In this book Elizabeth Walgenbach argues that outlawry in medieval Iceland was a punishment shaped by the conventions of excommunication as it developed in the medieval Church. Excommunication and outlawry resemble one another, often closely, in a range of Icelandic texts, including lawcodes and narrative sources such as the contemporary sagas. This is not a chance resemblance but a by-product of the way the law was formed and written. Canon law helped to shape the outlines of secular justice.
The book is organized into chapters on excommunication, outlawry, outlawry as secular excommunication, and two case studies—one focused on the conflicts surrounding Bishop Guðmundr Arason and another focused on the outlaw Aron Hjǫrleifsson.
Author: Jakub Wysmułek
This volume offers the first comprehensive analysis of wills in late medieval Krakow. It presents the origins of testamentary acts in the Kingdom of Poland and its centre, Krakow, and their subsequent transformation from so called ‘canonical wills’ to ‘communal wills’. Wysmułek discusses the socio-cultural role of wills and sets them in their contemporary legal, social, and economic context. In doing so, he uncovers their influence on property ownership and family relations in the city, as well as on the religious practices of the burghers. Ultimately, this work seeks to change the perception of wills by treating the testamentary act itself as an important agent of historical social change – a ‘tool of power’.
Author: Dante Fedele
Dante Fedele’s new work of reference reveals the medieval foundations of international law through a comprehensive study of a key figure of late medieval legal scholarship: Baldus de Ubaldis (1327-1400). A student of Bartolus de Sassoferrato, Baldus wrote both extensive commentaries on Roman, canon and feudal law and thousands of consilia originating from particular cases. His writings dealt with numerous issues related to sovereignty, territorial jurisdiction, diplomacy and war, combining a rich conspectus of earlier scholarship with highly creative ideas that exercised a profound influence on later juristic thought. The detailed picture of the international law doctrines elaborated by a prominent medieval jurist offered in this study contributes to our understanding of the intellectual archaeology of international law.
Latin and German Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck
This is the companion volume to the author's “An Unusual Inquisition”: Translated Documents from Heinricus Institoris’s Witch Hunts in Ravensburg and Innsbruck (Brill, 2020), and contains a full edition of the Latin and German documents illustrating Heinricus Institoris's activities as prosecutor of witchcraft in Ravensburg in 1484 and Innsbruck in 1485. These events had a great influence on Institoris's composition of the Malleus Maleficarum, the most famous and influential early-modern textbook on witchcraft. This is the only full and complete edition of these documents, some of which have not previously been published in their entirety, and the texts greatly illuminate the historical setting of the composition of one of history's most notorious books.
Author: Maciej Mikuła
In this volume, Maciej Mikuła analyses the extant texts of the Ius municipale Magdeburgense, the most important collection of Magdeburg Law in late medieval Poland. He discusses the different translation traditions of the collection; the application of Magdeburg Law in cities; how differences between the versions could affect the application of the rights; and how the invention of printing influenced the principle of legal certainty. Mikuła ultimately shows that the differences between the texts not only influenced legal practice, but also bear out how complex the process was of the adaptation of Magdeburg Law.
This volume explores familial wealth arrangements and gendered property from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries Italian, German and Austrian territories (including Florence, Trento, Tyrol, and Vienna), Nordic countries, Western Pyrenees, and England. Family property as capital in the form of houses, land, movables, financial assets, and rights were of great importance in the past. Arrangements of such property were characterised by a high degree of negotiating competence but likewise they entailed competition between the parties involved and were highly conflict prone. Fourteen contributors from Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, and the UK address different marital property regimes in relation to the practices and legal regulations of inheritance patterns with consideration to inter-familial negotiation, conflict, and resolution.

Contributors are: Marie-Pierre Arrizabalaga, Laura Casella, Isabelle Chabot, Siglinde Clementi, Simona Feci, Ellinor Forster, Andrea Griesebner, Christian Hagen, Margareth Lanzinger, Janine Maegraith, Silvia Mattivi, Beatrice Moring, Craig Muldrew, Regina Schäfer, and Georg Tschannett.
Naturrecht, Moralphilosophie und Eigentumstheorie in Kants "Naturrecht Feyerabend"
In recent decades, Kant's philosophy of law has increasingly moved into the focus of moral-philosophical discussions. In this context, the "Naturrecht Feyerabend" is of particular importance. On the one hand, it is the only surviving transcription of the lectures on natural law that Kant gave twelve times between 1767 and 1788; on the other hand, it is based on his lectures in the summer semester of 1784 and thus provides important evidence of Kant's reflections during an important phase in the development of his moral philosophy. Despite this special significance, the text has received little attention in previous research. Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner and Gianluca Sadun Bordoni present here a volume that emphasizes this special significance. The ten contributions in the volume ask about the relationship of "Naturrecht Feyerabend" to the tradition of natural law as well as its relationship to critical moral philosophy and the late "Doctrine of Right".

Contributors are: Manfred Baum, Franz Hespe, Philipp-Alexander Hirsch, Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner, Markus Kohl, Gabriel Rivero, Gianluca Sadun Bordoni, Michael Städtler, and Gideon Stiening.

Kants Rechtsphilosophie ist in den letzten Jahrzehnten wieder zunehmend in das Zentrum moralphilosophischer Diskussionen gerückt. Dabei kommt dem sogenannten „Naturrecht Feyerabend“ eine besondere Bedeutung zu. Denn einerseits stellt diese Nachschrift die einzige erhaltene Transkription der Vorlesungen über Naturrecht dar, die Kant zwischen 1767 und 1788 immerhin zwölfmal hielt; zudem geht sie andererseits auf seine Vorlesungen aus dem Sommersemester 1784 zurück und ist damit ein wichtiges Zeugnis der Überlegungen Kants aus einer besonders wichtigen Phase in der Entwicklung seiner Moralphilosophie. Trotz dieser besonderen Bedeutung wurde dem Text in der bisherigen Forschung wenig Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt. Dieter Hüning, Stefan Klingner und Gianluca Sadun Bordoni legen hier einen Band vor, der die besondere Bedeutung des „Naturrechts Feyerabend“ herausstellt. Die zehn Beiträge des Bandes fragen dabei nach dem Verhältnis des „Naturrechts Feyerabend“ zur Naturrechtstradition sowie nach dessen Verhältnis zur kritischen Moralphilosophie und zur späten „Rechtslehre“.
Volume Editor: Thom Gobbitt