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The Evolution of the Israeli Third Sector reviews the development of the nonprofit sector in Israel and analyzes it within existing nonprofit theories. It takes a historical perspective in looking at its evolution, in light of political, social, ideological, and economic changes in the world and in the country. It discusses the development of policy and government involvement on the one hand and the unique features of Israeli philanthropy, both Jewish and Arab, on the other. It analyzes Israel’s civil society and social movements as well as social entrepreneurship and their expression in the Third Sector. The book also covers the development of research and education on the Third Sector; it includes a review of research centers, databases, journals, and specific programs that were developed by Israeli universities.
Author: Mary Jay

The decolonization of African studies extends beyond content to ethical partnerships between the North and the African continent. One key component of realizing partnership is through publishing. African studies research published by Northern publishers is not often even minimally available in Africa; and this is despite scholars on the continent often being partners or facilitators in research undertaken by Northern scholars. Northern publishers have perceived no commercial gain, given small African markets, lack of purchasing power, and lack of distribution systems. Conversely, African publishers have efficient distribution into the North through African Books Collective, owned and governed by them. But in suitable rare cases the African publisher can broker co-publications with Northern publishers who want the originating rights. In the light of these issues, African Books Collective launched an initiative to seek to break the deadlock. In partnership with the International African Institute, and with the active support of the African Studies Associations of the UK and the US, work is proceeding with publishers in the North and the South to broker co-publishing or co-editions to address this historic marginalization of Africa.

In: Logos

Following Peter Elbow’s work on ‘resonant voice’ or ‘presence’, this essay examines the seldom-explored resonance between a text and its writer in the moment of its creation. The essay asks what the boundaries and content of this space might look like, and how this knowledge might positively affect the creative product. It challenges the popular search for a writer’s ‘voice’, instead positing that each writer has a perpetually shifting internal plurality of voices, which unifies the constructivist and social constructionist views of the self. By arguing that the resonance between writer and writing is the experience of this plurality coming to harmony, the essay posits that to create such a resonance involves a balance of simultaneously relinquishing control to the internal choir and learning how to better conduct it.

In: Logos
In: Logos

‘My Africa Reads’ is a memoir that looks back at my reading history. The ‘Preamble’ identifies authors who influenced my worldview during my secondary and tertiary education in the UK and who remained my companions during the first decade of my return to Nigeria. From this immersion in Eurocentric literature, the memoir progresses to my encounter with postcolonial African literature in the collective setting of the Africa Book Group (ABG), which I joined in 2002 and led from 2014 to 2018. The memoir looks at authors and literature that the international women of ABG have engaged with, and at meetings at which guest experts spoke on aspects of African studies and affairs. It highlights the power of ABG—a shared reading experience—to advance that part of my cultural liberation facilitated by good postcolonial literature and open, unconstrained discussions with other women.

In: Logos
Author: Daniel Bunyard

Publishing is often characterized by instinctive decision-making with little attempt to apply a scientific methodology to an obvious question: why does one book sell and another not? The thesis of this paper is that, although there are aspects of a book’s publication history that one cannot predict in advance, one can know what these aspects are. A simple syllogism underlies the argument: if human behaviour can be understood through psychology and if book-buying is a form of behaviour, the motivations for book-buying can also be understood through psychology. This approach can be applied historically, through recourse to sales data, to trace the fossils of books published long ago and so discover the type and strength of the motivations that once drove people to buy them. History demonstrates that these motivations, once properly framed, can be understood to be influenced by context. Book-buying motivations also appear cyclically. This leads to a discussion of why it is that one book rather than another may satisfy a motivation and therefore sell better than another. Using the concept of prisms combining to reflect a motivational ‘light’, we see that books exist as constructs of a finite range of elements that cohere (or not) in a multiplicative way to enhance or diminish their effectiveness. Evidence is also given for what appears to be a universal ratio that dictates a natural entropy in the effectiveness of these prismatic elements.

In: Logos
Academic Activism in the Neoliberal Era
Author: Philippe Peycam
This book is about cultural work in torn-up societies. It narrates the establishment of an academic project in contemporary post-war Cambodia, when the country became the largest recipient of international aid. It depicts a Southeast Asian country at the crossroads of conflicting imaginaries of development through the lens of an independent organization that emerged out of the turmoil. It shows how the relations of domination of institutions from the ‘north’ effectively constrain alternative visions of action in the ‘south’ that fall outside the neo-liberal framework.

The account is a reflection on past ambitions and failures of the international good-will order, and a charge to change our approach in the future. It offers a cautionary tale whose significance transcends the Cambodian case.
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
In: Cultural Renewal in Cambodia
The evolving societal, political and economic landscape has led to increased demands on higher education institutions to make their contribution and benefits to society more visible, and in many cases with fewer public resources. This book contributes to the understanding of the responsibilities of Higher Education and the challenges posed to the production and circulation of knowledge. It raises questions about the role of higher education in society, its responsibility towards students and staff, and regarding its intended impact. The book brings together a range of topical papers, and a diversity of perspectives: scientific investigations of reputed scholars, critical evidence-based papers of third space professionals, and policymakers’ perspectives on the daily practice and management of higher education institutions and systems. The variety of both content and contributors elevates the richness of the book and its relevance for a large audience.

