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In Education in China, ca. 1840–present Meimei Wang, Bas van Leeuwen and Jieli Li offer a description of the transformation of the Chinese education system from the traditional Confucian teaching system to a modern mode. In doing so, they touch on various debates about education such as the speed of the educational modernization around 1900, the role of female education, and the economic efficiency of education. This description is combined with relevant data stretching from the second half of 19th century to present collected mainly from statistical archives and contemporary investigations.
Documents from the Former Secret Soviet Archives
The collection of archival documents Karl Radek on China reflects the views of one of the major Soviet China specialists, activists of the Russian revolutionary movement, and leaders of the Trotskyist Opposition, Karl Bernhardovich Radek (1885-1939). The documents present an original conception of the history of China from ancient times to the twentieth century as well as a delineation of the fundamental political problems of China in the 1920s. The appendices contain letters from Trotsky to Radek as well as the 'Chronological Information' of Zinoviev and Trotsky, outlining the most important stages of the struggle of the United Left Opposition against the Stalinist majority in the AUCP(b) regarding problems of the Chinese revolution. None of the documents have ever been published in English.
Author: Ka-Chai Tam
In Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks, Ka-chai Tam argues that the prefectural judge in the judiciary of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) became crucial to upholding justice in Chinese society.

In light of two late Ming casebooks, namely the Mengshui zhai cundu (盟水齋存牘) by Yan Junyan and the Zheyu xinyu (折獄新語) by Li Qing, Ka-chai Tam demonstrates that the late Ming judges handled their cases with a high level of consistency in judicial reasoning and practice in every type of case, despite their differing regions and literary styles. Equipped with relative institutional independence and growing professionalism, they played an indispensable role in checking and guaranteeing the legal performance of their subordinate magistrates.
In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks