In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In: Studien zur griechischen Syntax dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit
In a novel study of the impact of classical culture, John McManamon demonstrates that Renaissance scholars rediscovered the importance of swimming to the ancient Greeks and Romans and conceptualized the teaching of swimming as an art.
The ancients had a proverb that described a truly ignorant person as knowing “neither letters nor swimming.” McManamon traces the ancient textual and iconographic evidence for an art of swimming, demonstrates its importance in warfare, and highlights the activities of free-divers who exploited the skill of swimming to earn a living. Renaissance theorists of a humanist education first advocated a rebirth for swim training, Erasmus included the classical proverb in his Adages, and two sixteenth-century scholars wrote treatises in dialogue form on methods for teaching young people how to swim.
The history of European integration goes back to the early modern centuries (c. 1400–1800), when Europeans tried to set themselves apart as a continental community with distinct political, religious, cultural, and social values in the face of hitherto unseen societal change and global awakening. The range of concepts and images ascribed to Europeanness in that respect is well documented in Neo-Latin literature, since Latin constituted the international lingua franca from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. In Europe and Europeanness in Early Modern Latin Literature Isabella Walser-Bürgler examines the most prominent concepts of Europe and European identity as expressed in Neo-Latin sources. It is aimed at both an interested general audience and a professional readership from the fields of Latin studies, early modern history, and the history of ideas.
In: Mnemosyne
Author: Jaap Mansfeld

Abstract

The question (once again) is in what cognitively acceptable way the Alētheia and Doxa sections of the epic should be connected, that is to say in what way Parmenides himself may have envisaged the relation between ontological Truth and mistaken human Opinions. An important distinction is found to obtain between the common run of humankind, ignorant and helpless, and an enlightened human elite. The views of this elite serve as an intermediate between the cognitive condition of humanity in general and the arcane knowledge and ontology of the Alētheia section and help to attenuate the dualism by bridging the gap between ignorance and absolute Truth. There is a significant and crucial interplay between the two sections which works both ways, forward from the Alētheia to the Doxa section and backwards from the Doxa to the Alētheia section. Defining characteristics of the elements per se and of their compounds in the Doxa section are reflections of defining properties of Being in the Alētheia section. Conversely, recognition of these elemental characteristics may point the way back to properties of Being. The argument of the epic from fr. B1 to fr. B19 DK is strictly organized by means of reiterated theses and type-scenes, which lend an overarching unity to the poem. This technique itself is not new, but the contents of these reiterated motifs (such as the mention of humans, of the distinction between Being and not-Being, of name-giving, or of defining properties and characteristics) are original. The reiterated motifs which secure the proofs of the main thesis function as hidden persuaders. The story of the extraordinary journey of the anonymous author to the dwelling of his nameless goddess and the revelation he receives from her have been carefully authenticated and stage-managed to provide divine backing for the stunning doctrines put forward and are also aimed at convincing the audience.

In: Mnemosyne

Abstract

This article considers the Lucianic Erôtes a receptor of Greek novels and focusses on Chariton’s Callirhoe as hypotext. It argues that Chariton’s construction of Callirhoe as a double of Aphrodite, and the plot that this predicament generates, are central to the presentation of the statue of Aphrodite in the Erôtes. This is revealed by consistent verbal echoes and by the re-enactment of memorable scenes in the novel. The Erôtes emerges as an important document for the early reception of Greek novels, and its author as an attentive reader of them.

In: Mnemosyne
Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online, Collection 2021 is the electronic version of the book publication program of Brill in the field of Classical Studies in 2021.

Coverage:
Ancient Philosophy, Ancient History, Ancient Religion, Greek and Roman Literature, Epigraphy & Papyrology, Archeology

This E-Book Collection is part of Brill's Classical Studies E-Books Online Collection.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.

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This volume places the satirical works of the Middle Byzantine period in a wider political and socio-cultural context, exploring not only their various forms but also their functions and meanings. The volume is divided into four parts. The first part provides the backgrounds of the authors and texts discussed in the volume. The second concerns the manifold functions and appearances of Byzantine satirical texts. Part three offers detailed analyses of three largely unexplored texts (the Charidemos, the Philopatris, and the Anacharsis). The last section moves from the individual texts to the larger picture of satirical modes in Middle Byzantium.

Contributors are Baukje van den Berg, Floris Bernard, Stavroula Constantinou, Eric Cullhed, Janek Kucharski, Markéta Kulhánková, Paul Magdalino, Henry Maguire, Przemysław Marciniak, Charis Messis, Ingela Nilsson, Emilie van Opstall, Panagiotis Roilos, and Nikos Zagklas.
Eine Untersuchung der griechischen Alltagssprache, die anhand der dokumentarischen Papyri der römischen Zeit aus Ägypten (1. – 4. Jh. n. Chr.) einen Beitrag zum Verständnis der Sprache der nachklassischen Zeit und ihrer Entwicklung leistet.
Die dokumentarischen Papyri aus Ägypten dokumentieren die dortige griechische Alltagssprache in unmittelbarem, nicht durch spätere Überlieferungsprozesse vereinheitlichtem Zustand. So bezeugen sie damals gängige Sprachformen und ihre sprachgeschichtlichen Kontexte.
In diesem Band werden syntaktische Phänomene des Griechischen anhand von Textstellen aus solchen Papyri erläutert und mit vorherigen Sprachstufen sowie mit anderen Arten von Zeugnissen verglichen. Die Arbeit ergänzt die grundlegende, aber unabgeschlossen gebliebene Grammatik zur Sprache dokumentarischer Papyri der römischen Zeit von F. Gignac (1976/1981) mit der Behandlung ausgewählter syntaktischer Phänomene und behandelt einige der bedeutendsten Veränderungen des Griechischen in der nachklassischen Zeit, die der heutigen griechischen Sprache zugrunde liegen.
In: Mnemosyne
Brill Research Perspectives in Classical Poetry (RPCPS) is a peer-reviewed book series presenting review articles with commentary on the current state of the field of Classical Poetry. Articles provide synthetic reviews of Classical Poetry that reflect the latest research in the field. They cover periods, genres and authors from Homer through Late Antiquity. Authors combine historical, formal, and theoretical analysis, and they present extensive bibliographies of relevant scholarship. In containing both broad overviews of subject areas and detailed advanced criticism, articles are designed to be useful to scholars, teachers, and students alike.
EUHORMOS is an international book series intended for monographs and collective volumes on classical antiquity. Specifically, it welcomes manuscripts related to the concept of ‘anchoring innovation’ by classical scholars of all disciplines from all over the world. All books will be published in Open Access (online) as well as in print.
The series publishes book-length studies (single-authored or edited) of ancient innovations and their societal perceptions and valuations, in particular in connection with their ‘anchoring’, the various ways in which ‘the new’ could (or could not) be connected to what was already familiar. ‘The new’ is not restricted to the technical or scientific domains, but can include the ‘new information’ imparted by speakers through linguistic means, literary innovation, political, social, cultural or economic innovation, and new developments in material culture.

EUHORMOS is one of the results of the Dutch so-called Gravitation Grant (2017), awarded to a consortium of scholars from OIKOS, the National Research School in Classical Studies. See https://www.ru.nl/oikos/anchoring-innovation.

EUHORMOS is the Homeric term for a harbour ‘in which the anchoring is good’. Under this auspicious title, we aim to publish a book series striving to afford ‘good anchorage’ to studies contributing to a better understanding of ‘anchoring innovation’ in Greco-Roman Antiquity.

For sending your proposal or submitting manuscripts for the series, please contact Brill’s Assistant Editor for Classical Studies, Giulia Moriconi.