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This book concerns the ancient rock-cut monuments carved throughout the Near East, paying particular attention to the fate of these monuments in the centuries after their initial production. As parts of the landscapes in which they were carved, they acquired new meanings in the cultural memory of the people living around them. The volume joins numerous recent studies on the reception of historical texts and artefacts, exploring the peculiar affordances of these long-lasting and often salient monuments. The volume gathers articles by archeologists, art historians, and philologists, covering the entire Near East, from Iran to Lebanon and from Turkey to Egypt. It also analyzes long-lasting textual traditions that aim to explain the origins and meaning of rock-cut monuments and other related carvings.
Ancient Israelite and Early Jewish Literature offers more than simply an introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible). The Hebrew Bible remains not only the primary quantitative source for our knowledge of the literature of Ancient Israel, it also enjoys decisive religious and cultural significance for both Judaism and Christianity. However, increased interest in Early Judaism as successor to the religion of Ancient Israel and background to the New Testament demands an introduction that guides the reader through the maze of Jewish literature dating from the Hellenistic and Early Roman periods.
This introduction primarily offers a literary and historical-critical approach to the material it treats. Given the nature of certain Ancient Israelite inscriptions, the books of the Hebrew bible and the texts of Early Judaism, however, it contains some religio-historical or theological explanations where appropriate. In particular, the literary-historical analysis found in this volume underlines the canonical character of the Hebrew Bible.
The book concludes with a helpful appendix that briefly explains technical concepts and exegetical methods.
Ancient Israelite and Early Jewish Literature offers more than simply an introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible). The Hebrew Bible remains not only the primary quantitative source for our knowledge of the literature of Ancient Israel, it also enjoys decisive religious and cultural significance for both Judaism and Christianity. However, increased interest in Early Judaism as successor to the religion of Ancient Israel and background to the New Testament demands an introduction that guides the reader through the maze of Jewish literature dating from the Hellenistic and Early Roman periods.
This introduction primarily offers a literary and historical-critical approach to the material it treats. Given the nature of certain Ancient Israelite inscriptions, the books of the Hebrew bible and the texts of Early Judaism, however, it contains some religio-historical or theological explanations where appropriate. In particular, the literary-historical analysis found in this volume underlines the canonical character of the Hebrew Bible.
The book concludes with a helpful appendix that briefly explains technical concepts and exegetical methods.
Author: Montes Peral
A Study in the Social History of the Jewish People in the Hellenistic-Roman Period. Tr. from the Hebrew by I.H. Levine
Author: Oppenheimer
Contributor: Levine
Author: Gerber
Contra Apionem, the last known work by the Jewish author Flavius Josephus (38 - ca. 100 CE), is the only direct Jewish apology, that remains from antiquity. It is of special interest to us, because in its third part Josephus undertakes to explain the main ideas and laws of Judaism and its "theocratic" constitution to non-Jewish readers.
This volume gives an introduction to Contra Apionem as a whole, a German translation, and a precise analysis and interpretation of the work's third part on Judaism, especially its meaning for non-Jewish readers.
This study gives the reader access to an aspect of Josephus and to a part of his important work Contra Apionem, which, to date, have not attracted sufficient scholarly attention.
Author: Gnuse
This volume analyzes the understanding of dreams and the corresponding literary forms used by Josephus in his writings. Josephus reports dreams as either auditory message dreams, symbolic visual dreams, or dream image appearances. In this regard he uses the format for auditory and visual dreams found in ancient Near Eastern and biblical texts, while his dream image appearance reports show familiarity with traditional Greek modes of reporting dreams.
Close attention is given to the following topics: 1) the development of dream reports in the ancient Near East, the Bible, and the Hellenistic world; 2) Josephus' views on dreams and prophecy; 3) a form-critical assessment of Josephus' dream reports; and 4) an evaluation of Josephan dream reports which exhibit a more complex traditio-historical development.