In: Entanglements and Weavings: Diffractive Approaches to Gender and Love
In: The Horizons of Being
In: Blurred: Selves Made and Selves Making
In: Disintegration: Bad Love, Collective Suicide, and the Idols of Imperial Twilight

Abstract

This chapter engages Angela Carter with new feminist thought, paying close attention to her creation of nomadic subjectivities in The Passion of New Eve. Carter’s novel explores the possibilities offered by “becoming-minority/ nomad/ molecular/ bodies-without-organs/ woman” (, 192) revealed in love. Going beyond questions of desire and pleasure in her examination of love, Carter suggests that equitable love is possible only when gender is imagined differently. This must involve a radical re-thinking of the subject, and subjectivity, from one that is unitary and fully known, to one that is never fully known, existing always as potential, and revealed only in relation to others, but also as a relation to others.

In: Entanglements and Weavings: Diffractive Approaches to Gender and Love
Author: Ondřej Krása

Abstract

Bodies are shown to be related to something else from the very beginning of Timaeus’ speech. The original twofold distinction between being and becoming is later on expanded by the addition of a third kind. In this paper, I try to shed some light on the relationship between bodies and the third kind. In the passage dealing with the three kinds (48a–53b) relationship between bodies and the third kind has three prominent facets. First, bodies are “in” the third kind as in a receptacle or container. Second, bodies are modifications of the third kind and therefore parts of the third kind are bodies themselves. Third, bodies are modifications of the third kind that do not prevent other modifications from taking place. At the end of the section 48a–53b, the third kind is identified with space, and starting from line 53b bodies are shown to have a geometrical nature. From this perspective, we can see how the first two facets of the relationship of bodies to the third kind are materialized: a geometrical figure is both in space and it is a modification of space. However, Timaeus’ third characterization of this relationship cannot be explained from this perspective. This inconsistency is due to the different connotations of bodies in both passages. In the passage dealing with the three kinds, bodies are shown to be an utterly dependent image of the eternal paradigm in the receptacle. In the passage dealing with geometrical nature of bodies, body is shown to be an independent and self-sufficient geometrical structure. Neither of these connotations should be rejected, and it is clear that Plato wants us to think about body as an image of eternal being, whose specific independence has a geometrical nature.

In: Plato’s Timaeus
Author: Serena Petrella

Abstract

This chapter contributes to studies of gender, intimacy and love, by testing the “strong” New Materialist proposition that bodies and matter matter, are agentic, intra-act and influence social and cultural processes. By drawing upon Pierre Bourdieu’s Field Theory, and the “discreet” new materialism of sociologists Pam Alldred and Nick Fox, the chapter positions itself against this proposition by taking a more nuanced approach, proposing instead that non-human agents, and most importantly, fields, are entities that can have material effects. This proposition rests on an analysis of gender management and the influence of space in the bdsm club based on a cluster of ethnographic studies that have approached bdsm practice as a form of erotic collective life, and studied communities that come together in specialised public spaces.

In: Entanglements and Weavings: Diffractive Approaches to Gender and Love
Author: Kelly Gardiner

Abstract

This chapter is a work of auto-/biography and a mapping of the literary and cultural history of one form of female masculinity. From early crossdressers to 1950s sharp suits, from 1990s androgyny to tomboy chic, how has butch represented the material and fluid, overt and covert, performer and spectator, gender and love? Taking a broad view of materiality, it traces ways of being visible in the world, exploring the physicality of rebellion and of desire. It attempts to map events and entanglements, not to force them into relationships with each other, but rather to recognize the cultural work of queer resistance.

In: Entanglements and Weavings: Diffractive Approaches to Gender and Love
Proceedings of the Tenth Symposium Platonicum Pragense
Plato's 'Timaeus' brings together a number of studies from both leading Plato specialists and up-and-coming researchers from across Europe. The contributions cover a wide variety of topics, ranging from the literary form of the work to the ontology of sense perception and the status of medicine in Timaeus' account. Although informed by a commitment to methodological diversity, the collection as a whole forms an organic unity, opening fresh perspectives on widely read passages, while shedding new light on less frequently discussed topics. The volume thus provides a valuable resource for students and researchers at all levels, whether their interest bears on the Timaeus as a whole or on a particular passage.
In: Resignation and Ecstasy: The Moral Geometry of Collective Self-Destruction