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La materialidad de la escritura en las literaturas ibéricas de la Edad Media a la temprana modernidad
How is a body written, and in which ways can literary texts shed light on the tension between immediate bodily expressions and writing if medieval writing practices compete with the new technology of printing? The present volume Escritura somática: La materialidad de la escritura en las literaturas ibéricas de la Edad Media a la temprana modernidad explores the relations between corporality and writing in genres and discourses that are key for understanding the phenomenon. The Iberian perspective, including contributions on Spanish and Portuguese texts, focusses on the materiality of writing with a shared epistemic frame.

Contributors are Isabel de Barros Dias, Stephanie Béreiziat-Lang, Juan Casas Rigall, Robert Folger, Juan Pablo Mauricio García Álvarez, Miguel García-Bermejo Giner, Folke Gernert, Santiago Gutiérrez García, Simon Kroll, Miriam Palacios Larrosa, Adrián J. Sáez, and Margarida Santos Alpalhão.
The Iberian Book World in the First Half of the Seventeenth Century
Within just a generation or two of its arrival, print had become a ubiquitous and spirited part of Spain and Portugal’s urban cultures. It serviced an ever-expanding reading public, as well as many and varied practical quotidian needs. Its impact on society was multi-dimensional and complex, and its social reach far broader than the civic or ecclesiastical elites were ever to be entirely comfortable with.
This cross-disciplinary volume of essays focuses on the maturing marketplace for print in the first half of the seventeenth century, shedding new light on some important transformations, with authors and publishers seizing opportunities available to them – negotiating the regulatory efforts of the censors, and scrambling to reconfigure their relationship with their readers.
In Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London) Nicolás Bas examines the image of Spain in eighteenth-century Europe, and in Paris and London in particular. His material has been scoured from an exhaustive interrogation of the records of the book trade. He refers to booksellers’ catalogues, private collections, auctions, and other sources of information in order to reconstruct the country’s cultural image. Rarely have these sources been searched for Spanish books, and never have they been as exhaustively exploited as they are in Bas’ book.
Both England and France were conversant with some very negative ideas about Spain. The Black Legend, dating back to the sixteenth century, condemned Spain as repressive and priest-ridden. Bas shows however, that an alternative, more sympathetic, vision ran parallel with these negative views. His bibliographical approach brings to light the Spanish books that were bought, sold and ultimately read. The impression thus obtained is likely to help us understand not only Spain’s past, but also something of its present.
In: Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London)
In: Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London)
In: Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London)
In: Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London)
In: Spanish Books in the Europe of the Enlightenment (Paris and London)