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Author: Izabela Will
Is the relation between gestures and language conventionalized? Is it possible to investigate the backgrounds of the users by means of these gestures?
This book offers an in-depth analysis and description of five recurrent gestures used by Hausa speakers from northern Nigeria, examined from a cross-cultural perspective. The method based on studying naturalistic data available online (sermons, interviews and talk shows) can be applied to other languages with no speech corpora. Particular attention is paid to cultural practices and routinized behavior that affect both the performance of a gesture and its meaning and function. Everyday activities, such as greetings and religious rituals, as well as social hierarchy and gender differences are reflected in gestures. The results show that gestures and language reveal the shared cultural background of the speakers and reflect identical cognitive processes.
In African-Australian Marriage Migration: An Ethnography of (Un)happiness, Henrike A. Hoogenraad follows journeys of marriage migration among African-Australian couples. The study narrates these journeys as ‘happiness projects’, since for cross-border couples, happiness is connected to dreams for a life-long partnership that begins with the visa application. Yet, happiness is invoked as an aspired state rather than an achieved goal. The obstacles of government bureaucracy, institutional and everyday racism, and unrealistic expectations of romance prevent the hoped-for happy endings. This monograph upsets a ‘scam artist’ narrative that generalises migrant men and their sponsoring partners, and which obscures the difficult process of crossing borders both physical and intimate. Hoogenraad’s work is a welcome contribution to anthropological literature on marriage migration.
Asian Canadians—whether immigrant, international students, naturalized, native-born, or other—are hampered in their exploration and articulation of self by the dearth of critical writing both for them, and by them. Despite the influx of Asian students and their inflated tuition rates to Canadian postsecondary institutions, they are strikingly underrepresented in the literature of the academy. Critical theory focusing on Asian identity, anti-Asian racism, and the Asian-Canadian experience is limited, or presented as an artifact of the past.

Across the globe—but particularly in the English-speaking West—the internationalization of higher education continues its upward trend. 2017 data from the Canadian Bureau for International Education positioned Canada as the fourth-leading destination for international students seeking post-secondary education. The fact that the vast majority of international students at Canadian colleges and universities come from Asia has been well documented in domestic media, but the lived experiences and perspectives of these transnational individuals have not. This edited collection provides much-needed theorizing of Asian-Canadian lived experiences, focusing on such themes as: multiculturalism, diversity, race, culture, agency, education, community activism, citizenship, identity, model minority myths, gender, colonization, neoliberalism, and others.

Contributors include: Sarah Alam, Syed Fahad Ali, Wallis Caldoza, Valerie G. Damasco, Grace Garlow, Allison Lam, Kailan Leung, Juanna Nguyen, Dionisio Nyaga, Jasmine Pham, Vania Soepriatna, Tika Ram Thapa and Rose Ann Torres.
With this Series, the African-Europe Group for Interdisciplinary Studies (AEGIS) provides a venue for the publication of works drawn from the lively and expanding community of scholars with interests in Africa and its Diaspora. The AEGIS Series aims to publish books within the broad fields of study within the humanities and social sciences that would bring new approaches or innovative perspectives to the topics discussed. Titles comprise works that could also reflect established debate within African Studies if they provide new insights. Both individually-authored works and edited collections on focused themes will be considered.

African Dynamics is an annual publication of the Africa Studies Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands. Every year, a different theme is discussed from various perspectives by scholars from all over the world.
The Africa Studies Centre was founded in 1948, making it one of the oldest African Studies Centres in the world. Its main objectives are:
- to promote and undertake scientific research on Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in the field of the social sciences and humanities.
- to function as a national centre in the field of African studies and to contribute to the education and teaching in these sciences; and to promote the dissemination of knowledge and an understanding of African societies in the wider public sphere.

In this series Brill publishes monographs that illuminate issues of social change, broadly understood, in Africa south of the Sahara. Coherently edited volumes may also be considered. Brill invites original, empirical, work that makes an essential conceptual contribution to its field, and has a particular interest in work by younger scholars. Brill welcomes proposals from every branch of the social sciences and humanities that also appeal to a non-specialist audience. Studies of source materials for African history, African linguistics, and religion in Africa each have their own series and will not be included in this series. Wherever appropriate, authors are invited to suggest African publishers with whom their work might be published in partnership with Brill.
The aim of African Sources for African History is to establish a series of critical editions of indigenous African narrative sources for the history of sub-Saharan Africa, accessible to scholars and students in Africa and elsewhere. African Sources for African History intends to give African viewpoints a more central place in the writing of African history, by making African perspectives more easily available. Its stress on indigenous African sources is also hoped to inspire individual researchers to search actively for African sources and to make these available to the wider academic community.

Contemporary Africa as a Centre of Global Encounter
This work challenges received ideas of Africa as a marginal continent and place of exodus by considering the continent as a centre of global connectivity and confluence. Flows of people, goods, and investments towards Africa have increased and diversified over recent decades. In light of these changes, the contributions analyse new actors in such diverse fields as education, trade, infrastructure, and tourism. They show the historicity of many current mobilities towards Africa and investigate questions of agency and power in shaping encounters between Africans and others in Africa today. In this way, the volume contributes significantly to debates on Africa’s position in global mobility dynamics and provides a firm basis for further research.

Contributors are: Gérard Amougou, Alice Aterianus-Owanga, Eric Burton, Jean-Frédéric de Hasque, Mayke Kaag, Guive Khan-Mohammad, Fabien Nkot, Miriam Adelina Ocadiz Arriaga, Ute Röschenthaler, Alexandra Samokhvalova, Stefan Schmid, Sophia Thubauville, Di Wu.
Volume Editor: Francisco Bethencourt
This book explores the significance of gender in shaping the Portuguese-speaking world from the Middle Ages to the present. Sixteen scholars from disciplines including history, sociology, anthropology, linguistics, literature and cultural studies analyse different configurations and literary representations of women's rights and patriarchal constraints. Unstable constructions of masculinity, femininity, queer, homosexual, bisexual, and transgender identities and behaviours are placed in historical context. The volume pioneers in gendering the Portuguese expansion in Africa, Asia, and the New World and pays particular attention to an inclusive account of indigenous agencies.

Contributors are: Darlene Abreu-Ferreira, Vanda Anastácio, Francisco Bethencourt, Dorothée Boulanger, Rosa Maria dos Santos Capelão, Maria Judite Mário Chipenembe, Gily Coene, Philip J. Havik, Ben James, Anna M. Klobucka, Chia Longman, Amélia Polónia, Ana Maria S. A. Rodrigues, Isabel dos Guimarães Sá, Ana Cristina Santos, and João Paulo Silvestre.
Mursi is a Nilo-Saharan language spoken by a small group of people who live in the Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, and is one of the most endangered languages of the country.
Based on the fieldwork that the author conducted in beautiful villages of the Mursi community, this descriptive grammar is organized into fourteen chapters rich in examples and an appendix containing four transcribed texts. The readers are thus provided with a clear and useful tool, which constitutes and important addition to our knowledge of Mursi and of other related languages spoken in the area.
Besides being an empirical data source for linguists interested in typology and endangered language description and documentation, the grammar constitutes an invaluable gift to the speech community.