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In: Divine Causality and Human Free Choice
In: Restoration through Redemption: John Calvin Revisited
In: The Eucharistic Theology of Edward Bouverie Pusey
In: Problem and Promise in Colin E. Gunton's Doctrine of Creation
In: Jewish Jesus Research and its Challenge to Christology Today
In: The Doctrine of God in Reformed Orthodoxy, Karl Barth, and the Utrecht School
In: The Chinese Christology of T. C. Chao
Author: Amos Yong

Abstract

The argument in this introductory chapter of this book triangulates around three sets of interlocking questions and methodological intuitions. The Buddhist-Christian dialogue contributes to certain developments in the science and philosophy of nature, including anthropology, by introducing pneumatological and relational categories into the discussion. The task is to expand the theology and science dialogue and the Buddhist-Christian dialogue into a trialogue between Christianity, Buddhism, and science. The three parts of the chapter clarifies the methodological challenges involved, first with regard to discussions in the science and philosophy of nature, and then about developments in the interfaith dialogue, before suggesting how a pneumatological approach to these matters has the potential to advance this exploration. The chapter covers a good deal of ground results in this being one of the longest chapters of the book, but this is needed in order to explicate the threefold chord around which the trialogue unfolds.

In: The Cosmic Breath
In: Francis A. Sullivan, S.J. and Ecclesiological Hermeneutics