Browse results

Author: James D. Dvorak
In The Interpersonal Metafunction in 1 Corinthians 1-4, James D. Dvorak offers a linguistic-critical discourse analysis of 1 Cor 1-4 utilizing Appraisal Theory, a model rooted in the modern sociolinguistic paradigm known as Systemic-Functional Linguistics. This work is concerned primarily with the interpersonal meanings encoded in the text and how they pertain to the act of resocialization. Dvorak pays particular attention to the linguistics of appraisal in Paul’s language to determine the values with which Paul expects believers in Christ to align. This book will be of great value to biblical scholars and students with interests in biblical Greek, functional linguistics, appraisal theory, hermeneutics, exegesis, and 1 Corinthians.
Language and Cultural Contact in the Caribbean
Volume Editors: Glenda-Alicia Leung and Miki Loschky
In Freedom through Submission Johannes Renders explores Danish-Muslim statements on human freedom. Within a context where public talk of Islam is largely mediated by an incessant succession of controversies, the notion of freedom is weaponized both by and against a growing Muslim community. Danish Muslims take issue with liberal associations of the notion with autonomy and choice, and seek to reconfigure the public debate that pits freedom against Islam. This book brings out a sophisticated and reflective Muslim discourse, in which freedom is something individuals must simultaneously exercise, surrender, and achieve through a cultivated relinquishing of the will to Allah.

Abstract

Acceptable analyticities, i.e. contradictions or tautologies, constitute problematic evidence for the idea that language includes a deductive system. In recent discussion, two accounts have been presented in the literature to explain the available evidence. According to one of the accounts, grammatical analyticities are accessible to the system but a pragmatic strengthening repair mechanism can apply and prevent the structures from being actually interpreted as contradictions or tautologies. The proposed data, however, leaves it open whether other versions of the meaning modulation operation are required. Novel evidence we present argues that a loosening version of the repair mechanism must be available. Our observation concerns acceptable lexical contradictions that cannot be rescued if only a strengthening version of the pragmatic strategy is available.

In: International Review of Pragmatics

Abstract

This paper presents an investigation into the impact of teaching pragmatic competence to translation students who translate from English (L2) to Persian (L1). For the experiment, the participants were requested to identify implicit discourse markers in a source text and to transfer them into the target text. This investigation used Think Aloud Protocols (TAP) to monitor students’ inferential translation processes. The results of this study pinpointed the challenging role of pragmatic competence for translation students. Translation performance in an experimental group of participants exposed to a period of pragmatic classroom instruction was compared to that of a control group which did not receive this training. Finally, the data analysis indicated that pragmatic teaching improved the translation students’ pragmatic competence in the experimental group through identifying both implicit and explicit discourse markers in the source text. This was clearly lacking in a number of students’ translations in the control group.

In: International Review of Pragmatics

Abstract

The following text is a review of Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language, edited by Sebastian Sunday Grève and Jakub Mácha (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. ISBN 978-1-137-47253-3. xxi + 314 pages). Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language is a collection of eleven essays investigating the creative potential of language within Wittgensteinian philosophy language. The essays are grouped into five sections, and cover a whole range of issues including language creativity, conceptions of art, ethics, metaphysics, but also Wittgenstein’s comments on Gödel’s proof, and Alfred Loos’s influence on Wittgenstein.

In: International Review of Pragmatics

Abstract

This paper develops an account of metaphor and its cognitive value. The motivation for this account lies in two considerations: 1) there is a problem, the proposition problem, that plagues many accounts of metaphor and its cognitive value, and 2) a recent criticism of Grice’s program and its semantic-pragmatic distinction by Lepore and Stone (2015) is grounded on the assumption that its account of metaphor is saddled with the proposition problem. Thus there is a need for an account of metaphor that explains its cognitive value without raising the proposition problem, and if successful, we also remove a criticism of Grice’s program. The proposed account of metaphor is one according to which, in uttering a metaphor, the speaker conversationally implicates a metaphorical perspective. This account of metaphor’s cognitive value is grounded in an understanding of metaphorical perspective as itself non-propositional.

In: International Review of Pragmatics
Author: Adam Wojtaszek

Abstract

The paper focuses on the institutional background of the publishing practices of Polish scholars, with special emphasis on publications in English. The University of Silesia in Katowice represents a Polish Higher Education Institution which places significant emphasis on international publications. On the basis of two data collection instruments, a report on point-winning publications (2017–2020) and a survey conducted among 197 faculty members, the author portrays the publication-related situation of the university and its most important determinants. Besides the facts pertaining to the distribution of point-winning publications among disciplines and languages, the article address such important issues as the authors’ strategies employed in the preparation of English language manuscripts, language-related issues articulated by the reviewers, and reasons for not publishing in English. A connection is made between the institutional context in which scholarly texts are composed and the strategic choices made by the authors in the process of manuscript drafting.

In: International Review of Pragmatics

Abstract

Our purpose in this paper is to present the findings of a study aimed at investigating how second language (L2) student-writers construct their identities as academic authors in tertiary education. We consider the restraints institutionalized text production can place on the constitution of writer identity, and call for pedagogical approaches to writing to take on board our findings to better help students in the process of finding their unique authorial voice. While the specific socio-cultural and institutional contexts within which people write limit possibilities for their self-representation, we argue that student writers should be encouraged to bring their own life histories and sense of the self to their texts. The study follows the notion of writer voice as proposed by Lehman (2018). She proposes categorising writer voice into three main types: individual, collective and depersonalized. As these three aspects of voice are predominantly cued through metadiscourse features we employed a three-dimensional analytic rubric designed by Lehman (2018) in order to identify and analyze the potential of individual voice in the facilitation and enhancement of academic writing in a second language (see Lehman, 2018).

In: International Review of Pragmatics
Volume Editor: Xosé M. Núñez Seixas
This volume assembles the papers presented at the conference The International Context of the Galician Language Brotherhoods and the Nationality Question in Interwar Europe (Council of Galician Culture, Santiago de Compostela, October 2016). The different contributions, written by historians, political scientists and linguists, shed new light on the political development of the nationality question in Europe during the First World War and its aftermath, covering theoretical developments and debates, social mobilization and cultural perspectives. They also address the topic from different scales, blending the global and transnational outlook with the view from below, from the local contexts, with particular attention to peripheral areas, whilst East European and West European nationalities are dealt with on an equal footing, covering from Iberian Galicia to the Caucasus.

Contributors are: Bence Bari, Stefan Berger, Miguel Cabo, Stefan Dyroff, Lourenzo Fernández Prieto, Johannes Kabatek, Joep Leerssen, Ramón Máiz, Xosé M. Núñez Seixas, Malte Rolf, Ramón Villares, and Francesca Zantedeschi.