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Cultures of Uneven and Combined Development seeks to explore and develop Leon Trotsky’s concept of uneven and combined development. In particular, it aims to adapt the political and historical analysis which originated in Trotsky’s Russia for use within the contemporary field of world literature. As such, it draws together the work of scholars from both the field of international relations and the field of literature and the arts. This collection will therefore be of particular interest to anyone who is interested in new ways of understanding world literary texts, or interested in new ways of applying Trotsky’s revolutionary politics to the contemporary world order.

Contributors: Alexander Anievas, Gail Day, James Christie, Kamran Matin, Kerem Nisancioglu, Luke Cooper, Michael Niblett, Neil Davidson, Nesrin Degirmencioglu, Robert Spencer, Steve Edwards.
Pour une démystification de l’Affaire Vernon Sullivan
Author: Clara Sitbon
Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax : pour une démystification de l’Affaire Vernon Sullivan propose la première véritable théorie du canular, ou hoax littéraire : Qu’est-ce qu’un hoax littéraire ? Comment se manifeste-t-il ? Quelles en sont les conséquences sur la fonction de l’auteur ?
S’inspirant de grands théoriciens de la littérature tels Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault ou Jacques Derrida, Clara Sitbon applique sa toute nouvelle théorie des hoaxes littéraires à des exemples tirés des littératures française, britannique et australienne et, ce faisant, parvient à établir la première typologie des hoaxes. Plus précisément, à travers une analyse détaillée de l’Affaire Boris Vian/Vernon Sullivan (1946-1950) comme fil rouge, Clara Sitbon démontre habilement que le hoax littéraire peut être un outil d’analyse littéraire de qualité. Plus important encore, elle prouve que les auteurs pseudonymes, ces compagnons d’infortunes de leurs créateurs ont, eux aussi, une légitimité littéraire.

Boris Vian, faiseur de hoax : pour une démystification de l’Affaire Vernon Sullivan offers the first comprehensive theory of literary hoaxes: What are they? How can recognise them? How do they work? What are their consequences on the notion of authorship?
Drawing on literary theorists such as Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida, Clara Sitbon applies her theory to a range of hoaxes in French, British and Australian literatures, thereby providing a detailed typology of hoaxes. More particularly, through detailed analysis of the Boris Vian/Vernon Sullivan Affair (France, 1946-1950) as a case study for her theory, Clara Sitbon cleverly demonstrates that the literary hoax can indeed be a useful analytical tool in literary criticism. More importantly, she proves that pseudonymous authors can indeed have a literary legitimacy.
Volume Editors: Dagmar Vandebosch and Theo D'haen
Goethe in 1827 famously claimed that national literatures did not mean very much anymore, and that the epoch of world literature was at hand. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, in the so-called "transnational turn" in literary studies, interest in world literature, and in how texts move beyond national or linguistic boundaries, has peaked. The authors of the 18 articles making up Literary Transnationalism(s) reflect on how literary texts move between cultures via translation, adaptation, and intertextual referencing, thus entering the field of world literature. The texts and subjects treated range from Caribbean, American, and Latin American literature to European migrant literatures, from the uses of pseudo-translations to the organizing principles of world histories of literature, from the dissemination of knowledge in the middle ages to circulation of literary journals and series in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Contributors include, amongst others, Jean Bessière, Johan Callens, Reindert Dhondt, César Domínguez, Erica Durante, Ottmar Ette, Kathleen Gyssels, Reine Meylaerts, and Djelal Kadir. Authors discussed comprise, amongst others, Carlos Fuentes, Ernest Hemingway, Edouard Glissant.

Since the tumultuous events of 1989/1990, writers, cultural practitioners and academics have responded to, reconstructed and reflected upon the process and enduring impact of German reunification. This bilingual volume provides a nuanced understanding of the literature and culture of the GDR and its legacy today. It explores a broad range of genres, combines perspectives on both lesser-known and more established writers, and juxtaposes academic articles with the personal reflections of those who directly experienced and engaged with the GDR from within or beyond its borders. Whether creative practitioners or academics, contributors consider the broader literary and intellectual contexts and traditions shaping GDR literature and culture in a way that enriches our understanding of reunification and its legacy.

Contributors are: Deirdre Byrnes, Anna Chiarloni, Jean E. Conacher, Sabine Egger, Robert Gillett, Frank Thomas Grub, Jochen Hennig, Nick Hodgin, Frank Hörnigk, Therese Hörnigk, Gisela Holfter, Jeannine Jud, Astrid Köhler, Marieke Krajenbrink, Hannes Krauss, Reinhard Kuhnert, Katja Lange-Müller, Corina Löwe, Hugh Ridley, Kathrin Schmidt.

Abstract

Arguably one of those to engage most intensely and personally with the events of autumn 1989 was the GDR mathematician and writer, Helga Königsdorf (1938–2014), not least in 1989 oder Ein Moment Schönheit, her collage of letters, poems and texts published in 1990, where she seeks to represent, and engage critically and honestly with, the myriad of thoughts, emotions and experiences generated by the Wende, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the ultimate move towards the dissolution of the GDR. In the foreword to her collection, the author argues for an appreciation of the uniqueness of the mo­­ment, of the human experience and the creativity it fosters; all these, she recognises, will inevitably be lost in future renderings of events: “Die nach uns kommen, werden die Ereignisse historisch betrachten. Sie werden ihn suchen, den roten Faden durch das Geäst der Zeit. Aber was sie finden, wird nicht das Eigentliche sein” (p. 5). Within this chapter, I explore how Königsdorf configures her collage and some of the themes she raises therein: self-expression and creativity, artistic freedom and responsibility, celebration and mourning, human dignity and reason – and I argue that, in its conscious juxtaposition of text-types and themes, the very genre of “collage” both challenges the normative historiography of events Königsdorf predicts and simultaneously represents in itself a creative historiography predicated on individual experience.


In: German Reunification and the Legacy of GDR Literature and Culture