The essays in Visualizing the Past in Italian Renaissance Art address a foundational concept that was as central to early modern thinking as it is to our own: that the past is always an important part of the present. Written by the friends, students, and colleagues of Dr. Brian Curran, former professor of Art History at the Pennsylvania State University, these authors demonstrate how reverberations of the past within the present are intrinsic to the ways in which we think about the history of art. Examinations of sculpture, painting, and architecture reveal the myriad ways that history has been appropriated, reinvented, and rewritten as subsequent generations—including the authors collected here—have attained new insight into the past and present.

Contributors include Denise Costanzo, William E. Wallace, Theresa A. Kutasz Christensen, Ingrid Rowland, Anthony Cutler, Marilyn Aronberg Lavin, Louis Alexander Waldman, Elizabeth Petersen Cyron, Stuart Lingo, Jessica Boehman, Katherine M. Bentz, Robin L. Thomas, and John Pinto.
Sculpture in Print, 1480-1600 is the first monograph dedicated to the intriguing history of the translation of statues and reliefs into print. The multitude of engravings, woodcuts and etchings show a highly creative handling of the ‘original’ antique or contemporary work of art. The essays in this volume reflect these various approaches to and challenges of translating sculpture in print. They analyze foremost the beginnings of the phenomenon in Italian and Northern Renaissance prints and they highlight by means of case studies amongst many other topics the interrelated terminology between sculpture and print, lost models in print, the inventive handling of fragments, as well as the transformation of statues into narrative contexts.
Artful Works and Dialogue about Art as Experience
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art, and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Cristina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Visual Literacy
Editor: Julia Lane
Tracing Behind the Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Visual Literacy, discusses how our relationship to images, collectively and individually, is constantly shifting, as we adapt to the evolving image economy of our increasingly screen-based world. This volume offers pedagogies, analyses and strategies for developing visual literacy across education and industry.

The language of images embodies highly complex and nuanced statements and readings, the ability to invent and reinvent, it is bursting with opportunities to be lyrical, satirical, rhetorical, to unravel meanings, and to pose as many questions as it answers. It is a language of investigation and experimentation, it both constructs and shatters cultural expectations, and is constantly and rapidly transforming as forced by current social and political climates.
Theorien der Situation und künstlerische Praxis
Series:  dynamis
Dieses Buch geht der existentiellen und ästhetischen Bedeutung sowie dem erkenntnisgenerierenden Potential von Situationen nach.
Künstler arbeiten medienübergreifend mit Situationen, um Verkanntes oder Unerkanntes erfahrbar zu machen und derart „Wissen“ zu generieren. Sie entwickeln dabei medienspezifische Ästhetik-Konzepte, denen theoriegeleitet nachgegangen werden kann. Mit Rekurs auf interdisziplinäre Theorieansätze widmen sich die Beiträge künstlerischen Beispielen aus den Bereichen Musik, Theater über die bildende Kunst, Photographie, Film und Video bis zu einer veränderten Kommunikationssituation im Internet.
Visual Representation of Secrets in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700
Quid est secretum? Visual Representation of Secrets in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700 is the companion volume to Intersections 65.1, Quid est sacramentum? Visual Representation of Sacred Mysteries in Early Modern Europe, 1400-1700. Whereas the latter volume focused on sacramental mysteries, the current one examines a wider range of secret subjects. The book examines how secret knowledge was represented visually in ways that both revealed and concealed the true nature of that knowledge, giving and yet impeding access to it. In the early modern period, the discursive and symbolical sites for the representation of secrets were closely related to epistemic changes that transformed conceptions of the transmissibility of knowledge.
Jenseits von Mimesis und Repräsentation
Editor: Thierry Greub
Noch immer wird das Phänomen ›Porträt‹ im kunsthistorischen Diskurs zumeist unter Begrifflichkeiten wie Identität, Individualität, Repräsentation oder Ähnlichkeit diskutiert. Zeitgenössische amimetische, konzeptuelle und performative Porträtformen werden mit solchen Konzepten jedoch nicht mehr vollständig eingeholt. Der Band befragt deshalb einerseits kritisch diese traditionellen, mimetischen Begriffe anhand von Fallstudien. Andererseits werden ihnen dynamische und offene Konzepte (teils aus Nachbardisziplinen) wie Spur, Berührung, Fraktalität, Defazialisierung oder Dividualität an die Seite gestellt, um den kunsthistorischen Porträt-Begriff in einem fachübergreifenden Diskurs aufzufächern, der auch die Digitalisierung umfasst. ›Porträt‹ wird somit explizit als Konstruktion, self-fashioning und konzeptuelle Praxis des Performativen betrachtet.
This transdisciplinary project represents the most comprehensive study of imagination to date. The eclectic group of international scholars who comprise this volume propose bold and innovative theoretical frameworks for (re-) conceptualizing imagination in all of its divergent forms. Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory explores the complex nuances, paradoxes, and aporias related to the plethora of artistic mediums in which the human imagination manifests itself. As a fundamental attribute of our species, which other organisms also seem to possess with varying degrees of sophistication, imagination is the very fabric of what it means to be human into which everything is woven. This edited collection demonstrates that imagination is the resin that binds human civilization together for better or worse.
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Author: Wendy Wheeler

