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In Augustine and Plotinus: the Human Mind as Image of the Divine Laela Zwollo provides an inside view of two of the most influential thinkers of late antiquity: the Christian Augustine and the Neo-Platonist Plotinus. By exploring the finer points and paradoxes of their doctrines of the image of God (the human soul/intellect), the illustrious church father’s complex interaction with his most important non-biblical source comes into focus. In order to fathom Augustine, we should first grasp the beauty in Plotinus’ philosophy and its attractiveness to Christians. This monograph will contribute to a better understanding of the formative years of Christianity as well as later ancient philosophy. It can serve as a handbook for becoming acquainted with the two thinkers, as well as for delving into the profundity of their thought.
Erudite and urbane, a scion of the Peripatos, Demetrius of Phalerum dominated Athenian political life for a decade (317-307 B.C.E.) with Macedonian support. Viewed by some as the embodiment of the longed-for 'philosopher-king', Demetrius has been seen a test case for the interplay of philosophical training and political praxis in antiquity. This book, through a close re-examination of the fragmentary and diffuse testimonia for Demetrius’ decade, argues that such a view misunderstands his legislative, constitutional and financial reforms, which should rather be seen within the context of Macedonian suzerainty, Athenian self-interest, and contemporary social changes. Such a context also affords a better understanding of the dynamic relations between the Macedonian generals and the preeminent Greek city at the dawn of the Hellenistic era.
L’évolution de la figure du bon prince sous le Haut-Empire
In Pouvoir impérial et vertus philosophiques. L’évolution de la figure du bon prince sous le Haut-Empire, Anne Gangloff offers a thorough analysis of the Roman political thought, examining the way in which the good prince is described from the Julio-Claudians to the end of the third century. Her focus is on the evolution of the prince’s virtues, on the communication of these virtues, and on relationships between the prince and the intellectuals in his entourage. She highlights the emergence of a real tradition of Roman political thought, which influenced more or less emperors themselves. Dans Pouvoir impérial et vertus philosophiques. L’évolution de la figure du bon prince sous le Haut-Empire, Anne Gangloff propose une analyse précise de la pensée politique romaine, à travers la manière dont la figure du bon prince est décrite depuis les Julio-Claudiens jusqu’à la fin du IIIe siècle. Sont examinés l’évolution et la communication des vertus du prince, ainsi que les rapports entre celui-ci et les intellectuels de son entourage. La naissance d’une véritable tradition de pensée politique romaine, qui a exercé plus ou moins d’influence sur les empereurs eux-mêmes, est ainsi mise en lumière.
Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Münster 2012)
Since 1971, the International Congress for Neo-Latin Studies has been organised every three years in various cities in Europe and North America. In August 2012, Münster in Germany was the venue of the fifteenth Neo-Latin conference, held by the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies. The proceedings of the Münster conference have been collected in this volume under the motto „ Litterae neolatinae, sedes et quasi domicilia rerum religiosarum et politicarum – Religion and Politics in Neo-Latin Literature”. Forty-five individual and five plenary papers spanning the period from the Renaissance to the present offer a variety of themes covering a range of genres such as history, literature, philology, art history, and religion. The contributions will be of relevance not only for scholarly readers, but also for an interested non-professional audience.
Hippocratic Tradition, Manipulation, Innovation
In Galen’s Theory of Black Bile: Hippocratic Tradition, Manipulation, Innovation Keith Stewart investigates Galen’s writing on black bile to explain health and disease and shows that Galen sometimes presented this humour as three substances with different properties that can either be harmful or beneficial to the body. Keith Stewart analyses the most important treatises for Galen’s physical description and characteristion of black bile and challenges certain views on the development of this humour, such as the importance of the content of the Hippocratic On the Nature of Man. This analysis allows us to understand how and why Galen defines and uses black bile in different ways for his arguments that cannot always be reconciled with the content of his sources.