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Abstract

The postcolonial realm has produced global cities and massive diasporas. Global movement exponentially accelerates; this, however, is not solely due to the processes of capitalist globalization, a top down fluidity, but often in spite of it. The following chapter traces several theories of ‘autonomy of migration’ through a Spinozian lens. Through the works of Mezzadra, Mitropoulos, Papadopoulos, and many others, political agency is revealed in the processes of migration and its concurrent challenges to the confinement and control of capitalist structures, the state, and other forms of power. In opposition to the works of theorists such as Agamben and Arendt, this paper attempts to provide a concept of politics and ‘rights’ that do not require either a polis or transcendental duty bearer. The migrant is explored as fundamentally in opposition to political exclusion: a stateless politics is revealed.


In: Dislocating Globality
Author: Maria Halouva

Abstract

Despite the recent financial crisis and zeal for austerity measures, the social enterprise model is continuously hailed as the local grassroots, organisational solution for both the empowerment and development of the poor. On the one hand it is a market-friendly model that answers to UK Prime Minister David Cameron’s call for the Big Society and on the other hand, a democratic answer to autonomy. This chapter tracks the growth 
of the social enterprise to the universal figure of the rational entrepreneur that 
largely stemmed from the global neoliberalisation of development. Through the lens of the global-is-local, the political social implications of Aboriginal management in domestic policy undoubtedly coexist with the rise of the social enterprise in Indigenous Australia.


In: Dislocating Globality

Abstract

The chapter examines local understandings of intellectual disability among Ecuadorian families. It argues that a global imposition of concepts and definitions of disability have blurred the local knowledge acquired in time and space by families. It also enquires about the strategies that disabled families and their impaired members have developed to negotiate, to accept, to reject or to confront global discourses that are present in such a construction. Misinterpretations of family practices in the so-called countries of the South have been globally disseminated creating the image of disabled families’ life as linear and invariable. In this chapter, intellectual disability has been analysed as a local construct that although it responds to professional, bureaucratic, moral and cultural categories; a category of intimacy and mutuality could have been adopted by families to resist a globalising process of professional domination. Consequently, more ethnographic research is needed in order to unveil the impact of global definitions on disabled families and to rescue local knowledge and intimate experiences of intellectual disability. 


In: Dislocating Globality

Abstract

This chapter is an initial exploration into the multiple ‘reals’ that the logic of zero, as manifest in Western economics, is at work in. In the spirit of postcolonial radicality and through enlisting post-Marxist psychoanalytical modes of scrutiny it seeks to disassemble the capitalist edifice, breaking apart its supposed univocity. It argues that high capital is totalising only in the field of its own speaking position. It explores neo-liberal fiscal governance as a subjectivising programme and compares it to value systems whose ontologies are outside of ‘the West’, thereby postulating that it is at the level of the subjectivisation of the individual that resistance to ‘Western’ hegemony must be thought. It argues that no longer can such resistance be posited at the level of a unitary capital vs. multiple but equally lumpen and subjugated subalterns.


In: Dislocating Globality

Abstract

This chapter is devoted to the following questions: what is a composite monoculture? How does it form structures and order things? What sort of new composite human do these structures and orders produce? The composite monoculture controls schemes of thinking and processes of desire through a super-marketization of society and the creation of a symbolically centralized democracy – how is this achieved? These questions are based on the presumption that production, distribution, and consumption are schematized practices of thinking, which form a system of persuasion; therefore, the article considers not only material, but also ideational products. With this in mind, the concept of production is separated into the following categories: universal, mass, monopolizing, totalitarian, global, and composite monocultural components. The concept of monoculturality signals a kind of production independent of the traditional capitalist production monopolists, small businesses, and state economies. Monoculturality concerns not only goods, but also demands, desires, and ideas; it makes unities of human beings. The article seeks to explain why people choose and trust symbols, names, pictures, and theories common to many countries, institutions, and groups, and why they like to be monads that eschew swarms of qualities. Monoculturality is considered a subaltern form that can be interpreted similarly to concepts such as Herbert Marcuse’s one-dimensional man, Guy Debord’s society of the spectacle, Jean Baudrillard’s simulacrums, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s desiring machines, and the global imaginary as theorized by Bhaskar Mukhopadhyay. Super-marketization is interpreted as the main principle for moulding life into a monoculture. It produces deserts of culture by spreading the same names, symbols, goods, and orders into large territories, which produces an illusion of diversity that hides the monoculturality lying at core of contemporary thinking and behaviour. However, anthropologists and new critical nomads see the diversity for what it is – an illusion – and see the potentially disastrous results of the growth of a composite monoculture and its super-marketization. These anthropologists and nomads seek to build new structures for understanding the world. This article underscores the importance of obscurity, self-othering, transgression, and creative disruptions as key means for providing unique cultural and life niches. The main thesis here is that the dialectic of host-and-guest in the deinstitutionalized process of open organizations and through the dynamics of creative groups can help to resist the tendencies borne of monoculturality. 


