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In Mobilities and Cosmopolitanisms in African and Afrodiasporic Literatures, Anna-Leena Toivanen explores the representations and relationship of mobilities and cosmopolitanisms in Franco- and Anglophone African and Afrodiasporic literary texts from the 1990s to the 2010s. Representations of mobility practices are discussed against three categories of cosmopolitanism reflecting the privileged, pragmatic, and critical aspects of the concept.
The main scientific contribution of Toivanen’s book is enhancing dialogue between postcolonial literary studies and mobilities research. The book criticises reductive understandings of ‘mobility’ as a synonym for migration, and problematizes frequently made links between mobility and cosmopolitanism. Mobilities and Cosmopolitanisms adopts a comparative approach to Franco- and Anglophone African and Afrodiasporic literatures, often discussed separately despite their common themes and parallel paths.
Vorgestellt werden zwei unkonventionelle Beispiele neuerer Literatur, bei denen die Gestalt des Buchs, seine Materialität und seine Architektur, als konstitutive Dimensionen des literarischen Werks selbst zu gelten haben: Anne Carsons Leporello-Buch „Nox“ (2002, in engl. Sprache publiziert 2010) und Judith Schalanskys Band „Verzeichnis einiger Verluste“ (2018).
Carsons wie auch Schalanskys Buch entstanden als Dokumente des Erinnerns und nehmen Bezug auf Abwesendes bzw. Abwesende: Carson gestaltete „Nox“ als Memorialbuch für ihren verstorbenen Bruder; es enthält Fetzen und Reste persönlicher Erinnerungsstücke sowie fragmentarische Notizen. Schalanskys „Verzeichnis einiger Verluste“ bietet eine Zusammenstellung von Essays, Sachinformationen und Photos, die sich auf zwölf verschwundene Objekte, Orte, Kunstwerke oder natürliche Wesen beziehen.
A Study of Female Victims, Perpetrators and Detectives
Author: Sabine Binder
In this ground-breaking study, Sabine Binder analyses the complex ways in which female crime fictional victims, detectives and perpetrators in South African crime fiction resonate with widespread and persistent real crimes against women in post-apartheid South Africa. Drawing on a wide range of crime novels written over the last decade, Binder emphasises the genre’s feminist potential and critically maps its political work at the intersection of gender and race. Her study challenges the perception of crime fiction as a trivial genre and shows how, in South Africa at least, it provides a vibrant platform for social, cultural and ethical debates, exposing violence, misogyny and racism and shedding light on the problematics of law and justice for women faced with crime.
Author: Sergio Baldi
Following the publication in 2008 of Dictionnaire des emprunts arabes dans les langues de l'Afrique de l'Ouest et en Swahili, Dictionary of Arabic Loanwords in the Languages of Central and East Africa completes and offers the results of over 20 years of research on Arabic loanwords. The volume reveals the impact Arabic has had on African languages far beyond the area of its direct influence. As in the previous volume, the author analyses the loans in the greatest possible number of languages spoken in the area, based on the publications he found in the most important libraries of the main universities and academic institutions specialised in the field. By suggesting the most frequently used Arabic loanwords, the dictionary will be an invaluable guide to African-language lexicon compilers, amongst others.

Abstract

This essay explores a number of texts of the exophonic, or non-native literary production, respectively in Italian and German, of translingual authors Jhumpa Lahiri and Yoko Tawada. While the paper looks at how their dominant languages, respectively English and Japanese, continue to play a role in these writers’ non-native production, it focuses on the different approaches the two authors adopt to translingualism and the “linguistic family romance” metaphor, which they equally employ in highly imaginative ways in order to address both their condition of rootlessness and their attitudes to the notion of “mother tongue.” The essay argues that while Lahiri seems to remain a writer that does not contaminate languages (she is a writer in English, a writer in Italian, and a translator of Italian literature into English), Tawada brings German and Japanese together and dwells on the space of contamination between them in her production in German (and Japanese).

In: Journal of World Literature

Abstract

Existing studies, in Nigeria, have explored the interplay of physical and psychological diseases with a central focus on different psychiatric conditions as well as their social triggers. This article examines ambition as a major intensifier of neurotic and psychotic episodes in Femi Osofisan’s play, A Restless Run of Locusts. Freud’s psychoanalytic theory is adopted to account for the mental states of the characters, as manifested in their moods, conducts, gait, physical dispositions and utterances. The play is subjected to a critical analysis to reveal some psychiatric symptoms elicited by grave ambition, as exhibited by its protagonist and other characters featured in it. Besides a close reading of the primary text, secondary materials on the field of psychiatry and literature give insights to the study. The play reveals different psychotic and neurotic features which emerge from the fierce greed and ambition of the protagonist in his craving for political positions and privileges. Through verbal and behavioural displays, Osofisan’s protagonist undergoes a gradual descent into mental derangement, from neuroses to psychoses.

