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This volume places the satirical works of the Middle Byzantine period in a wider political and socio-cultural context, exploring not only their various forms but also their functions and meanings. The volume is divided into four parts. The first part provides the backgrounds of the authors and texts discussed in the volume. The second concerns the manifold functions and appearances of Byzantine satirical texts. Part three offers detailed analyses of three largely unexplored texts (the Charidemos, the Philopatris, and the Anacharsis). The last section moves from the individual texts to the larger picture of satirical modes in Middle Byzantium.

Contributors are Baukje van den Berg, Floris Bernard, Stavroula Constantinou, Eric Cullhed, Janek Kucharski, Markéta Kulhánková, Paul Magdalino, Henry Maguire, Przemysław Marciniak, Charis Messis, Ingela Nilsson, Emilie van Opstall, Panagiotis Roilos, and Nikos Zagklas.

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The Reception of Aeschylus' Plays through Shifting Models and Frontiers addresses the need for an integrated approach to the study and staging of Aeschylus’ plays. It offers an invigorating discussion about the transmission and reception of his plays and explores the interrelated tasks of editing, translating, adapting and remaking them for the page and the stage. The volume seeks to reshape current debates about the place of his tragedies in the curriculum and the repertory in a scholarly manner that is accessible and innovative. Each chapter makes a significant and original contribution to its selected topic, but the collective strength of the volume rests on its simultaneous appeal to readers in theatre studies, classical studies, performance studies, comparative studies, translation studies, adaptation studies, and, naturally, reception studies.
Volume Editors: Jessica Priestley and Vasiliki Zali
Brill's Companion to the Reception of Herodotus in Antiquity and Beyond offers new insights on the reception and cultural transmission of one of the most controversial and influential texts to have survived from Classical Antiquity. Herodotus’ Histories has been adopted, adapted, imitated, contested, admired and criticized across diverse genres, historical periods, and geographical boundaries. This companion, edited by Jessica Priestley and Vasiliki Zali, examines the reception of Herodotus in a range of cultural contexts, from the fifth century BC to the twentieth century AD. The essays consider key topics such as Herodotus' place in the Western historiographical tradition, translation of and scholarly engagement with the Histories, and the use of the Histories as a model for describing and interpreting cultural and geographical material.