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In African Australian Marriage Migration: An Ethnography of (Un)happiness, Henrike Hoogenraad follows journeys of marriage migration among African-Australian couples. The study narrates these journeys as ‘happiness projects’, since for cross-border couples, happiness is connected to dreams for a life-long partnership that begins with the visa application. Yet, happiness is invoked as an aspired state rather than an achieved goal. The obstacles of government bureaucracy, institutional and everyday racism, and unrealistic expectations of romance prevent the hoped-for happy endings. This monograph upsets a ‘scam artist’ narrative that generalises migrant men and their sponsoring partners, and which obscures the difficult process of crossing borders both physical and intimate. Hoogenraad’s work is a welcome contribution to anthropological literature on marriage migration.
Asian Canadians—whether immigrant, international students, naturalized, native-born, or other—are hampered in their exploration and articulation of self by the dearth of critical writing both for them, and by them. Despite the influx of Asian students and their inflated tuition rates to Canadian postsecondary institutions, they are strikingly underrepresented in the literature of the academy. Critical theory focusing on Asian identity, anti-Asian racism, and the Asian-Canadian experience is limited, or presented as an artifact of the past.

Across the globe—but particularly in the English-speaking West—the internationalization of higher education continues its upward trend. 2017 data from the Canadian Bureau for International Education positioned Canada as the fourth-leading destination for international students seeking post-secondary education. The fact that the vast majority of international students at Canadian colleges and universities come from Asia has been well documented in domestic media, but the lived experiences and perspectives of these transnational individuals have not. This edited collection provides much-needed theorizing of Asian Canadian lived experiences, focusing on such themes as: multiculturalism, diversity, race, culture, agency, education, community activism, citizenship, identity, model minority myths, gender, colonization, neoliberalism, and others.

Contributors include: Syed Fahad Ali, Sarah Alam, Wallis Caldoza, Valerie G. Damasco, Grace Garlow, Allison Lam, Dionisio Nyaga, Juanna Nguyen, Jasmine Pham, Tika Ram Thapa, Vania Soepriatna, Rose Ann Torres, and Kailan Leung.
This edited volume offers new insights into the inner life of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) and introduces scholars of African security dynamics to innovative epistemological, conceptual and methodological approaches. Based on intellectual openness and an interest in transdisciplinary perspectives, the volume challenges existing orthodoxies, poses new questions and opens a discussion on actual research practice. Drawing on Global Studies and critical International Studies perspectives, the authors follow inductive approaches and let the empirical data enrich their theoretical frameworks and conceptual tools. In this endeavor they focus on actors, practices and narratives involved in African Peace and Security and move beyond the often Western-centric premises of research carried out within rigid disciplinary boundaries.

Contributors are Michael Aeby, Yvonne Akpasom, Katharina P.W. Döring, Ulf Engel, Fana Gebresenbet Erda, Linnéa Gelot, Amandine Gnanguênon, Toni Haastrup, Jens Herpolsheimer, Alin Hilowle, Jamie Pring, Lilian Seffer, Thomas Kwasi Tieku, Antonia Witt, Dawit Yohannes Wondemagegnehu
Contemporary Africa as a Centre of Global Encounter
This work challenges received ideas of Africa as a marginal continent and place of exodus by considering the continent as a centre of global connectivity and confluence. Flows of people, goods, and investments towards Africa have increased and diversified over recent decades. In light of these changes, the contributions analyse new actors in such diverse fields as education, trade, infrastructure, and tourism. They show the historicity of many current mobilities towards Africa and investigate questions of agency and power in shaping encounters between Africans and others in Africa today. In this way, the volume contributes significantly to debates on Africa’s position in global mobility dynamics and provides a firm basis for further research.

Contributors are: Gérard Amougou, Alice Aterianus-Owanga, Eric Burton, Jean-Frédéric de Hasque, Mayke Kaag, Guive Khan-Mohammad, Fabien Nkot, Miriam Adelina Ocadiz Arriaga, Ute Röschenthaler, Alexandra Samokhvalova, Stefan Schmid, Sophia Thubauville, Di Wu.
Ce volume présente un récit oral par le griot célébré Djèmory Kouyaté de Nyagassola (actuelle Guinée) (décédé en 2019). Il traite de la façon dont on se souvient de l'époque qui relie la fondation de la société mandingue par Soundiata jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Les récits oraux sur cette époque sont rares car ils exigent du narrateur une compréhension avancée de l'histoire régionale et des relations entre les lignées dirigeantes concurrentes.
Le griot célébré, Djèmory Kouyaté (décédé en 2019), a réalisé ce récit à Naréna (Mali actuel), offrant ainsi un aperçu unique des stratégies de narration et des compétences diplomatiques des griots, car le récit de Djèmory peut être comparé à certains de ses enregistrements antérieurs réalisés à Nyagassola (actuelle Guinée), une ville gouvernée par une lignée rivale des Bandjougousi de Naréna. L’Histoire des Bandjougousi est donc une source importante d’historiographie ouest-africaine.

This volume features an oral account by the acclaimed griot Djèmory Kouyaté from Nyagassola (present-day Guinée) (d. 2019). It deals with the way the era that bridges the foundation of their society by Sunjata to their present-day society, called Manding, is remembered. Oral accounts on this era are rare as they demand from the narrator an advanced understanding of regional history and the relationships between competing ruling lineages.
The acclaimed griot Djèmory Kouyaté (d. 2019) performed this account in Naréna (present-day Mali), thus offering a unique insight into griots’ storytelling strategies and diplomatic skills, because Djèmory’s account can be compared with earlier recordings of him made in Nyagassola (present-day Guinée), a town ruled by a rival lineage to the Bandjougousi from Naréna. L’Histoire des Bandjougousi is therefore an important source for West African historiography.
Empowerment, Gender and Development in an African Movement
In Matarenda/Talents in Zimbabwean Pentecostalism, the fourteen contributors to this multidisciplinary collection reflect on how Pentecostalism contributes to the empowerment of marginalised societies, how it empowers women in particular through the matarenda (talents) principles, and how it contributes to the development of wider society. All but three of the authors are Zimbabwean Pentecostals.

The book deals with such subjects as gender equality, economics and finance, poverty alleviation and sustainable development, education, and entrepreneurship. A remarkable independent Zimbabwean church has harnessed biblical principles from the Parable of the Talents to empower women and those marginalised by economic disasters. It is particularly relevant for understanding the potential of African Pentecostalism in dealing with social and economic challenges.
Mursi is a Nilo-Saharan language spoken by a small group of people who live in the Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, and is one of the most endangered languages of the country.
Based on the fieldwork that the author conducted in beautiful villages of the Mursi community, this descriptive grammar is organized into fourteen chapters rich in examples and an appendix containing four transcribed texts. The readers are thus provided with a clear and useful tool, which constitutes and important addition to our knowledge of Mursi and of other related languages spoken in the area.
Besides being an empirical data source for linguists interested in typology and endangered language description and documentation, the grammar constitutes an invaluable gift to the speech community.
African History seeks to publish scholarly writing on the history of Africa. It welcomes submissions on the history of any part of the continent and its islands. Works could range from the earliest epochs through to the recent past. Particularly welcome are studies that bring to light new archival materials, offer new interpretations of established sources or arguments, and that are interdisciplinary in method but historically-grounded.

We are keen to have the publications in this series widely available on the African continent and therefore pursue co-publishing arrangements with local publishers.