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Buddhist Philosophy of Consciousness brings Buddhist voices to the study of consciousness. This book explores a variety of different Buddhist approaches to consciousness that developed out of the Buddhist theory of non-self. Topics taken up in these investigations include: how we are able to cognize our own cognitions; whether all conscious states involve conceptualization; whether distinct forms of cognition can operate simultaneously in a single mental stream; whether non-existent entities can serve as intentional objects; and does consciousness have an intrinsic nature, or can it only be characterized functionally? These questions have all featured in recent debates in consciousness studies. The answers that Buddhist philosophers developed to such questions are worth examining just because they may represent novel approaches to questions about consciousness.
Concept and Judgment in Brentano's Logic Lectures is concerned with a crucial aspect of Brentano's philosophy as it was developed in his logic lectures from c. 1870 to c. 1885. The first part of the volume is an analysis of his theory of concept and judgment. The second part consists of materials, including a German edition and English translation of notes that a student took from a lecture course that Brentano gave. A short book by this student on Brentano is also translated in the materials.

The access to Brentano's philosophy is enhanced by this volume not only with regard to his logic as a theory of deductive inference, but also to his descriptive psychology, metaphysics, and philosophy of language.
Author: Andrew Oberg
The question of the self, of what the self is (or even if there is a self), has been one that has grown alongside humanity – has haunted humanity – throughout our history. Blurred: Selves Made and Selves Making guides the reader down these dark corridors, shining light on the specters of theories past and unveiling a new self-view to hover afresh, beckoning to roadways beyond.

In this remarkably interdisciplinary study, philosophy of mind joins with contemporary neuroscience and cutting-edge psychology to lay bare the how of identity formation, judgment, and behavior generation. Drawing on thinkers from both the Continental and Analytic traditions, consciousness is explored and a uniquely realist self-concept presented that, if adopted, offers a life lived otherwise.

Abstract

In 1934, attempting to extricate himself from the accusation of connivance with the Nazis, Jung conjectured about the existence of a Jewish complex. Recently, Jungian analyst Tirzah Firestone has argued that Jews suffer from a Jewish cultural complex which revolves around clusters of tribal traumatic experience. This discussion takes up from both Jung and Firestone addressing the question: The Jewish complex, whose complex is it? Stressing the relational element of Jung’s complex theory, developed into a theory of cultural complexes by Singer and Kimbles, the author of this paper, whose grandfather died in Auschwitz, places the Jewish complex among us Westerners, Jews and non-Jews. The Jewish complex is considered an affectively charged shared mental representation of a traumatic history, whose denouement is the Shoah, that affects us all. Cultural complexes such as the Jewish complex need to be understood relationally if there is to be any form of ‘resolution’.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Cameran Ashraf

Abstract

The shadow of technological development has received significant attention. User tracking, emotional manipulation, disinformation, online radicalization, and restrictions on free speech have shattered the cyber-utopianism of the 1990s and early 2000s. Yet the solutions to address technology’s problems are framed as requiring more technology. This technological solutionism and its subsequent choices mask unconscious processes which give rise to new technologies. This essay is an attempt to interrogate the history of these choices by taking a depth psychological approach to the technological unconscious, beginning with the impact of writing on the psyche to the advent of computer screens. With technologies becoming more sophisticated and a primary way we interact with reality, it is vital to create a body of depth psychology literature on technology’s history and impacts.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Robert G. Sacco

Abstract

Recent years have seen an increased interest in journal articles and books on the topic of synchronicity. Such scholarly interest is consistent with increased cultural attention given to synchronicity and changes to the social context in which spirituality thrives as a personal search for meaning, which may or may not relate to religion. Based on a review of the extant literature on synchronicity, this paper proposes a new taxonomy for better understanding and analyzing the growing phenomenon of individual and cultural interest in synchronicity. The taxonomy consists of four dimensions of synchronicity: Context, Process, Content, and Explanation. The primary contributions of this paper are (a) description and definition of the concept of synchronicity, (b) preliminary proposal of a taxonomy of synchronicity, and (c) outline of a research agenda to conduct theory-based studies of synchronicity phenomena.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Steve Myers

Abstract

Jung saw a role for the methods of natural science in analytical psychology alongside other ways of developing of knowledge. This paper puts a cryptic and undeveloped idea in Psychological Types to the test using the principles of Karl Popper’s philosophy of science. The idea is a combination of Jung’s philosophy, esse in anima, and his theory of opposites applied to politics. It is explained using a term coined by the philosopher W.V.O Quine—ontological relativity. There are key similarities between the two philosophical concepts, due to Jung and Quine having a common influence in William James’ radical empiricism. The ontological relativity of political opposites is subjected to three tests that attempt to falsify it. All three attempts at falsification fail, which therefore provides some support for the idea. However, there are a number of anomalous results that raise significant questions requiring further research. This paper should therefore be viewed as the first step in a programme of research to examine the ontological relativity of political opposites that is inherent within esse in anima.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies
Author: Uljana Akca

Abstract

It has often been argued that Jung failed to explain and ground his theory of the archetypes sufficiently, as he remained caught between a psychological, a biological, and a transcendent model of explanation. Inspired by Martin Heidegger’s methodology in Being and Time, this paper will combine an ontological inquiry with a phenomenological analysis of the archetype, to re-interpret it beyond the Jungian psychology and its inherent paradoxes. I will outline a distinction between a psychological appropriation of the archetype, and one that approaches its numinosity as such. According to my argument, this twofold phenomenology of the archetype reveals it to be a form through which we become aware of an ontological difference within our being. The argument will mainly be unfolded through an interpretation of the nymph-maiden in Lucas Cranach’s 16th century painting series Nymph of the Spring, followed by an assessment of our contemporary relation to the same archetype.

In: International Journal of Jungian Studies