Abstract

This chapter introduces a biosemiotic view of imagination and its evolutionary understanding of nature and culture as consisting of semiotic relations through and through. It discusses the relation between self and environment (signifying umwelt) and the primary act of imagination as the building of a meaningful semiotic model of the environment in both humans and all other organisms. It identifies the self plus the umwelt as the basic evolutionary unit of survival and argues that this, not technologized, inflexible deterministic models must be the context in which imagination and evolution, which are structurally similar and constitute mind, can operate. Finally, it warns against imagination that takes its hand from the Earth into endless abstraction as a kind of hellish danger and looks at the dangers of attacks on meaning-making as forms of destructive semiocide.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Author: Jody Azzouni

Abstract

A phenomenological distinction is drawn between what is imaginable and what is conceivable (but not imaginable). This distinction is rooted, historically, in Descartes’ famous discussion of the piece of wax, and he describes as the difference between “imagination” and “intellection.” His example is described, but then the distinction is extended to a number of unexpected other kinds of cases. One is the experience of a native speaker of her own words. She can conceive of these words meaning differently than they do but she can’t imagine this. So too, those brought up with forks can’t imagine experiencing them as objects without a function; although an experience like that is conceivable. The final class of important examples is the conceivability of borders of objects being elsewhere than we experience them to be. One surprising result of the analysis of these examples in this paper is that what’s conceivable isn’t a guide to metaphysical possibility; it’s not even a guide to possible experience.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

Abstract

Realist accounts typically define solidarity on the basis of a static feature of human nature. We stand in solidarity with some other person, or group of people, because we share important features. However, those features are often used to further exclude groups that are already denied entry into the community of those who stand in solidarity with one another. In opposition to such realist accounts, Richard Rorty defines solidarity as a practical tool, within which there is always an “us,” with whom we stand in solidarity, and a “them,” with whom we are contrasted. I argue that by understanding Rorty’s pragmatic solidarity in terms of the relational view of solidarity offered by Alexis Shotwell, it is possible to conceptualize solidarity in a manner that allows for extending the boundaries of the community with whom we stand in solidarity. Furthermore, this pragmatic, relational version of solidarity provides normative force to the responsibility to extend those boundaries.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Author: Warren Heiti

Abstract

For Simone Weil, the imagination plays a fundamental role in knowing. In her early work, she describes perception as an interaction between mind and world. She borrows from Descartes the idea that the mind, in imagining, contemplates the image of a bodily thing. But the role of the imagination in her epistemology is ultimately Kantian: the imagination is what integrates active understanding and passive sensibility. What is unique to Weil’s account is its physical dimension. According to her, thinking is essentially activity, but the original action is a reaction of the body to an external stimulus. Such reactions generalize across similar stimuli, resulting in meta-images which are responsible for categorizing things and structuring perception. The imagination is Weil’s answer to the question, “Whence experience?” The raw wash of sensations is necessary, but not sufficient, to answer this question; and similarly with the structured emptiness of concepts. The imagination is what takes the signet ring of the conceptual realm and presses it into the melting wax of sensation—and thus produces experience.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

Abstract

What makes a thought, a poem, a musical idea, a feeling deep? This chapter demonstrates how light-hearted fun or festive frivolity and frolic insofar as it springs from the spirit of play, of non-competitive sport, can be “deep.” I begin with a wild act of imagination to support the analysis of “fun” that follows and, in the process, illuminates the very nature of imagination. This exercise stirs up our imagination both conceptually and culturally: conceptually by raising and displaying the imaginative fecundity of a “what-if” question, and culturally by challenging the stereotype that fun must be shallow. What if Socrates tried to analyze the 21st century concept of “fun?” Making a Socratic use of classical Indian aesthetics of humor and other modern Indian poetics of laughter, I explore the possibility of showing the profundity of the sense of lightness and fun of—even a predominantly painful—human life. Philosophy, thus, turns out to be itself an imaginative activity, namely, an art of combining depth and frivolity through an intercultural dialectical phenomenology of fun.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Author: Jiri Benovsky

