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This is the first English written book that includes the most significant opinions of Judge Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque (European Court of Human Rights). Judge Pinto de Albuquerque was the Vice-president of Section IV and President of the Committee on the Rules of the Court. As Full Professor at the Faculty of Law of the Catholic University of Lisbon, he has published, inter alia, fifteen books in different languages and more than fifty journal articles.

Since his appointment as a Judge in Strasbourg, Professor Pinto de Albuquerque has authored more than 150 opinions that have significantly contributed to the development of international human rights law. The Judge’s decisions are regularly cited by academic scholars and practitioners in human rights law, public international law, criminal law, migration law, and refugee law.
Founded in 1993, the African Yearbook, now published under the auspices of the African Foundation for International Law, is the only scholarly publication devoted exclusively to the study, development, dissemination and wider appreciation of international law in Africa as a whole.

Through the study and analysis of emerging legal issues of particular relevance to Africa, such as the creation of viable continental institutions capable of promoting unity and security for the peoples of the continent, the effective protection of human rights, the need for accountability for mass killings and massive violations of the rule of law, the promotion of a rule-based democratic culture, the role of African countries in a globalizing world economy and in international trade relations, the Yearbook strives to be responsive to the intellectual needs of African countries in the area of international law, and to the continuing struggle for creating an environment conducive to the rule of law throughout the continent
Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of the African Yearbook of International Law.
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. Each volume of the Review includes general articles, current developments, and the comprehensive annual digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews and shorter book notes. Volume 23 covers 2018 and features ten stories of international law spanning across the last century.
Editor-in-Chief: Ineta Ziemele
The Baltic Yearbook of International Law ‒ the first legal journal in the field and subfields of international law ‒ is published under the auspices of the Baltic Editorial Board. The Yearbook aims to bring to international debate issues of importance in the Baltic States, providing a forum for views on topical international law themes from both Baltic and international scholars. The first volume appeared in 2001 with a symposium on the question of the international legal status of the Baltic States.

The Yearbook contains state practice reports from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, thus serving as an important source of international law that is unavailable elsewhere. From time to time the Yearbook offers articles discussing the history of international law and current issues in Eastern Europe and the Russian Federation, thus making regional discourse more accessible to a wider global audience.

Volume 18 is the second volume of the Baltic Yearbook of International Law appearing under the aegis of cooperation between the Riga Graduate School of Law and Brill/Nijhoff Publishers. This volume is devoted to highlighting the reflections aired in Riga when the Law School was implementing the Jean Monnet Project in 2017-2019. These reflections broadly focused on the law of the European Union.

The editors of the Baltic Yearbook are certain that the EU-law perspective will be of interest to international lawyers throughout the world, whether as an option or as an idea as to what the international legal order might look like with ever growing globalization and migration of the world’s people.
Editor: Ying-jeou Ma
Volume 37 of the Chinese (Taiwan) Yearbook of International Law and Affairs publishes scholarly articles and essays on international and comparative law, as well as compiles official documents on the state practice of the Republic of China (ROC) in 2019. The Yearbook publishes on multi-disciplinary topics with a focus on international and comparative law issues regarding Taiwan, Mainland China and the Asia-Pacific.
Author: J. Ashley Roach
State practice in the law of the sea has continued to evolve since publication of the 3rd edition of Excessive Maritime Claims in 2012. In this 4th edition, J. Ashley Roach has brought the text up to date, particularly as to the provisions relating to the balance of navigational rights and freedoms with the interests of coastal and island States. Of particular interest are the more detailed explanations of the phrase “freedom of navigation”; the expanded material on baselines and on the practice of archipelagic States, the revisions of the material on the continental shelf, on marine data collection, on submarine cables and pipelines, and US Ocean Policy. A new chapter has been added on islands and other maritime features.

This edition is dedicated to Dr. Robert W. Smith, the premier marine geographer.
Author: Peter Kempees
The European Convention on Human Rights is now crucial to decisions to be taken by the military and their political leaders in ‘hard power’ situations – that is, classical international and non-international armed conflict, belligerent occupation, peacekeeping and peace-enforcing and anti-terrorism and anti-piracy operations, but also hybrid warfare, cyber-attack and targeted assassination. Guidance is needed, therefore, on how Convention law relates to these decisions.

That guidance is precisely what this book aims to offer. It focuses primarily on States’ accountability under the Convention, but also shows that human rights law, used creatively, can actually help States achieve their objectives.
When can a state give political support to a military intervention in another state? The Government of the Netherlands commissioned an Expert Group to examine this complex, topical and time-sensitive question and to consider whether it should press for international acceptance of humanitarian intervention as a new legal basis for the use of force between states in exceptional circumstances. This volume is the result of those efforts. The Expert Group was led by Professor Cyrille Fijjnaut and consisted of Mr. Kristian Fischer, Professor Terry Gill, Professor Larissa van den Herik, Professor Martti Koskenniemi, Professor Claus Kreß, Mr. Robert Serry, Ms. Monika Sie Dhian Ho, Ms. Elizabeth Wilmshurst and Professor Rob de Wijk. Their thorough analysis and recommendations offer important insights that can aid governments in formulating a position on political support for the use of force between states and humanitarian intervention. The volume also constitutes a useful tool for scholars and practitioners in considering these difficult and important issues.