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Author: Noël Carroll
For over thirty years, Arthur Danto was the most important art critic and philosopher of art and aesthetics in the English-speaking world. Arthur Danto's Philosophy of Art: Essays provides a comprehensive and systematic view of his philosophy and criticism by Noël Carroll, Distinguished Professor of the Philosophy of Art, CUNY and himself a former journalist specializing in arts criticism. Danto's writings attracted and still attracts diverse audiences, including aestheticians, artists, art critics, historians, and art lovers. In this book they will find his major themes not only analyzed in depth but also discussions of his political significance, views on history, cinema and more.
Author: Gino Zaccaria
In this book, Gino Zaccaria offers a philosophical meditation on the issue of art in light of its originary sense. He shows how this sense can be fully understood provided that our thinking, on the one hand, returns to the ancient Greek world where it must heed the voice and hints of the goddess Athena, and, on the other hand, listens to “artist-thinkers” close to our current epoch, such as Cézanne, van Gogh and Boccioni. Indeed, the path of this meditation has as its guide the well-known sentence by the painter from Aix-en-Provence, which reads: “Je vous dois la vérité en peinture, et je vous la dirai !”. What will finally appear in this way will not be an abstract or historical notion of art, but its enigma; that is to say, the promise of “another initiation” of art itself.
Volume Editor: Josefa Ros Velasco
The Culture of Boredom is a collection of essays by well-known specialists reflecting from philosophical, literary, and artistic perspectives, in which the reader will learn how different disciplines can throw light on such an appealing, challenging, yet still not fully understood, phenomenon. The goal is to clarify the background of boredom, and to explore its representation through forgotten cross-cutting narratives beyond the typical approaches, i.e. those of psychology or psychiatry. For the first time this experienced group of scholars gathers to promote a cross-border dialogue from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Abstract

This chapter presents a philosophical view to the concept of boredom [Langeweile] from its forms (bored for …, bored in …, one gets bored) and structural modes (leaving voids and postponing), worked by Martin Heidegger in his classes at the University of Freiburg during the winter semesters of 1929 and 1930. It is intended to rescue a marginal philosophical stance to the traditional positions of Heideggerian thought, being able, in the proposed hermeneutic-phenomenological transit, to interweave their philosophical images with cinematographic narratives that enrich the real understanding of the modernity. We assume boredom and its essence, Langweiligkeit, as the fundamental mood [Grundstimmung] of our era, allowing other mobility of thought to study the phenomena of cultural entertainment as a symptom of the modern disease by distancing the Dasein of the meeting, interrogation, and self-care.

In: The Culture of Boredom

Abstract

The following chapter attempts a hermeneutic-phenomenological interpretation of the sense of boredom as a fundamental possibility to comprehend our relationship with the world, according to Heideggerian analyses contained in its course of Freiburg of 1929–1930, entitled Die Grundbegriffe der Metaphysik [The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics]. We will show that, precisely from the assumption of a particular form of boredom, it can be possible to resignify the world, and from this, to open a creative possibility, specifically between the understanding ajar from the boredom by something and the creation of attunement.

In: The Culture of Boredom

Abstract

This chapter examines the concept of boredom in several philosophers in the line from German Idealism to Western and contemporary Marxism, relating the changes in this concept to successive social transformations. We thus propose a periodization for the conceptualization of boredom, which allows us to highlight the historicity of the concepts of boredom in philosophy and their inherent political (utopian) content. In this overview, we find two fundamental concepts of boredom: emptiness-boredom and repetition-boredom. These concepts are related to different treatments of boredom from these authors, oscillating between its praise as a long time for subjective introspection and its denunciation as a symptom of alienated time. Finally, we draw some considerations about time and boredom in contemporary societies.

In: The Culture of Boredom
In: The Culture of Boredom

Abstract

After 19 years, I write again about art and boredom from a very personal perspective. Ever since I left making art for the conventional art gallery (the white cube) some 24 years ago, my boredom with much of the local art world has always confounded me. I have always been anxious about this disinterest which I often feared might be an arrogance dismissive of a kind of art not worthy of my attention. But in reading again Patricia Meyer Spacks’ Boredom. The Literary History of a State of Mind, I have recently come to a full understanding of my weariness of and disengagement from much of the art being produced in Manila. My decision to do Institutional Critique is a result of a crisis of faith in art making, a situation that required me to call into crisis the institution of art production.

In: The Culture of Boredom
In: The Culture of Boredom
In: The Culture of Boredom