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An Environmental History of Japan’s Rivers, 1600–1930
In Turbulent Streams: An Environmental History of Japan’s Rivers, 1600–1930, Roderick I. Wilson describes how the rivers of Japan are both hydrologically and historically dynamic. Today, these waterways are slowed, channeled, diverted, and dammed by a myriad of levees, multiton concrete tetrapods, and massive multipurpose dams. In part, this intensive engineering arises from the waterways falling great elevations over short distances, flowing over unstable rock and soil, and receiving large quantities of precipitation during monsoons and typhoons. But this modern river regime is also the product of a history that narrowed both these waterways and people’s diverse interactions with them in the name of flood control. Neither a story of technological progress nor environmental decline, this history introduces the concept of environmental relations as a category of historical analysis both to explore these fluvial interactions and reveal underappreciated dimensions of Japanese history.
Series Editors: David Sonnenfeld and Guobin Yang
Chinese Research Perspectives on the Environment (CREN) is the new generation of The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Yearbooks: Environment. As with the CASS Yearbooks, the original versions of these volumes are published in China by Social Sciences Academic Press (SSAP) and are edited principally by leading researchers from CASS and other top research institutions and universities. CREN is one of the four subseries under the Chinese Research Perspectives (CRP) series, with each subseries focused on one of the four subject areas: education, the environment, population and labor, and society. The CRP volumes include English translations of contributions selected from the Chinese CASS Yearbooks. The selection of contributions for the English-language series and the translations of those volumes are supervised by international advisory boards. The CREN volumes provide English-speaking readers with firsthand information and insights into China’s top scholars’ discussions on urgent national and global environmental issues facing China. The volumes serve as a rare primary source in English for those interested in studying the development of civil society in China.

Series Editors: Carmen Meinert and Claus Leggewie
Man influences the environment and climate and the consequences are now felt around the globe. National or regional efforts to restrict or at least contain the damage can only be insufficient: in principle environmental and climate protection needs a global concept.
Paradoxically, the way we perceive environmental and climate change and handle damage is closely linked to local or regional patterns of perception. This local view is grounded not only in different ways of socio-economic development in different regions of the world, but also in differences in cultural patterns. Also, the disturbance of the environment and climate causes relatively rapid social changes, in which the interpretation of symbols for the relationship between man and nature plays an important part.
The history of climate and culture, patterns of perception of environmental and climate change and an informed assessment of the future direction of environmental and climate policy in various parts of the world have to be taken into account in order to get to grips with the problem.
From a variety of angles, such as the history of ideas, historiography, the study of civilisation, and the political sciences, the monographs and edited volumes in Climate and Culture will all deal with the following questions:
• How do local and regional cultures perceive changes in the environment and climate in past and present?
• How did and do they adjust to them?
• How do their various representatives and spokesmen introduce their respective views to the global debate and into emerging international negotiating systems?

Fire, Security, and Modernities, 1400 to 1900
Over 8,200 large city fires broke out between 1000 and 1939 CE in Central Europe. Prometheus Tamed inquires into the long-term history of that fire ecology, its local and regional frequencies, its relationship to climate history. It asks for the visual and narrative representation of that threat in every-day life. Institutional forms of fire insurance emerged in the form of private joint stock companies (the British model, starting in 1681) or in the form of cameralist fire insurances (the German model, starting in 1676). They contributed to shape and change society, transforming old communities of charitable solidarity into risk communities, finally supplemented by networks of cosmopolite aid. After 1830, insurance agencies expanded tremendously quickly all over the globe: Cultural clashes of Western and native perceptions of fire risk and of what is insurance can be studied as part of a critical archaeology of world risk society and the plurality of modernities.
In: Prometheus Tamed 
In: Prometheus Tamed 
In: Prometheus Tamed 
In: Prometheus Tamed 
In: Prometheus Tamed 
In: Prometheus Tamed