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International Educationalist Perspectives
Editor: Brent Bradford
The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives assembles a collective narrative related to the doctoral journey of recent graduates in the field of education. Clearly, the doctoral journey is not a linear process but rather a lattice of ever-evolving professional and personal relationships, experiences, perspectives, and insights.

From early on when considering whether or not to apply to a programme, to deciding on an institution and supervisor, to delving into the related literature, to data collection and analyses, to closing in on the defence, to results dissemination, and everything in between and beyond, the doctoral journey presents incalculable obstacles that can be, and have been, overcome by doctoral graduates—including the contributors in this inspirationally-sparked collective narrative.

Contributors are: Trudy Cardinal, Philip Wing Keung Chan, José da Costa, Alison Egan, Janet McConaghy, June McConaghy, Kelsey McEntyre, Sammy M. Mutisya, Christina A. Parker, Carla L. Peck, Colin G. Pennington, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Edgar Schmidt, and Pearl Subban.
While critical whiteness studies as a field has been attacked from both within and without, the ongoing realities of systemic white supremacy across the globe necessitate new and better understandings of whiteness, white racial identity, and their links with education. Encyclopedia of Critical Whiteness Studies in Education offers readers a broad summary of the multifaceted and interdisciplinary field of critical whiteness studies, the study of white racial identities in the context of white supremacy, in education. Featuring scholars from across the Anglophone world, this volume seeks to offer both introductions and deep dives into the ever-shifting field of critical whiteness research in education.

Artful Works and Dialogue about Art as Experience
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art, and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Cristina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
In Jean Baudrillard and Radical Education Theory: Turning Right to Go Left, the authors argue that Baudrillard has been underappreciated in philosophical and theoretical work in education. They introduce him here as an important figure in radical thought who has something to add to theoretical lines of inquiry in education.

The book does not offer an introduction to Baudrillard. Rather, his corpus is mined in order to describe how it functions as a counter to the code of education, rational thought, critical reason, etc. In effect, they establish that Baudrillard advocates for a counter-path to thinking that can shake us out of our ready-made thoughts and realize the radical potential for change.
Author: Ligia Pelosi
The Joy Principle is a fictionalised novel about teachers and teaching in neoliberal times. It addresses the themes of teacher agency within a context of critical and creative praxis. The story centres on Alex, a graduate teacher who decides to disrupt the mandated pedagogical practices of literacy education. As an agent of transformative change, Alex provides an examination of how children learn best and how teachers can re-author themselves in their work within the constraints of contemporary practice. The novel is accompanied by a commentary on arts-based, narrative fiction as research.
The Way of the Shamanic Teacher (Second Edition)
Author: Hunter O'Hara
Now, more than ever, high quality relationships between teachers and learners are critical to deep meaningful learning and to the learner's long-term success. Transcendent Teacher Learner Relationships: The Way of the Shamanic Teacher (Second Edition) explores the nature of the transcendent teacher learner relationship and precisely how such relationships of warmth, safety, mutual care, mutual respect and mutual trust are developed and maintained. Personal narratives from the classroom frontlines as well as the analysis contained herein provide a fresh outlook, a roadmap that leads to the most transformative relationships imaginable for teachers and learners.

Abstract

This case study extends ) Rap Therapy model to explore the pedagogical usefulness of contemporary rap music. Methodologically, the authors borrow the testimonio from Latina Feminist Scholarship, to explore the ways in which young people participating in a summer literacy program analyzed their lives and the world through rap music; how rap music supported their healing; and how rap music was used as a pedagogical tool. Over the course of four months the co-authors of this study created and analyzed 17 co-written testimonios for their generative themes. The authors conclude with a presentation of The (Re) mix—a rap-centered pedagogical framework. The (Re) mix is made up of three, interconnected pillars. One, contemporary rap music (re)tells the experience(s) of the dispossessed. It helps shift the blame for oppression in the world towards the structures of society. Second, contemporary rap music (re)affirms young peoples’ existence. It provides them with an imaginative environment to imagine a more just world. Third, contemporary rap music (re)stores our humanity. It is a tool to name, connect, and move beyond our pain, creating a context for healing as individuals in a collective society. The authors hope that findings of this study empower other educators to infuse contemporary rap music into their pedagogies as a method for students to better read and write the world, adding to the body of knowledge related to critical media literacy.

In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy
A Biographical Account of Racial, Class, and Gender Inequities in the Americas
Using auto-ethnography as a methodological framework, this book captures two diametrical poles of the author’s experiences growing up poor and being educated in a colonial school system in a developing country and currently working as a university professor in the United States. The author begins by recollecting his mixed childhood and adolescence experiences, including being subjected to abject poverty, escaping a sexual predator as a teenager, witnessing class, gender, and sexual inequities, while at the same time being supported by family, neighbours, and friends in his community. Next, the author talks about the social class privileges that he has enjoyed as a result of becoming a university professor while juxtaposing such privileges to micro-aggression, systemic racism, xenophobia, linguicism, and elitism that he has been facing in society, including in the Ivy Halls of White America.

Abstract

Previous research on Hip Hop Education has advocated for the inclusion of critical media literacy in schools and for the recognition of Hip Hop music and culture as a central component of young people’s literate and social identities (e.g. ; ; ). This article places critical Hip Hop literacy at the intersections of media education, social justice education, and culturally sustaining pedagogies by discussing the role of Hip Hop literature and culture as a form of text that can foster young people’s critical consciousness development in the secondary classroom. Through analysis of data collected in a high school Hip Hop Literature and Culture class, this qualitative case study examines how critical Hip Hop literacy practices can support youth sociopolitical development in racially diverse classrooms and schools. The results of this study reveal the need for schools to support students in identifying, analyzing, and challenging structures of oppression through the development of critical Hip Hop literacies.

In: The International Journal of Critical Media Literacy