In: Matatu
In: Dictionary of Arabic Loanwords in the Languages of Central and East Africa
In: Dictionary of Arabic Loanwords in the Languages of Central and East Africa
In: Women and Crime in Post-Transitional South African Crime Fiction
In: Women and Crime in Post-Transitional South African Crime Fiction
In: Women and Crime in Post-Transitional South African Crime Fiction
In: Women and Crime in Post-Transitional South African Crime Fiction
In: Women and Crime in Post-Transitional South African Crime Fiction

Abstract

Al-Ghuluwu fi al-amsal al-arabiy (Postproverbial) is a new trend in modern Arabic studies. It is a way to gain the perceptions of learners of the language into Afro-Arabic and Yoruba cultures in contemporary times. Through the learning of the subject matter, University of Ibadan students of Arabic Language and Literature explore how much common philosophy is shared between postproverbial expressions in Arabic and Yoruba languages. Afro-Arabic postproverbial demonstrates the trends of modernity within the culture. It absorbs and transforms wisdom accumulated over the few years with the experience of students in their various localities. This paper investigates the exposure to postproverbiality in Arabic among the students of Arabic language and literature who are predominantly Yoruba in the University of Ibadan and how the practice of postproverbials transforms their perceptions and values of Yoruba and Afro-Arab cultural concepts. Thus, two questions are raised: to what extent does the use of postproverbials in the Arabic literature course in the University of Ibadan shed light on Yoruba cultural aspects not regularly covered in Arabic Proverbs? How does the use of postproverbials in the Arabic literature course promote a new understanding among the students and make them discover and reassess their values and preferences in the modern time? The theoretical framework of the paper is adopted from A. Raji-Oyelade’s “Postproverbials in Yoruba Culture: A Playful Blasphemy”. The result of this study indicates that students employed their basic knowledge of Arabic language, coupled with their Yoruba cultural background, to re-create a number of postproverbial texts within the context of Arabic culture. It also exhibits their level of consciousness in the modern times.

In: Matatu

Abstract

Language acquisition is a fundamental phenomenon in the linguistic enterprise. Chomsky claims that, “the human brain provides an array of capacities that enter into the use and understanding of Language (the language faculty (FL))”. Using the descriptive approach, this paper explores, justifies, and determines the place of the human linguistic capacity to articulate and engage postproverbials vis-a-vis Chomsky’s model of grammar and few scholarly positions. This article aims at providing evidence that, compared to others; Chomsky’s idea of linguistic competence is the most appropriate account for the use and understanding of postproverbials. The study revealed that the first sentences/the intermediate proficiency stage presents humans with the capacity to develop, use, and understand postproverbials, and this attains full development at the advanced fluency stage to establish postproverbial as one of the capacities that the human brain provides, located in the FL, and that its use and understanding is consciously employed.

In: Matatu

Abstract

The scholarship of change and transformations in proverbs has become an emergent industry in contemporary African studies. The term in transgressive paremiography used for this phenomenon of transformation is called postproverbials. Postproverbiality in Fulfulde is one illustration of the engagement with perspectives of modernities, and aspects of change in worldviews among the Ful’be. “Five and five does not make ten, …” is a signal Ful’be proverbial clause which represents the early interactional history of trade, political and jurisprudent relations between the Ful’be and the predominant Hausa communities of Northern Nigeria. The proverb has experienced a radical reception and turning, based on contemporary social relations and literacy. It is employed in this essay as a symbolic example of how change in proverb construction can also be a challenge to received history. Thirteen pairs of Ful’be proverbs and postproverbials will be deployed to establish the phenomenon of transgressive proverb-making among contemporary Ful’be speakers. The essay will highlight the peculiar forms of extensions, adaptations and cutterage that have been invested into the making of new radical Fulbe proverbs, usually by a younger generation of Fulfulde speakers whose attempt (inadvertent or deliberate) is ultimately to break conventions through newly invented proverbs.

