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Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation
In Learning the Language of Scripture, Mark Randall James offers a new account of theological interpretation as a sapiential practice of learning the language of Scripture, drawing on recently discovered Homilies on the Psalms by the influential early theologian Origen of Alexandria (2nd-3rd c. C.E). Widely regarded as one of the most arbitrary interpreters, James shows that Origen’s appearance of arbitrariness is a result of the modern tendency to neglect the role of wisdom in scriptural interpretation. James demonstrates that Origen offers a compelling model of a Christian pragmatism in which learning and correcting linguistic practice is a site of the transformative pedagogy of the divine Logos.
Richard Kilvington was one of the most talented Oxford Calculators. His influence on late medieval philosophy and theology remains unquestionable. He made a name for himself with his logical treatise Sophismata, which was soon followed by a series of three commentaries on Aristotle’s works and a commentary on Peter Lombard’s Sentences. Richard Kilvington on the Capacity of Created Being, Infinity, and Being Simultaneously in Rome and Paris by Monika Michałowska presents a critical edition of question 3 from Kilvington’s Quaestiones super libros Sententiarum, complete with an introduction to the edition and a guide to Kilvington’s theological concepts. Kilvington’s theological question commentary enjoyed considerable popularity and became a source of continuous inspiration for Oxonian and Parisian masters.
Die Beiträge des Bandes verstehen „Krise“ als einen zentralen Bestandteil kultureller und gesellschaftlicher Institutionen – und gleichermaßen als Ursprung und Effekt von Erzählungen: Einerseits müssen Krisenphänomene narrativ hergestellt, medien-, gattungs- und disziplinspezifisch in Szene gesetzt werden, andererseits dient die Kulturtechnik des Erzählens – nicht nur im engeren Sinne einer talking cure – der Überwindung von und dem Lernen aus Krisen. Dabei stellen Krisen in Erzählprozessen als Ereignis meist den Zeitpunkt unmittelbar vor einem Wendepunkt dar: Krisen erfordern Entscheidungen.
Ausgangspunkt des Bands Ästhetik und Politik der Zerstreuung ist die Annahme, dass die produktive Instanz von Kultur ein anonymer Prozess diskursiver Zerstreuung und Zerstreutheit ist, dem als entgegengesetzte Operationen Formen von Sammlung und Konzentration entgegenwirken. Während letztere die Funktionen der Hierarchisierung, Totalisierung und Identifi zierung übernehmen, also Ordnung stiften in Bereichen, die eigentlich vom Prinzip der Dispersion gekennzeichnet sind, interessieren sich die Beiträge des vorliegenden Bands für ebenjene Momente kultureller Produktion, in denen das Prinzip der Zerstreuung entfesselt wird, Schlupflöcher findet, Grenzen überwindet und Fluchtlinien eröffnet. Angeregt von Überlegungen der Dortmunder Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaftlerin Ute Gerhard widmen sie sich in exemplarischen Studien den Praktiken, Räumen, Diskursen und Subjektivitäten der Zerstreuung. Auf diese Weise tragen sie dazu bei, ihre spezifische Ästhetik und Politik genauer zu konturieren.
In Enthymemes and Topoi in Dialogue, Ellen Breitholtz presents a novel and precise account of reasoning from an interactional perspective. The account draws on the concepts of enthymemes and topoi, originating in Aristotelian rhetoric and dialectic, and integrates these in a formal dialogue semantic account using TTR, a type theory with records.
Argumentation analysis and formal approaches to reasoning often focus the logical validity of arguments on inferences made in discourse from a god’s-eye perspective. In contrast, Breitholtz’s account emphasises the individual perspectives of interlocutors and the function and acceptability of their reasoning in context. This provides an analysis of interactions where interlocutors have access to different topoi and therefore make different inferences.
These lectures deal with the role of cognitive modelling in language-based meaning construction. To make meaning people use a small set of principles which they apply to different types of conceptual characterizations. This yields predictable meaning effects, which, when stably associated with specific grammatical patterns, result in constructions or fixed form-meaning parings. This means that constructional meaning can be described on the basis of the same principles that people use to make inferences. This way of looking at pragmatics and grammar through cognition allows us to relate a broad range of pragmatic and grammatical phenomena, among them argument-structure characterizations, implicational, illocutionary, and discourse structure, and such figures of speech as metaphor, metonymy, hyperbole, and irony.

Abstract

It is shown that the lemma Old High German skruba that is generally found in the dictionaries is a mistake for skuoba and that its meaning is not ‘scrubber’ but rather ‘leather (skin)’ or perhaps ‘scraper’.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Evie Coussé

Abstract

This article presents a corpus study of complex verb constructions in Old Dutch. A systematic search of the Old Dutch Corpus uncovers a set of fifteen complex verb constructions which all stack two auxiliaries (one finite and one nonfinite) on top of a main verb. The oldest and most frequent complex verb construction in the corpus is a future passive construction combining finite sullan ‘shall’ with nonfinite werthan ‘be’ and a past participle. The article discusses all fifteen complex verb constructions in detail and sketches the wider linguistic context in which they are found.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Guus Kroonen

Abstract

This short etymological note presents the North Germanic cognates of the ichthyonym houting ‘Coregonus oxyrinchus’, which in the Dutch etymological literature on the word have remained unnoticed. It is argued on the basis of Danish helt and related forms that the Proto-(Northwest-)Germanic reconstruction of this word can be set to *halti-.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Bernard Mees

Abstract

Difficult etymologies in Germanic include that of *hanha- ‘horse’ and *hanhistaz / *hangistaz ‘stallion’. Reflections of the latter term are widely evidenced in the Old Germanic dialects while the former is attested onomastically on a late-fourth-century memorial from Burgundy and has also been claimed to be reflected in early runic epigraphy. Both terms appear to continue a remorphologised s-stem *hanhaz ~ *hangisō and have clear Celtic counterparts. The development in Germanic seems to reflect the prehistoric date of the loaning of the s-stem *hanhaz ~ *hangisō from Celtic.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik
Author: Valentina Concu

Abstract

The emergence of the German double present and past perfect (hat vergessen gehabt ‘has forgotten had’; ist gefahren gewesen ‘is gone been’ – hatte vergessen gehabt ‘had forgotten had’; war gefahren gewesen ‘was gone been’) is still widely debated. Some scholars consider the development of these constructions a result of the decline of the Präteritum, whereas others claim that these were formed as a consequence of the loss of the aspectual system and the reconstruction process of the verbal categories. In this article, the author argues that the development of these constructions is the result of the grammaticalization of the Perfekt as a ‘commentary tense’ in the 14th Century. The increased frequency of the present perfect prompted the reanalysis of the past participles of haben (gehabt) and sein (gewesen), which began to appear alongside the present perfect, creating new periphrastic constructions, including the double present and past perfects.

In: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik