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Author: Florin Curta
In The Long Sixth Century in Eastern Europe, Florin Curta offers a social and economic history of East Central, South-Eastern and Eastern Europe during the 6th and 7th centuries. It challenges the current model of transition from Antiquity to the early Middle Ages on the basis of an interpretation of the written sources, but especially of an enormous amount of archaeological evidence accumulated in the last 50 years or so. It deals with societies in close contact with the Roman world, as well with those located very far from it. It addresses questions of property, subsistence, crafts, trade, and social change.
A Portrait of a Local Intermediary in Russian Central Asia
Author: Tetsu Akiyama
In The Qїrghїz Baatïr and the Russian Empire Tetsu Akiyama tells the story of Shabdan Jantay uulu (1839/40–1912), a local ruler from the northern Qїrghїz (Kirghiz, Kyrgyz) tribes. Akiyama explores Shabdan’s intermediary role in the Russian Empire’s military advance and rule in southern Semireche’e from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century. Commonly portrayed as a faithful collaborator to Russia, he appears here as a flexible and tough intermediary who made strategic use of Russian dominance for his own ends. Based on a comprehensive study of primary sources, this interdisciplinary monograph dynamically reconstructs Shabdan’s biography, revealing the dilemmas faced by both Russian and Qїrghїz society, which were not only political, but also social, economic, and religious.
The relationship between language and identity is a complex topic everywhere in the world, but maybe it is even more crucial for those people living in the Balkans who speak a Romance variety.
This volume is the result of a project started by the Balkan History Association, and brings together scholars trained in social sciences and humanities to offer the reader a thorough sociolinguistic and anthropological account of this region. It constitutes a contribution to a reformulation of methodological and analytical issues, providing a better insight in the linguistic and geopolitical processes taking place in the area.

Contributors are Michael Studemund-Halévy, Cătălin Mamali, Anna-Christine Weirich, Ewa Nowicka, Daniela-Carmen Stoica, Mircea Măran, Zvjezdana Vrzić, and Monica Huțanu.
Übersetzung und wissenschaftliche Redaktion von Bernhard Wiaderny
Editor / Translator: Bernard Wiaderny
Zwei führende polnische Zeithistoriker schildern die jüngste Geschichte ihres Landes vom deutschen Überfall 1939 bis zur Gegenwart.
Andrzej Friszke und Antoni Dudek sind nicht nur namhafte polnische Historiker, sondern auch Zeitzeugen und scharfe Beobachter der aktuellen politischen Entwicklung ihres Landes. Mit dem Schwerpunkt auf Politik- und Sozialgeschichte geben sie einen Überblick über die Geschicke des Landes in der Zeit der deutschen Besatzung Polens und die Etablierung des kommunistischen Systems. Die Rolle der Opposition und der katholischen Kirche in der Volksrepublik, die Entstehung der Gewerkschaft „Solidarność“ (an der Friszke aktiv beteiligt war) sowie die politische Transformation vor und nach 1989 werden breit behandelt. Besonderen Wert gewinnt das Buch durch die Berücksichtigung der zeithistorisch bislang kaum erfassten 2000er Jahre.
Buriat Buddhists in Imperial Russia
The book systematically explores the history of the Buddhist community in the Russian Empire. It offers an advanced overview of the relations that existed between the Buriat Buddhists and the Russian imperial authorities.
Various institutions and actors represented Russian power: foreign and interior ministries, the Irkutsk general-governorship, the Orthodox Christian mission of East Siberia, local journalists and academic scholars. The book is focussing especially on the evolution of imperial legislation and specific administrative mechanisms aiming at the regulation of Buddhist affairs. The author demonstrates how these actors responded to conflicting situations and collisions of interests. Thus the history of relations between Russia and her Buddhist subjects is shown as a complex process with participation of a number of actors with their own interests and motivations.
A Military History of Russia’s Move into the South Caucasus and the First Russo-Iranian War, 1801-1813
In From the Kur to the Aras George A. Bournoutian presents the first military history of the Russian advance into the South Caucasus in 1801 and the ensuing First Russo-Iran War (1804-1813) that was a crucial step in the Russian Empire’s eventual expansion into the Caucasus region. Using both Iranian and Russian primary sources, the work vividly describes the strategies, military capabilities and personalities that clashed for ten years, ending with the Treaty of Golestan. Numerous and illustrative maps, as well as informative appendices, add to a balanced view of a struggle between and ancient and an emerging empire.
The Image of a Ruler in the Latin Text of The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja
The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja is considered to be among the most important and mysterious narrative sources discussing the Slavic presence on the Adriatic coast and its hinterland. It is also one of the most controversial. This detailed study examines the Latin version of the chronicle, and it explores the deeper meanings hidden behind the history of the contrived monarchy, acknowledging the tradition regarding the fate of its leading rulers. The work focuses on four representatives of the royal family, rulers during key periods in the narrative. Each of the kings presented a different pattern of rule, and each of them, in his own way, established new rules for the functioning of the Kingdom of the Slavs.