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In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
In: Das theologische Profil des Julian von Toledo
This volume offers a comprehensive account of a Manichaean community in fourth-century Roman Egypt. The study analyses papyrological material from Kellis, a village in Egypt’s Dakhleh Oasis, and their implications for Manichaeism as a socio-religious movement.

Drawing on social network theory and engaging with current trends in the study of lived ancient religion, Teigen explores how lay families at Kellis cohered as a religious community. Whereas recent scholarship has seen the laity here as largely detached from distinctively Manichaean traditions, he argues that the papyri in fac reveal a community immersed in Manichaean ideas and practices. The book thereby shows how new religious identities were deeply entangled in everyday social life in late antiquity.
An Ancient Invitation to Ecclesial Hermeneutics
In Tyconius’ Book of Rules Matthew R. Lynskey explores the church-centric interpretation of ancient biblical exegete Tyconius in his hermeneutical treatise Liber regularum. Influential within his Donatist tradition and the broader context of early North African Christianity, Tyconius wrote one of the earliest works on exegetical theory and praxis in Latin Christianity.
By investigating five key concepts undergirding Tyconius’s theology of church, Lynskey demonstrates how Tyconius’ ecclesiology shaped his hermeneutical enterprise. Through careful readings and close analysis of Liber regularum, this study seeks to describe Tyconius’ exegesis on its own terms, reflecting on notable historical, theological, formational, and missiological implications of his ecclesial exegesis as it concerns the ancient and contemporary church.