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Abstract

The newly found Gothic inscriptions from Crimea reopened the question of the Christian identity of the Crimean Goths in its interrelation with the Greek-Byzantine environment. The Mangup graffito I.1 and the Late Medieval inscription from Bakhchysarai both contain the acronymised formula ‘(Saviour) God Jesus’ which we think was a purposeful declaration of the Gothic community’s Orthodox Nicene allegiance. The expanded variant of Ps. 76:15 in the graffito of Mangup proves its liturgical character and the involvement of the Crimean Goths with Byzantine liturgical processes. The alternative counting of weekdays which from the 11th century onwards is epigraphically attesed in the Gothic eparchy in Crimea may have its origin in the Gothic church calendar of the 4th–5th century and have influenced neighbouring peoples of Eastern Europe and the Caucasus.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

This paper addresses scholarly and ideological interpretations of Crimean Goths from the late eighteenth century to the collapse of the Soviet Union. At the first stage, intellectual travellers and armchair researchers discovered the basic set of written sources, using archaeology often as illustrations and producing many long-living phantoms. From the mid-nineteenth century on, archaeological and historical researches made a big step towards understanding Crimean Gothic history. However, the Crimean War destroyed sites and museum collections, thus being a prologue to the terrible events of the Russian Civil War and the Second World War. The first Soviet decades were an ambivalent period: advancement of scientific research combined with ideological pressure. The shock of the Second World War put Crimean Goths into the focus of ideological struggle: the Nazis used them in substantiation of their rights to the Crimea as imagined “Land of the Goths” (Gotenland), while Soviet ideologists preferred to erase the Goths from Crimea’s history. However, continuing excavations collected abundant materials related to different periods and features of the Crimean Goths’ history.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Petr Shuvalov

Abstract

This analysis of the text of Pseudo-Maurice’s Strategikon ch. xi,3, discussing the “light-haired peoples,” is based on a new investigation of the MSS by the on-line photocopies, and shows that in the text there are many inner citations and paraphrases as well as some traces of redactions previous to the archetype (i.e. common ancestor of the MSS). The analysis of the punctuation allows to propose the hypothesis that the cola in Leo’s Problemata do reflect directly the system of punctuation in the hyparchetype α (i.e. the ancestor of β, which is the progenitor of the main MSS). The text’s development before the first split of the tradition between MSS families could be separated into the following phases for ch. xi,3: (1) Xanth (the Urtext of the chapter), (2) Kairos (many interpolations and possible extraction of the text of Xanth including the first part of the title), and (3) Abar (some additional interpolations, including the names of the Franks and Lombards). The blonds (xantha ethne) of the first phase are neither Franks nor Lombards. More likely they are different gentes of the Middle Danube between the time of Attila and the appearance of the Avars – like Ostrogoths, Gepids, Heruls, etc.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Arend Quak

Abstract

Although the text of the psalms did not survive in Wulfila’s Gothic bible translation, some verses are cited in the bible fragments and in other Gothic texts. Here these quotes are compared with surviving West-Germanic translations of the same passages to view the differences and the similarities between them.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Michel Kazanski

Abstract

Une série d’objets de tradition vestimentaire italo-ostrogothique (boucles de ceinture et fibules) apparaissent en Crimée et sur la péninsule de Taman au VIe siècle. Ces objets témoignent du déplacement de groupes de population italo-ostrogothique vers le nord de la mer Noire. Il est possible que cette migration se soit déroulée dans le cadre de la politique militaire de Justinien, par exemple la déportation de prisonniers de guerre avec leurs familles et leurs installations sur les frontières lointaines de l’Empire romain d’Orient.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Giacomo Bucci

Abstract

The “genitive of negation” (GenNeg) is a morphosyntactic phenomenon that has seldom been addressed in Germanic, and Gothic in particular. By means of internal and typological comparison, this article aims to pinpoint the major features of this phenomenon, as found in the Gothic Bible, from a semantic perspective. I will put forth the hypothesis that the genitive of negation was a non-productive phenomenon in Gothic, and that there are reasons to distinguish it from the partitive genitive (PartGen), at least synchronically.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik

Abstract

This article addresses the active matrimonial diplomacy of Theoderic the Great, its textual design, kin rhetoric and its possible patterns. The main issue of this article is the attempt to understand whether there were any Germanic patterns of behaviour that correlate with the Latin rhetorical design of Theoderic’s matrimonial diplomacy. The main source used is the Variae, a letter collection of Cassiodorus Senator.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Alexey Muravyev

Abstract

The present article deals with the literary image of a Gothic man who happened to be in Edessa in the 5th century AD as a part of Roman auxiliary troops. He is reported to marry there a local girl under pretext of being a celibatarian. Having left Syria for Gothia, it turned out that he was married and had children. The Syrian wife became a slave and suffered a lot before returning miraculously back to Edessa. From the comparative study of the sources it becomes clear that the Gothic auxiliary troops were summoned to Edessa in connection with the advance of the Huns. Notwithstanding the common equation of Goths and Getae, the Gothic soldier in question was Germanic and not Getan (Dacian). The last question is the character of the marriage gift he presented for his temporary marriage.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik