Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Ancient History x
  • Status (Books): Temporarily Out of Stock x
Clear All
This fascicle, presenting fragmentary biographical texts of the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. is the first in a series of eight which will deal with all surviving fragments of ancient Greek biographical writing.
Before Greek biography emerged as a literary genre of its own at the beginning of the Hellenistic period, biographical interest already found expression in various other forms of literature. The testimonia and fragmenta edited, translated and commented in this fascicle illustrate the roots of the biographical genre.
In view of the themes which became prominent in later biographical writing, the fragments have been arranged thematically: traditions on the 'Seven Wise Men', on lives of philosophers, poets and politicians.

Die Fragmente der Griechischen Historiker is available in print, and now also online as part of the online reference work Jacoby Online. Please click here for more details.
This synthetic treatment of Josephus and his times has two aims. The first is to establish Josephus' attitudes to the various Judaean aristocratic groups of the first century - priests, descendants of Herod, certain sectarians - and how these attitudes changed. The second aim is more speculative: to connect these changes with actual changes in Judaean politics and society in the c. 30 years of Josephus' literary activity, a critical period of transformation following the destruction of Jerusalem.
The first chapter examines Josephus' life from his detection to Vespasian, and suggests that Josephus always retained an interest in current public affairs, particularly those of Judaea. Chapters 2-4 discuss the changes of attitude within the Josephan corpus and place them in the context of the evidence of the coins, inscriptions, Rabbinic literature and pagan historians. It is argued that these changes allow us to trace the decline of the pre-66 aristocracy groups after 70. Chapter 5 argues that there arose a new aristocracy in the 80s and 90s, a rise which left its mark in Josephus' later work.
His Vita and Development as a Historian
Josephus, a Palestinian Jew, authored Bellum Judaicum, which chronicled the Jewish revolt against Rome begun in 66 C.E. in Jerusalem, and roughly twenty years later wrote Antiquitates Judaicae, a study of Jewish history from the creation to 66 C.E. In both Bellum Judaicum and the Vita, an appendix to Antiquitates Judaicae, Josephus deals with his own role in the war. Although both works have apologetic aims, Josephus changes his story from one work to the next. By viewing these two works in the greater context of Josephus’s life and not in isolation from each other, Cohen traces Josephus’s development as a historian, as an apologist, and as a Jew. Cohen bases his historical reconstruction of Josephus’s participation in the war on a delineation of specific contradictions between the two works, a survey of the scholarship on the subject, a discussion of the literary relationship between the two documents, an investigation of how Josephus treated his sources, and a detailed analysis of both the Bellum Judaicum and the Vita. Comprehensive and contextual, this work will be of general interest to students and scholars of ancient Judaism and classical antiquity.

Please note that Josephus in Galilee and Rome was previously published by Brill in hardback (ISBN 90 04 05922 9, no longer available).
Aspects of Macedonian Imperialism
Kings and Colonists deals with Macedonian imperialism in the 4th-2nd centuries BCE, the time of King Philip II and Alexander the Great, and of the dynasties of Alexander's successors, with special emphasis on western Asia. The first part of the book examines the origins of Macedonian imperialism in Philip II's state-building activity, and discusses how the Macedonian rulers used propaganda to justify themselves to their Macedonian and Greek supporters, and how they interacted with the autonomous Greek cities. The second part examines different levels of the personnel of imperial control, trying to see in each case what these men contributed to and got out of the empire. A final chapter looks at the effects of this imperialism on the Macedonian homeland, countering some modern arguments that the empire had a disastrous effect on Macedonian manpower.
Myth, Misogyny and Reality
Ancient Stepmothers is the first full-length study of the stepmother in Graeco-Roman antiquity. Several perspectives are covered: literary, historical and sociological, the last-mentioned making use of comparative material from modern studies of stepfamilies.
The portrayal of the stepmother in myth and literature is thoroughly explored. The historical background in Athens and Rome is examined with a view to determining the relationship between fiction and real life.
