Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24,683 items for :

  • International Law x
  • Brill | Nijhoff x
  • International Law: General Interest x
Clear All
South Korea, Japan and the Search for a Peaceful Solution
Author: Maria Xiouri
In The Breach of a Treaty: State Responses in International Law, Maria Xiouri examines the relationship between responses to the breach of a treaty according to the law of treaties and the law of State responsibility, namely, between the termination of the treaty or the suspension of its operation and countermeasures. Based on extensive analysis of State practice, the relevant legal instruments, international case law and literature, the book critically examines the concept of responses to the breach of a treaty, their legal regime and their operation in practice. It focuses on suspension of the operation of a treaty and countermeasures, challenging the prevailing view that there is a clear distinction between them, and argues that the former has been effectively superseded by the latter.
The European Yearbook of Minority Issues provides a critical and timely review of contemporary developments in minority-majority relations in Europe. It combines analysis, commentary and documentation in relation to conflict management, international legal developments and domestic legislation affecting minorities in Europe.
Part I contains scholarly articles and, in the 2019 volume, it centres on religious issues that have come before courts of law.
Part II contains reports on national and international developments.
Part III features book reviews introducing and critiquing new, relevant literature within the disciplines of the social sciences, humanities and law.

Apart from providing a unique annual overview of minority issues for both scholars and practitioners in this field, the Yearbook is an indispensable reference tool for libraries, research institutes as well as governments and international organisations.

The European Yearbook of Minority Issues is also available online.
Series Editors: Andrea Bonomi and Damiano Canapa
The Series offers an outlet for monographs and collective works making substantial contributions to interdisciplinary research. Each book in the Series shall contain lessons that both companies and governments will need “to reinvent themselves for sustained success”.
This book casts new light on the application of the principle of proportionality in international law. Proportionality is claimed to play a central role governing the exercise of public power in international law and has been presented as the ‘ultimate rule of law’. It has also been the subject of fierce criticism: it is argued that it leads to unreflexive and arbitrary application of the law and deprives rights of their role as a ’firewall’ protecting individuals. But the debate on proportionality has tended to focus on the question of ‘how’ proportionality should be carried out. Much less attention has been devoted to the question of ‘who’.
This edited volume bring together scholars from a wide range of areas of international law to consider that question: whose interests are at stake when courts and other legal authorities apply the principle of proportionality? In so doing, this volume casts new light on the role which proportionality can play in international law, in shaping and modulating the power relations between the different entities governed by it.
Domestic Courts, Commercial Arbitration Institutions and Tribunal Jurisdiction
Author: Joel Dahlquist
Author: Huw Llewellyn
Huw Llewellyn offers a comparative institutional analysis of the five United Nations criminal tribunals (for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia and Lebanon), assessing the strengths and weaknesses of their institutional forms in supporting the governance, independence and impartiality of these pioneering criminal justice bodies.

Largely overlooked in the otherwise comprehensive literature on international criminal justice, this book focuses on “parenthood”, “oversight” and “ownership” by the tribunals’ governing bodies, concepts unnecessary in national jurisdictions, and traces the tension between governance and judicial independence through the different phases of the tribunals’ lifecycles: from their establishment to commencement of operations, completion of mandates and closure, and finally to the “afterlife” of their residual phase.
Economic Integration, Trade, and Investment in the Post-Soviet and Greater Eurasian Space