Abstract

Imagination plays an important role in depiction. In this chapter, I focus on photography and I discuss the role imagination plays in photographic depiction. I suggest to follow a broadly Waltonian view, but I also depart from it in several places. I start by discussing a general feature of the relation of depiction, namely the fact that it is a ternary relation which always involves “something external.” I then turn my attention to Walton’s view, where this third relatum of the relation of depiction is largely analyzed in terms of the role imagination plays in depiction. I consider the objection to his view that not all cases of depiction involve imagination – for instance, documentary photographs – as well as Walton’s own strategy to face this objection, and I argue that it is partly adequate and partly wrong. As we will see, first, it is an unnecessary mistake to insist too heavily on the fact that photographs are produced in a mechanical way (as opposed to, say, paintings), and second, the notion of “imagining-seeing,” as it is articulated by Walton, is perhaps too strong and does not entirely do justice to the external character of the role imagination plays here.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

Abstract

This chapter examines the use of the surrealist technique of automatic writing by Shahrnush Parsipur as a radical imagination that weaves aesthetic experimentation, Iranian women’s right issues, and resistance to the patriarchal state ideology together in the novella Women Without Men. Automatic writing, which seeks to make a direct connection between latent thought and manifest thinking by bypassing repression, provides Parsipur the perfect medium for: (a) articulating the fluid thematic design of her novella, wherein women’s bodies morph into unnatural and supernatural forms, and, (b) criticizing both western and state ideologies that perceive and situate Iranian women as a silent minority. She reconstitutes the traditional surrealist representations of women as disembodied entities (André Breton), presenting them as subversive, radical, and avant-garde agents of change instead, much like the French Surrealist artist, photographer, and writer Claude Cahun. It also examines the theoretical lenses of ecofeminism, necroresistance, and psychoanalysis, to conclude that Parsipur’s writing techniques move in multiple directions and are always connected to many lines of thinking, acting, imagining, and being.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

Abstract

Geometry seems to depend on the formation and manipulation of figures in the imagination. This dependence could be investigated as a problem of empirical psychology, art history, or even pure mathematics. But my questions are philosophical: what is the imagination, and how could it help explain our geometrical knowledge? In this chapter, I study the problem of geometrical cognition as it emerges within a tradition, outlining how Aristotle, Proclus, and Kant understand imagination to be necessary for geometrical cognition. I also discuss two challenges for such theories: the rise of non-Euclidean geometry, and the reduction of mathematics to logic. In light of these challenges, I consider whether a philosophically elaborated conception of imagination might still be explanatory of geometrical knowledge.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory
Author: Allen Speight

Abstract

This chapter explores the relationship between historical imagination and judgment in the work of Hannah Arendt with an extended commentary on the two epigraphs Arendt chose for her intended work on Judging: the first from the portrayal of the Roman Cato by the poet Lucan and the second from the end of Goethe’s Faust. The essay gives an account of the shift Arendt’s account of judging undergoes from an activity undertaken by agents within the political world to one in which poets and storytellers are prominent and then delineates three aspects of her mature account of judgment and imagination that deserve attention: the solitariness of judging, its connection to the reciprocal relation between action and suffering and the demand for narrative integrity it requires. As will be argued, Arendt’s use of literary works to frame the problem of historical judgment is a key piece of evidence for her claim that it is the imagination above all—and particularly the work of poets and storytellers—that holds the important key for coming to terms with the problems inherent in judging the actions of historical figures.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory

Abstract

Sarban’s The Sound of his Horn (TSoHH) is a counterfactual historical fiction (cfhf) that explores the premise: what if Hitler had won World War ii? cfhf is a genre that comprises worlds whose histories run contrary to the actual world. The text presents two worlds – the world that the protagonist Alan originates in, set between 1941 and 1946 and a counterfactual dystopian world that Alan travels to, set 102 years after Hitler wins the war. The text also presents Alan as a potential unreliable narrator, thereby making readers question the plausibility of the counterfactual world throughout. In this chapter, I demonstrate the analytical potential of Possible Worlds Theory on cfhf texts such as TSoHH that present complex ontologies by theorizing how readers process multiple worlds with seemingly different ontological statuses.

In: Imagination and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory