Pauline Sameshima, Roxanne Vandermause, Stephen Chalmers and Gabriel

Mary Beattie

Mary Beattie

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John Dewey

Discerning from the beginning to its end, Art as Experience is still one of the most comprehensive thesis for art educators and policy makers alike. Testing, questioning, and tough, it examines what embodies a thriving and healthy society, and argues that art education is essential to such conditions. Dewey claims correctly that art education can never be a literal experience, a leveller, a rule, a matter of reason alone or a moral function and cannot be governed by charts, bureaucracy, conventionality, and statistics. For education this has major consequences about how art should be taught. Dewey is adamant: art is in the lead in what constitutes new vision. To be able to pluck the benefits of this art for our social system of education, Dewey maintains, as this chapter will explore, that art teaching must revolve around what Art as Experience evokes in its nature.

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Herbert Read

Throughout his career Herbert Read worked tirelessly for peace in the world. At the time when he was working with UNESCO during its infancy he was already exploring the idea of art-for-peace. A prolific writer, editor, poet, academic, teacher, curator, activist, art reviewer, historian, and defender of children, Read is one of education’s towering figures. His educational thinking was based on a lifetime of research in psychology, psychoanalysts, poetry, philosophy, educational theory, and children’s art. In 1943 at the height of his powers, Read shook the educational establishment with his book Education Through Art. This publication marked a turning point and is still one of those few historic benchmarks that actually mean something in the culture of education. In this chapter I will pursue Read’s conception of Education Through Art. I will be arguing that what children embody through their art, as Read thought, represents part of the filial bond of education. Read’s particular insight into this filial bond is an aspiring account of the virtues of aesthetic education.

Bonnie Raingruber

Mary Beattie