Series:

Hyunjin Kim

Korean divorce law still adheres to fault-based divorce. According to a majority of the Supreme Court, the main reason for not admitting a no-fault policy is that the preconditions for systems for financially protecting the spouse and children after divorce have not yet been satisfied in Korea. However, there is not much time left, so we must use this golden time for preparing protective measures for divorced women and their children, through legislative efforts. Re-conceptualizing pension entitlements as the object of property division through Court rulings and legislation deserves to be highly evaluated. It is also noteworthy that a belated but wise establishment of the state agency to enforce child support obligations and its soft landing may be seen.

Jong-Hyun Yi

History of Korean Modern Retailing

Repressed Consumption and Retail Industry, Perceived Equality and Economic Growth

Jong-Hyun Yi

In History of Korean Modern Retailing Jong-Hyun Yi shows how the Korean retail industry has developed since the 1970s, focusing on the relationship among government, consumers and retail companies, especially the department store. While generally it is said that underdevelopment of the Korean retail industry in the 1970s was attributed to economic immaturity, he argues it was artificially formed by strong consumption repression by the government. He also examines how consumption repression contributed to economic growth. Such initial condition in developmental period is a crucial factor to explain other distinctions like explosive growth and remarkably short heyday of the department store afterward.

With this, Jong-Hyun Yi traces the correlation between economic growth and stratification of the consumption since the 1970s. He proves that equality or inequality of consumption is a more influential factor for economic growth than that of income.

Jong-Hyun Yi

Jong-Hyun Yi

Jong-Hyun Yi

Series:

Kenneth M. Wells

This outline of Korea’s civilisation is a cultural history that examines the ways the Korean people over the past two millennia understood the world and viewed their place in society. In the traditional era, the interaction between several broad religious and philosophical traditions and social institutions, state interests and, at times, external pressures, provides the framework of the story. In the modern era, the chief concern is with the rapid and momentous cultural changes that have occurred over the past one and a half centuries in the idea and spread of education, the rise in influence of students, the development of mass culture, the redefinition of gender, and the continuing importance of religion.

Series:

Kenneth M. Wells

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia

Western and Eastern Constructions

Series:

Edited by Rotem Kowner and Walter Demel

Race and Racism in Modern East Asia juxtaposes Western racial constructions of East Asians with constructions of race and their outcomes in modern East Asia. It is the first endeavor to explicitly and coherently link constructions of race and racism in both regions. These constructions have not only played a decisive role in shaping the relations between the West and East Asia since the mid nineteenth century, but also exert substantial influence on current relations and mutual images in both the East-West nexus and East Asia. Written by some of the field's leading authorities, this groundbreaking 21-chapter volume offers an analysis of these constructions, their evolution and their interrelations.

Series:

Edited by Donald Baker

Until the last quarter of the eighteenth century, there were no Christians in Korea. Today Korea is one of the most Christian countries in Asia, with over 30% of South Koreans claiming Christianity as their religious affiliation. The articles in these volumes trace the history of Christianity in Korea from its eighteenth-century beginnings to the present day. These articles address differences in how Catholicism and Protestantism were received, as well as the changing relationship of Christianity to political power, and the impact of Christianity on gender roles. They also examine how Christianity has interacted with the other religious institutions in Korea, and how Christianity has become Koreanized. They present the most sophisticated and the most recent research on the remarkable transformation of the religious culture of Korea over the last two and a half centuries.

Korea’s Ancient Koguryŏ Kingdom

A Socio-Political History

Taedon Noh

Originating from a series of papers written by Prof. Noh Tae-don over two decades of research, Korea’s Ancient Koguryŏ Kingdom: A Socio-Political History concentrates on the political and social aspects of what was the largest of the Proto-Korean nation-states (37 BCE to 668 CE) that finally succumbed to subversion and invasion thirteen centuries ago. Its legendary origins are dealt with from the standpoint of their long-term political implications, as are its social institutions such as levirate marriage.

Explored in detail are the convoluted diplomatic, military, and commercial relations with various Chinese dynasties as well as Japan, and the shifting powers in Manchuria, Mongolia, and Central Asia. In addition, perhaps for the first time anywhere, the Koguryŏ national and provincial administrative structures are described as they evolved over the seven centuries of the nation’s existence. Exhaustive documentation is provided throughout.

As a landmark study of the Koguryŏ kingdom, this work will be of considerable value to students of Northeast Asian history in general and of Korean history in particular.

Everyday Life in Joseon-Era Korea

Economy and Society

The Organization of Korean Historians

Edited by Michael D. Shin

Winner of the 2014 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award

Everyday Life in Joseon-Era Korea shows how the momentous changes of the time transformed the lives of the common people. In twenty-three concise chapters, the book covers topics ranging from agriculture, commerce, and mining to education, marriage, and food culture. It examines how both the spread of Neo-Confucianism in the early Joseon period and its decline from the seventeenth century impacted economic and social life.

The book also demonstrates that much of what is thought of as ancient Korean tradition actually developed in the Joseon period. Chapters in this book discuss how customs such as ancestor worship, the use of genealogies, and foods such as kimchi all originated or became widespread in this era.

Contributors: Kim Kuentae, Yeom Jeong Sup, Kim Sung Woo, Lee Hun-Chang, Lee Uk, Yoo Pil Jo, Kim Kyung-ran, Kim Eui-Hwan, Oh Soo-chang, Ko Dong-Hwan, Kwon Nae-Hyun, Lee Hae Jun, Jung Jin Young, Kwon Ki-jung, Han Sang Kwon, Kwon Soon-Hyung, Jang Dong-Pyo, Seo-Tae-Won, Sim Jae-woo, Chung Yeon-sik, O Jong-rok, Hong Soon Min. This volume was co-translated by Edward Park and Michael D. Shin.

Michael D. Shin and Edward Park

Michael D. Shin and Edward Park

Edited by Andrew David Jackson

Key Papers on Korea is a commemorative collection of papers celebrating 25 years of the Centre of Korean Studies (CKS), SOAS, University of London that have been written by senior academics and emerging scholars. The subjects covered in this collection reflect the different research interests and different strengths of the CKS and include historical perceptions of ancient kingdoms in Manchuria, North Korean propaganda literature, the problematic history of Sino-North Korean borderlands, the millenarian aspects of Won Buddhism, and the importance of the years 1910-11 in the development of Korean music. The collection is framed by two pieces on SOAS, which have been commissioned exclusively for this publication: an introduction that examines the 60-year history of Korean studies at SOAS, and a closing paper that sheds light on the rare collections of Korean art held at SOAS.

Ki-jung Kwon

Yeon-sik Chung

Dong-Pyo Jang

Michael D. Shin and Edward Park

Noh Taedon

Michael D. Shin and Edward Park

Noh Taedon

Yeon-sik Chung

Tae-Won Seo

Noh Taedon

Jae-woo Sim

Michael D. Shin and Edward Park

Eui-Hwan Kim

Soo-chang Oh

Jong-rok O