The book makes an important contribution to the study of both literary history and family relationships: in particular, it sheds light on attitudes to women, the portrayal of the stepmother being an outstanding illustration of misogynistic prejudice. It will also interest sociologists wishing to place studies of the contemporary stepfamily in a wider historical context: for this reason, all Greek and Latin is translated into English.
The Ancestry of the Ancient Trireme
This book presents a new theory about the developments in shipping and naval organization that culminated in the invention - around 530 BC in the eastern Mediterranean - of the trireme, and the subsequent adoption of this first specialized warship of antiquity by all the naval powers of the time.
New interpretations are proposed of Greek and Assyrian iconographic data and of hitherto ignored evidence in Herodotos and Thukydides, the non-military factors determining developments are emphasized. Thukydides' fundamental essay on the genesis of Greek sea-powers is studied in depth, the rarity of these sea-powers stressed, and the peculiar background of the naval power of Phokaia and the Samian tyrant Polykrates exposed. The problem of the trireme's place of origin, the factors determining its invention, probably in Saïte Egypt, and its immediate adoption by the Persian king Kambyses are discussed. The first naval operations of the Persians are surveyed, reasons and circumstances of the trireme's introduction into the navies of the Greek city-states analysed with special attention for Themistokles' navy bill.
The book offers ancient historians and classical philologists a radically new approach to archaic maritime and naval history. It will also be useful to (nautical) archaeologists.
Sales of Public Land in Lykourgan Athens
The Rationes Centesimarum, inscribed accounts of a 1 percent tax paid on sales of land by Attic corporate groups (demes, phratries etc.) to individual Athenian citizens in the 4th century B.C., are an important source for the social and economic history o f classical Athens. Although some of the fragments have been known for over a century, this book is the first comprehensive edition. In addition to a new fragment, published here for the first time, it contains revised texts of the 15 fragments already k nown, based on a fresh autopsy of the stones. This has resulted in many new readings and a new arrangement of the fragments into stelai. A translation in tabular form is followed by a textual and epigraphical commentary and full notes on the 150+ indivi duals and the 60+ corporate groups mentioned in the records, a number of them identified for the first time. Prosopographical analysis enables likely dates for the sales to be established to within a few years. This forms the basis for a final discussion chapter, which identifies the inscriptions as records of a centrally organised land sale programme probably attributable to the leading Athenian financial administrator, Lykourgos.
Editor: Paul Erdkamp
Contents: PART ONE : SUPPLYING THE ROMAN ARMIES HERZ, P.: Die Logistik der kaiserzeitlichen Armee. Strukturelle Überlegungen. ERDKAMP, P.: The Corn Supply of the Roman Armies during the Principate (27 BC - 235 AD). CARRERAS MONTFORT, C.: The Roman military supply during the Principate. Transportation and staples. BLOIS, L. DE: Monetary policies, the soldiers’ pay and the onset of crisis in the first half of the third century AD. PART TWO : COMMUNICATIONS AND TRANSPORT HAYNES, I.: Britain’s First Information Revolution. The Roman army and the transformation of economic life. KISSEL, Th.: Road-building as a munus publicum. KOLB, A.: Army and transport. PART THREE : THE ROMAN WEST: HISPANIA, BRITANNIA AND GERMANIA DAVIES. J.L.: Soldiers, peasants, industry and towns. The Roman army in Britain. A Welsh perspective. WHITTAKER, C.R.: Supplying the army. Evidence from Vindolanda. FUNARI, P.P.A.: The consumption of olive oil in Roman Britain and the role of the army. WIERSCHOWSKI, L.: Das römische Heer und die ökonomische Entwicklung Germaniens in den ersten Jahrzehnten des 1. Jahrhunderts. REMESAL RODRIGUEZ, J.: Baetica and Germania. Notes on the concept of ‘provincial interdependence’ in the Roman Empire. KONEN, H.: Die ökonomische Bedeutung der Provinzialflotten während der Zeit des Prinzipates. PART FOUR : NORTH AFRICA AND THE EAST MORIZOT, P.: Impact de l’armée romaine sur l’économie de l’Afrique. ROTH, J.: The army and the economy in Judaea and Palestine. ALSTON, R.: Managing the frontiers. Supplying the frontier troops in the sixth and seventh centuries.