Contributors are: Victor M. H. Borden, Lex Borghans, Bruno Broucker, Hamish Coates, Gwilym Croucher, Lisa Davidson, Mark Engberg, Philipp Friedrich, Martina Gaisch, Solomon Gebreyohans Gebru, Ton Kallenberg, Kathi A. Ketcheson, Lu Liu, Alfredo Marra, Clare Milsom, Kenneth Moore, Roberto Moscati, Marjolein Muskens, Daniela Nömeyer, Attila Pausits, Svetlana Shenderova, Wafa Singh, Chuanyi Wang, Denyse Webbstock, Gregory Wolniak, and Jiale Yang.
Author: Ton Kallenberg

Abstract

This exploratory study is part of a larger inquiry that investigates the roles and practices of academic leaders in Higher Education. This chapter explores the relationship between trust, strategic behavior of academic (middle) leaders, and their ambition to achieve personal, organizational or societal status within the organizational strategy. A key aspect in the functioning of academic (middle) leaders is the way they fulfill the role of broker: they ‘knit together’ organizational activities and mediate, negotiate and interpret connections between top and ground levels throughout the organization. In this way, they fulfill four strategic roles in a more or less intensive manner: championing, synthesizing, facilitating, implementing. In this chapter it is argued that relational and organizational based trust influences the strategic roles of academic (middle) leaders and their ambitions of strategic levels. Because academic leaders are in a pivotal position within a university, their behavior is an important factor in the difference between successful and unsuccessful strategies of universities.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

In their attempt to redefine the relationship between state and higher education institutions by the end of the century, national administrations in Europe underwent changes in their organizational format and governance approach toward the sector. This chapter presents parts of a doctoral thesis that examined closely the governance changes taking place in Austrian and Norwegian HE in the early 2000s. Central to the thesis were organizational transformations at the ministerial level and the creation of governmental agencies in the area of quality assurance and internationalization, using organizational autonomy and capacity as analytical dimensions. Based on statistical data, legal frameworks, policy documents, and expert interviews, the thesis shed light on how governments in higher education transformed against the backdrop of substantive governance reforms. The Austrian approach included capacity reductions at the ministerial level, and a cautious approach toward the empowerment of governmental agencies. The Norwegian approach involved stable capacity developments at the ministerial level, while similarly expanding autonomy and capacity of governmental agencies.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

This chapter presents an emerging concept within the context of higher education study abroad, intercultural wonderment. This concept is understood as students’ underlying curiosity to seek out novel experiences and their willingness and capacity to deal with discomfort while studying abroad. We review findings related to intercultural wonderment from earlier research efforts with which we have been involved. In particular, we discuss some of the applications and limitations of this earlier work. We present our current thinking about inquiry on intercultural wonderment as it relates to informing both educational practice and research related to study abroad. The chapter concludes by explaining research with which we are presently involved and implications for optimizing teaching, learning, assessment, and research in study abroad contexts.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

This chapter examines the actors involved, the purpose, orientation, types, mechanisms, consequences and challenges of external accountability in the Ethiopian public higher education. Data were generated from literature review, relevant government documents and interviews conducted with key informants at several federal institutions that have a stake in the accountability of public higher education institutions (HEIs). The analysis shows that there is a trend towards result-oriented accountability in the sector and Ethiopian public HEIs are accountable to multiple external stakeholders, particularly through political, administrative and academic types of accountability. The study also demonstrates that although the external system of accountability utilizes various types, mechanisms and consequences of accountability, it is characterized by a number of challenges. Several recommendations are forwarded to minimize the challenges and to enable Ethiopian public HEIs attain their mission.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

Finnish and Russian universities have developed internationalization activities including double degree programs (double degrees), taking advantage of such benefits as their common border, membership of the Bologna Process and support from the governments of both countries. This chapter discusses how the division of responsibilities influences the implementation of master’s double degrees in Finnish-Russian partnerships. The research concentrates on cases of the internal allocation of responsibilities in double degrees within each partner university, including the role of central/faculty and administrative/academic departments. In addition, it investigates how Finnish and Russian universities allocate responsibilities for double degrees between one another. In conclusion, the chapter demonstrates the role of transaction costs challenging double degree implementation and university internationalization.

In: Responsibility of Higher Education Systems

Abstract

A collaboration among faculty and institutional researchers explored the relationship between High-Impact Practices and graduation outcomes at an urban university in the US. The study included examination of survey data and actual enrollment, mapping of courses to a list of practices, and a survey of degree programs to determine students’ exposure to High-Impact Practices and their effect on six-year graduation rates. Results indicated that student self-reports may be different from their actual exposure to these practices, and suggested a method for identifying high-impact practices in the curriculum, combining enrollment data with qualitative data gathered from faculty.