In: Dislocating Globality

Abstract

This chapter explores the idea of the proliferation of heterotopian emplacements under conditions of globalization, seeing it as a spatial transformation. Utilizing theories from Foucault, and Deleuze and Guattari, among others, the chapter raises questions about possible alternative ways of existence that oppose themselves to the monocultural tendencies of globalization. It looks at the process of consumption, and the spaces in which consumption unfolds, emphasizing the desire of global brands and simultaneous desire for the Other. In addition to exploring the ideas of spatial transformation and possibilities of nomadic thought as opposed to one-dimensional thought, the chapter offers reflections on experiencing of wandering in transforming spaces, in particular in New Delhi, India.


In: Dislocating Globality
Author: Jeanne Kay

Abstract

This essay argues that the iconic ‘Je suis Charlie’ slogan is representative of a typically French political tradition which is imbued with colonialist remnants and state racism. In the first section I delineate the ancestry of ‘Je suis Charlie’ in the French political imaginary; I then examine the ethics of identification through the prism of French assimilationism and republican principles; the third section develops the argument that ‘Je suis Charlie’ is a pledge of allegiance within the context of the Clash of Civilizations; and finally the Charlie event is contextualized within the current French political reactionary environment.


In: Dislocating Globality
Author: Allie Biswas

Abstract

This essay explores how notions relating to the local and global are articulated in the works of the artist Subodh Gupta. I also consider how such terms relate to the notion of ‘Indianness.’ My examination is grounded within materiality, in particular the stainless steel utensils that have become the artist’s primary, most well-known medium. This material is a culturally-specific phenomenon, located in a number of contexts within India (Gupta’s country of origin). It is also associated with Gupta’s ascent, when he became globally renowned in the mid-to-late 2000s, gaining recognition through his stainless steel sculptures and installations, as well as paintings depicting such objects.


In: Dislocating Globality
Author: Némésis Srour

Abstract

In the early 2000s, two phenomena emerged at the same time: the sprouting in Lebanon of a video clip industry that spread throughout the Arab world and the recognition, in the field of contemporary art, of a new class of video artists from the region. A study of these two antithetical visual forms, which differ both aesthetically, and in their resources (technical, economic) and purpose, revealed the same paradoxical logic of a ‘deterritorialized’ image, in a place where the notion of territory is a recurring pattern of both political and symbolic lives. Through the convergence of image and sound, games of dissonance work to eliminate the congruence between identity and national territory, and open the Arab world to other resonances, in an act of resistance to traditional boundaries.


In: Dislocating Globality
Author: Mara Matta

Abstract

This paper aims at discussing the complex processes of identity (re)construction and trans-acculturation experienced by a young homosexual Bangladeshi who migrated to Italy to provide economic relief to his impoverished family and to create a ‘new life’ (notun jibon) for himself. Whilst Bangladesh accepted and left unquestioned the Section 377 of the Penal Code firstly introduced by the British in 1860 that criminalises homosexuality under the category of ‘Unnatural Offences’, the Italian legal system is yet to implement legal provisions to tackle the issue of homophobia. Faced with harassment by his own countrymen, fear of assault by other migrants, racism by some narrow-minded Italians, contemptuous attitude by the local police, ostracism inside the local mosque’s, Zakir has now to choose if he wants to stay in Italy, despite all the odds, and live an oxymoronic ‘free life’ as an asylum seeker, or go back to Bangladesh, where he faces the threat of life in prison. Following Zakir’s narratives of migration, this article tries to highlight the difficulties of coming to terms with multiple identities in transnational settings, where cultural positionalities impede real social mobility and push the ‘absurd heroes’ of our times to find a new space where to inhabit their resignified homo/migrant identity.


In: Dislocating Globality