexican families that explores the relationship between siblings’ language use patterns, practices, and ideologies. Combining insights gained from language socialization and heritage language studies within the larger field of sociolinguistics, the book’s findings examine siblings’ sociolinguistic environments and the ways in which these Latino children use and view their multilingual resources in the home, school, and broader community. This study emphasizes the links between siblings’ language ideologies, agentive decision making, and linguistic patterns, and the ways in which birth order influences the different dimensions of heritage language maintenance in the U.S..
Author: Beth L. Hewett
In A Scholarly Edition of Samuel P. Newman’s A Practical System of Rhetoric, Beth L. Hewett argues that Newman, an American nineteenth-century rhetorician, has been unfairly judged by criteria disconnected from his goals and accomplishments. His exceptionally popular textbook is important for how he engaged received theory, fit practice to the era, struggled with age-old questions of thought and language, and spoke to his readers. He operationalized the concept of taste, giving it functionality for invention, and inflected Belletrism with American illustrations suited to the nascent, uniquely American communicative requirements of a democracy. Hewett’s modern scholarly edition contextualizes this book as the serious work of a scholar-educator, demonstrating its values in the context of nineteenth-century American rhetorical and textbook history.
An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Visual Literacy
Editor: Julia Lane
Tracing Behind the Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Visual Literacy, discusses how our relationship to images, collectively and individually, is constantly shifting, as we adapt to the evolving image economy of our increasingly screen-based world. This volume offers pedagogies, analyses and strategies for developing visual literacy across education and industry.

The language of images embodies highly complex and nuanced statements and readings, the ability to invent and reinvent, it is bursting with opportunities to be lyrical, satirical, rhetorical, to unravel meanings, and to pose as many questions as it answers. It is a language of investigation and experimentation, it both constructs and shatters cultural expectations, and is constantly and rapidly transforming as forced by current social and political climates.
Thinking about Education in the Hebrew Tradition
The Lost Mirror traces cultural patterns in which the interpretation of learning and education was developed against the backdrop of Hebrew thought.

The appreciation of learning is deeply rooted in the Hebrew way of thinking. Learning is understood as an open and history-conscious engagement of man with culture. The consciousness of history is shaped by the motif of the unavailability of the “other” and the difference to this “other”. This “other” is traditionally remembered as “God”, but may also be reflected in the motifs of the other person or the other society. The Lost Mirror reminds us
of a deficit, which is that in our everyday thinking and everyday action, we usually hide, forget and partly suppress the meaning and presence of the unavailable other. The book approaches this thinking through portraits of people such as Hannah Arendt, Leo Baeck, Walter Benjamin, Agnes Heller, Emanuel Levinas, and others.
From the 16th through to the 18th century, printed disputations were the main academic output of universities. This genre is especially attractive as it deals with the most significant cultural and scientific innovations of the early modern period, such as the printing revolution and the development of new methods in philosophy, education and scholarly exchange via personal networks.
Until recently, academic disputations have attracted comparatively little scholarly attention. This volume provides for the first time a comprehensive study of the early modern disputation culture, both through theoretical discussions and overviews, and numerous case studies that analyze particular features of disputations in various European regions.
Artful Works and Dialogue about 'Art as Experience'
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Christina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.