In: Post-Western Revolution in Sociology
In: Global Hakka
In: Migrating Fujianese

Abstract

The postcolonial realm has produced global cities and massive diasporas. Global movement exponentially accelerates; this, however, is not solely due to the processes of capitalist globalization, a top down fluidity, but often in spite of it. The following chapter traces several theories of ‘autonomy of migration’ through a Spinozian lens. Through the works of Mezzadra, Mitropoulos, Papadopoulos, and many others, political agency is revealed in the processes of migration and its concurrent challenges to the confinement and control of capitalist structures, the state, and other forms of power. In opposition to the works of theorists such as Agamben and Arendt, this paper attempts to provide a concept of politics and ‘rights’ that do not require either a polis or transcendental duty bearer. The migrant is explored as fundamentally in opposition to political exclusion: a stateless politics is revealed.


In: Dislocating Globality
In: Finance Capital Today
In: Post-Western Revolution in Sociology
Author: Maria Halouva

Abstract

Despite the recent financial crisis and zeal for austerity measures, the social enterprise model is continuously hailed as the local grassroots, organisational solution for both the empowerment and development of the poor. On the one hand it is a market-friendly model that answers to UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s call for the Big Society and on the other hand, a democratic answer to autonomy. This chapter tracks the growth 
of the social enterprise to the universal figure of the rational entrepreneur that 
largely stemmed from the global neoliberalisation of development. Through the lens of the global-is-local, the political social implications of Aboriginal management in domestic policy undoubtedly coexist with the rise of the social enterprise in Indigenous Australia.


In: Dislocating Globality
In: Finance Capital Today

Abstract

The chapter examines local understandings of intellectual disability among Ecuadorian families. It argues that a global imposition of concepts and definitions of disability have blurred the local knowledge acquired in time and space by families. It also enquires about the strategies that disabled families and their impaired members have developed to negotiate, to accept, to reject or to confront global discourses that are present in such a construction. Misinterpretations of family practices in the so-called countries of the South have been globally disseminated creating the image of disabled families’ life as linear and invariable. In this chapter, intellectual disability has been analysed as a local construct that although it responds to professional, bureaucratic, moral and cultural categories; a category of intimacy and mutuality could have been adopted by families to resist a globalising process of professional domination. Consequently, more ethnographic research is needed in order to unveil the impact of global definitions on disabled families and to rescue local knowledge and intimate experiences of intellectual disability. 


In: Dislocating Globality

Abstract

This chapter is an initial exploration into the multiple ‘reals’ that the logic of zero, as manifest in Western economics, is at work in. In the spirit of postcolonial radicality and through enlisting post-Marxist psychoanalytical modes of scrutiny it seeks to disassemble the capitalist edifice, breaking apart its supposed univocity. It argues that high capital is totalising only in the field of its own speaking position. It explores neo-liberal fiscal governance as a subjectivising programme and compares it to value systems whose ontologies are outside of ‘the West’, thereby postulating that it is at the level of the subjectivisation of the individual that resistance to ‘Western’ hegemony must be thought. It argues that no longer can such resistance be posited at the level of a unitary capital vs. multiple but equally lumpen and subjugated subalterns.


In: Dislocating Globality