Browse results

In: Migrants, Refugees, and Asylum Seekers in Latin America
In: Migrants, Refugees, and Asylum Seekers in Latin America
In: Migrants, Refugees, and Asylum Seekers in Latin America
In: Migrants, Refugees, and Asylum Seekers in Latin America
In: Nationalism before the Nation State
Author: Ellen Pilsworth

Abstract

This chapter explores the moral dilemmas encountered by the Enlightenment writer and pedagaogue Rudolph Zacharias Becker around the concepts of nationalism and war. His meticulous selection and adaptation of texts for the two editions of his Mildheimisches Liederbuch (an originally pedagogical work designed to teach peasants more Enlightened ways of thinking) reveal the issues of war and nationalism to have been greatly troubling for him, yet also, unfortunately, unavoidable. While the first edition of Mildheimisches Liederbuch in 1799 treated war as a moral problem, the second edition in 1815 contained a great many new songs proclaiming the anti-French and pro-war sentiments that had arisen during the Wars of Liberation, even though his personal memoir from this period argued for tolerance and respect of the French. Why, then, did he include this anti-French material in the 1815 collection? I interpret Becker’s choice to include pro-war texts with which he did not agree as an attempt to respect freedom of different political opinions, rather than to censor and control them, in the aftermath of Napoleonic occupation.

In: Nationalism before the Nation State
Editor: Nick Baron
Across Eastern Europe and Russia in the first half of the twentieth century, conflict and violence arising out of foreign and civil wars, occupation, revolutions, social and ethnic restructuring and racial persecution caused countless millions of children to be torn from their homes. Displaced Children in Russia and Eastern Europe, 1915-1953 addresses the powerful and tragic history of child displacement in this region and the efforts of states, international organizations and others to ‘re-place’ uprooted, and often orphaned, children. By analysing the causes, character and course of child displacement, and examining through first-person testimonies the children’s experiences and later memories, the chapters in this volume shed new light on twentieth-century nation-building, social engineering and the emergence of modern concepts and practices of statehood, children’s rights and humanitarianism.

Contributors are: Tomas Balkelis, Rachel Faircloth Green, Gabriel Finder, Michael Kaznelson, Aldis Purs, Karl D. Qualls, Elizabeth White, Tara Zahra
Volume 18 in the series Yearbook of the Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies is entitled Exile and Gender II: Politics, Education and the Arts. It is edited by Charmian Brinson, Jana Barbora Buresova and Andrea Hammel, and is intended as a companion volume to Volume 17, which focused on literature and the press. This new volume considers the life and work of exiled women politicians, academics and artists, among others, examining the ways – both positive and negative - in which their exile affected them. The sixteen contributions, which are in English or German, set out to throw new light on aspects of gendered relations and experiences of women in exile in Great Britain and Ireland.

Contributors are: Jana Barbora Buresova, Rachel Dickson, Inge Hansen-Schaberg, Gisela Holfter, Hadwig Kraeutler, Ulrike Krippner, Dieter Krohn, Gertrud Lenz, Bea Lewkowicz, Sarah MacDougall, John March, Iris Meder, Irene Messenger, Merilyn Moos, Felicitas M. Starr-Egger, Jennifer Taylor, Gaby Weiner.
Author: Dagmar Paulus

Abstract

This chapter discusses Briefe auf einer Reise nach Petersburg an Freunde geschrieben [Letters to Friends from a Journey to Petersburg], by writer and traveller Fanny Tarnow (1779–1862). First published in 1819, this travelogue contains two discourses of exclusion: one based on gender and the other on culture. Tarnow is victim of the former and complicit in the latter. On the one hand, the difficulties faced by Tarnow as a female writer resonate throughout her text. As a woman who had the audacity not only to write and publish but also to travel and live abroad for two years, Tarnow was acutely aware of the restrictions placed upon her based on her gender. On the other hand, however, she constructs a notion of German national identity in contrast to the perceived Otherness, and inferiority, of Russia. Tarnow, in this context, makes use of common national stereotypes that were already virulent at the time, and even claims that nature in Russia is fundamentally different and inferior to German nature. Hence, her letters from Petersburg oscillate between confident self-assertion as a German (and therefore, ‘inherently superior’ to her Russian counterparts) and self-conscious justification as a female author-traveller (and therefore, ‘inherently inferior’ to her male counterparts).

In: Nationalism before the Nation State
In: Nationalism before the Nation State