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Volume Editors: Tamara Nair and Maria Inês Amaro
Citizenship is one of the most important legacies of human development. It raises the human status from a biological condition into a cultural, moral, political and rationalistic one. It is a constantly evolving process, which at each new turn, adds complexity to human existence.
After the breakthroughs of the eighteenth century, with the first steps in recognition of civil and political rights, and of the twentieth century with the advancement of social rights and the emergence of cultural and environmental rights, one could conclude that the twenty-first century would see an enlargement of citizenship ideas and ideals. Has this indeed happened? Where are we now when it comes to identifying ourselves as citizens?
This book was written while some of the most significant events of the last few years were happening. Varying across several disciplines, this volume addresses the complexities of citizenship and our attempts to make sense of them.
Editors: Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan
In Equality and Anti-Discrimination: The Road to Equal Rights in China, Professors Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan collect experienced scholars in the field of anti-discrimination law to conduct deep discussions on the manifestations, causes, and solutions of discrimination issues in China. Since the reform and opening up in China, the government has loosened its governance, and the market economy and civil society have developed. However, many economic and social discriminations have also emerged and caused widespread social contradictions and legal dilemmas. In this book, equality rights and discrimination issues are investigated in a panoramic way from the perspective of law, and .insightful suggestions are made.
The authors believe that anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of Chinese law are carried out simultaneously with political changes and economic development. In this process, experts and scholars, public media, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations play important roles. The awakening of civil rights awareness and the emergence of rights protection actions for vulnerable groups are the sources of anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of law.
With over 40 million people still enslaved around the world, this book takes a closer look at the role of culture in society and how certain practices, beliefs or behaviors may be fuelling human trafficking beyond what the law can curtail. The study reveals cultural elements that conflict with existing anti-human trafficking laws across three case studies (United States, India and Costa Rica). There is no simple answer or a single solution to stop or significantly reduce the crime, but a pragmatic, multi-disciplinary, and human rights approach to the problem may bring to light that, efforts to curtail human trafficking will be in vain if we rely on law alone. A fundamental shift in culture is imperative.
During the Covid-19 pandemic, the home as a workplace became a widely discussed topic. However, for almost 300 million workers around the world, paid work from home was not news. A Factory in the Living Room includes contributions from scholars, activists and artists addressing the past and present conditions of home-based work. They discuss the institutional and legal histories of regulations for these workers, their modes of organization and resistance, as well as providing new insights on contemporary home-based work in both traditional and developing sectors.

Contributors are: Jane Barrett, Janine Berg, Eloisa Betti, Chris Bonner, Eileen Boris, Patricia Coñoman Carrilo, Janhavi Dave, Saniye Dedeoğlu, Laura K Ekholm, Jenna Harvey, Frida Hållander, K. Kalpana, Srabani Maitra, Indrani Mazumdar, Gabriela Mitidieri, Silke Neunsinger, Malin Nilsson, Narumol Nirathron, Åsa Norman, Leda Papastefanaki, Archana Prasad, Maria Tamboukou, Nina Trige Andersen, and Marlese von Broembsen.
War crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and the crime of aggression (so-called ‘core crimes’) often could not be committed without financial assistance. This book examines the basis for individual criminal liability under international law for persons who finance core crimes. Despite the need for clear rules, neither international courts nor scholars agree upon whether or not, or under what circumstances, such liability exists.
To determine the minimum standard of liability, this work analyses the legal rules relating to complicity, both under international criminal law and domestically in twenty selected jurisdictions in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, North America and Oceania. The aim of these analyses is to determine whether there are general principles of law recognised by the community of States regarding the minimum standard of liability for aiders and abettors.
This book proposes a comparative framework for assessing legal rules relating to complicity, and it advances a normative claim as to how legal rules should be structured concerning the criminal responsibility of individuals who finance the commission of core crimes.
The analysis of the applicable international law and the comparative analysis of national jurisdictions lead to the conclusion that, currently, the minimum standard of knowledge for aiding and abetting is active knowledge. However, the author argues that this standard should be revised to include wilful blindness. Regarding the intent requirement, the analyses find that dolus eventualis is included in the definition of intent.
Building on her earlier work, Law and Literature, María José Falcón y Tella’s new study takes a fresh look at the law in the works of two of the greatest authors in world literature: Cervantes and Shakespeare. In doing so, she examines subjects as wide-ranging as individual rights and freedoms, government and the administration of justice, criminal law, civil law, labor law, commercial law, and the treatment of mental illness, among others.
This original and thought-provoking volume offers readers insight into the law “as” literature and the law “in” literature through the prism of masterpieces such as Don Quixote and Hamlet.
This book comprehensively covers the entire scope of conflicting rights and duties of the fighting parties and international humanitarian relief actors in non-international armed conflicts, namely from the moment of the initiation of international humanitarian relief actions till their authorisation and throughout the consecutive stages of the delivery of relief. From the practice of frontline humanitarian negotiations, this book reconceptualizes how those rights and duties are coming into being and how compliance with agreements on humanitarian access and other international humanitarian law and international human rights norms can be ensured and/or their normativity can be strengthened.