In: Matatu

Abstract

This article explores the syntax-semantics nexus of Shona postproverbials in the contemporary Zimbabwean society. In terms of syntax, Shona postproverbials are aligned to the following types of sentences found in the Shona language; substantival, verbal, and a combination of both. Like traditional proverbs, there is no postproverbial that takes the form of the ideophonic sentence. The communicative power of postproverbials is an inherent, inbuilt, and internal property stemming from their syntactic and lexical properties. The postproverbial forms, studied in this article, exhibit innovation and ingenuity of the users. The communicative force of the postproverbials arises from the correspondence and cross-correspondence of the structures and grammatical items that constitute them. Congruence and contrast of the lexical items found in the postproverbials also contribute to meanings. The study established that, just like the traditional proverbs, postproverbials are pithy and terse philosophical statements that resonate with a people’s collective experience. In most cases, the postproverbials provide a conduit for people to comment on issues regarded as politically ‘taboo’ and sensitive in a society where the state does not tolerate open criticism.

In: Matatu
In: Matatu

Abstract

Extant studies have investigated postproverbial expressions from sociological, feminist, and philosophical perspectives with insufficient attention paid to the linguistic representations of social identity in such expressions. This study, therefore, examines how social identities are constructed through postproverbials among Yoruba youths with a view to exploring the social realities that conditioned the representations of new identities in such expressions. The study adopts Halliday’s Systemic Functional Linguistics and Tajfel and Tuner’s Social Identity Theory as framework. Ten (10) postproverbial expressions, which are from anonymous and the written collections of Yoruba proverbs by Yoruba scholars form the data. Linguistic substitutions and code-mixings characterise such expressions. Postproverbials are a conveyor of rationalist, religious, hedonistic, and economic identities, which are conditioned by western influence and are transported by the generation of conscious Yoruba youths. The paper inferred that, though proverbs and postproverbials are context-dependent, postproverbials explicate a paradigm shift in the postmodernist discourse and refract Nigerian socio-cultural realities.

In: Matatu
Author: Ahmad Kipacha

Abstract

The political campaign speeches can be used not only as platform to promote election manifestos of the candidates but also as communication channels imbued with creative manipulation of words, phrases, sayings and proverbial expressions to lure voters. Of interest in this study, is how some erudite public figures in Tanzania tend to interspace their political campaign speeches with proverbial elements. As campaign speeches aim to weaken political rivals, the use of subverted form of standard adage became inevitable on the process of waging verbal war to disarm opponents’ argumentative style, didactic wisdom and explanatory prowess. This paper goes beyond the exploration of standard proverbial expressions in political campaign speeches, to specifically target the deliberate modification, parody, subversion on existing proverbs and proverbial expressions in Swahili by the two major political parties of CCM and UKAWA as contested in the 2015 Tanzania general election campaigns.

In: Matatu
In: Matatu

Abstract

This paper evaluates postproverbial (re)constructions of selected Igbo proverbs and the ‘altering alternatives’ regenerated from the original Igbo proverbs. Eighteen randomly selected Igbo proverbs, the proverbial expressions and their postproverbial (re)constructions were subjected to critical analysis. The study revealed that there are noticeable changings in rendering of the selected proverbs. These changings occur largely either due to lack of an in-depth knowledge in the usage of the traditional proverbs, disconnection with the custodians/sources of the Igbo proverbs, urbanisation influence on the Igbo speakers or both. Hence the manufacturing of the ‘altering alternatives’, known as postproverbials. The paper, therefore, urges Igbo language speakers and the would-be users, to draw closer by retracing their step in the choice and usage of Igbo proverbs against the near-overbearing influence of proverbials on the autochthonous, symbolic, semantic, and philosophical essence of Igbo traditional proverbs.

In: Matatu

Abstract

Studies on Jack Mapanje’s poetry are largely postcolonial and on the poet’s use of Malawian lore but hardly on his use of proverbs. Yet Mapanje deploys proverbs sufficiently in his poetry for the deployment to merit study. Therefore, this study examines the deployment of the umbilical-cordage-of-peculiar-hounds proverb in selected poems from Mapanje’s Skipping Without Ropes. It adopts phenomenology. The choice of the theory is to allow the critic to move with aplomb between the four selected poems in a resolute hunt for the essence of the proverb in the poetry. The study reveals that Mapanje ruptures the original meaning of the proverb which is about choice and thirst to see the wonder and beauty of creation as cause to travel to a distant land but deploys it to treat flight from barbarous tyranny. The poetry describes state abuse of dissenters, peine forte er dure, imprisonment and death, and threats to life as cause enough to flee one’s country. The rhetorical transformation of the proverb in semantic terms makes the idiom behind the poetry postproverbial. The study also advances Mapanje’s penchant for “rhetoric of animality”, ritual aesthetics and pit-death symbolism and recommends that Mapanje’s deployment of proverb in other poetry merits further study.

In: Matatu