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Author: Piero Boitani
Anagnorisis has been called ‘one of the great works of comparative literary criticism of our time’ is a book that spans the millennia, the adventures of Ulysses in Homer and God’s mysterious appearance to Abraham in Genesis, down not only to Joyce’s Ulysses and Thomas Mann’s Joseph and his Brothers, but also to Borges’s ‘The Immortal’ and Derek Walcott Omeros.
‘Anagnorisis’ means ‘recognition’. Aristotle defined it simply as ‘the passage from ignorance to knowledge’. But the knowledge one gains in anagnorisis is neither scientific nor abstract – it is living knowledge in the flesh, as Euripides’ Helen understood when, seeing her husband again after many years, she exclaimed: ‘to recognize those we love is a god.
Richard Kilvington was one of the most talented Oxford Calculators. His influence on late medieval philosophy and theology remains unquestionable. He made a name for himself with his logical treatise Sophismata, which was soon followed by a series of three commentaries on Aristotle’s works and a commentary on Peter Lombard’s Sentences. Richard Kilvington on the Capacity of Created Being, Infinity, and Being Simultaneously in Rome and Paris by Monika Michałowska presents a critical edition of question 3 from Kilvington’s Quaestiones super libros Sententiarum, complete with an introduction to the edition and a guide to Kilvington’s theological concepts. Kilvington’s theological question commentary enjoyed considerable popularity and became a source of continuous inspiration for Oxonian and Parisian masters.
Editor: Dragos Calma
Reading Proclus and the Book of Causes, published in three volumes, is a fresh, comprehensive understanding of the history of Neoplatonism from the 9th to the 16th century. The impact of the Elements of Theology and the Book of Causes is reconsidered on the basis of newly discovered manuscripts and evidences. This second volume revises widely accepted hypotheses about the reception of the Proclus’ text in Byzantium and the Caucasus, and about the context that made possible the composition of the Book of Causes and its translations into Latin and Hebrew. The contributions offer a unique, comparative perspective on the various ways a pagan author was acculturated to the Abrahamic traditions.
Volume Editor: John Marenbon
This collection looks at the disciplines and their context in the late thirteenth and fourteenth-century universities. Cambridge University, usually forgotten, is made the starting point, from which the essays look out to Oxford and Paris. 1317, when the King’s Scholars (later King’s Hall) were established in Cambridge is the focal date. To this new perspective is added another. Ideas, their formation, development and transformation are studied within their social and institutional context, but with expert attention to their content. Following an Introduction, making the case for the importance of Cambridge (Marenbon), and a study of King’s Hall (Courtenay), the contributions discuss Cambridge books (Thomson), Logic (Ebbesen), Aristotelian science (Costa), Theology (Fitzpatrick and Cross), Medicine (Jacquart), Law (Helmholz) and the universities and English vernacular culture (Knox).

The contributors are Richard Cross, Iacopo Costa, William Courtenay, Sten Ebbesen, Antonia Fitzpatrick, R.H. Helmholz, Danielle Jacquart, Philip Knox, and Rodney Thomson.
A Philosophical Study of the Commentary Tradition c.1260–c.1410
Author: Juhana Toivanen
In The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy Juhana Toivanen investigates what medieval philosophers meant when they argued that human beings are political animals by nature. He analyses the notion of ‘political animal’ from various perspectives and shows its relevance to philosophical discussions concerning the foundations of human sociability, ethics, and politics.
Medieval authors believed that social life stems from the biological and rational nature of human beings, and that collaboration with other people promotes prosperity and good life. Toivanen provides a detailed philosophical interpretation of this view across a wide range of authors, including unedited manuscript sources. As the first monograph-length study on the topic, The Political Animal sheds new light on this significant period in western political thought.
Author: Mark Thakkar

Abstract

Two recent publications have greatly increased the amount of Wyclif available in translation: the Trialogus, translated by Stephen Lahey, and a thematic anthology translated by Stephen Penn. This review article documents the failings that make these translations worse than useless. A post mortem leads the author to claim that the publication of these volumes, the first of which has already been warmly received, is a sign of a gathering crisis in medieval studies, and one that we should take steps to avert.

In: Vivarium

Abstract

This research note identifies for the first time the principium on book I of the Sentences by the prolific polymath Henry of Langenstein (†1397). This discovery, when combined with the four principia of the Augustinian Denis of Modena, provides the evidence necessary to demonstrate that Langenstein lectured on the Sentences at Paris in 1371-1372. The note also establishes the identity of the other eight bachelors of theology who participated in the principial debates that year.

In: Vivarium
In: Vivarium
Author: Dragos Calma

Abstract

Pierre Hadot famously claimed that, between Antiquity and German Idealism, Western philosophy had lost its practical role of guiding the life of the practitioner. Scholars who challenged this view focused on two medieval models. This article argues that the overlooked work Colliget principiorum iuris naturalis, divini et humani philosophice doctrinalium by Heymericus de Campo postulates a third model. On the basis of St. Paul’s teaching about the “inner man,” Heymericus reconsiders the Aristotelian doctrines of abstraction and of being as such in relation to the Neoplatonic model of intellectual progression and interior conversion. In a realist conceptual framework, he holds that only metaphysics reflects the true nature of the human being inasmuch as it presupposes a way of life that assumes both the interaction with and withdrawal from the sensible world. However, Heymericus’ theory is neither limited to nor conditioned by Christian principles, but by Peripatetic philosophy (understood in the broad, Albertinian tradition).

In: Vivarium
In: Vivarium
Author: Stephen Read

Abstract

The Oxford Calculator Roger Swyneshed put forward three provocative claims in his treatise on insolubles, written in the early 1330s, of which the second states that there is a formally valid inference with true premises and false conclusion. His example deployed the Liar paradox as the conclusion of the inference: ‘The conclusion of this inference is false, so this conclusion is false’. His account of insolubles supported his claim that the conclusion is false, and so the premise, referring to the conclusion, would seem to be true. But what is his account of validity that can allow true premises to lead to a false conclusion? This article considers Roger’s own account, as well as that of Paul of Venice, writing some sixty years later, whose account of the truth and falsehood of insolubles followed Roger’s closely. Paul endorsed Roger’s three claims. But their accounts of validity were different. The question is whether these accounts are coherent and support Paul’s claim in his Logica Magna that he endorsed all the normal rules of inference.

In: Vivarium
In: Vivarium
Volume Editors: Michael Cusato and Steven J. McMichael
This volume is a collection of essays written by colleagues and friends in honor of Michael W. Blastic, O.F.M., on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The contributing scholars endeavored to address significant issues within the academic areas in which Fr. Blastic has taught and published. Three essays are devoted to the Writings of Saint Francis; seven are dedicated to particular issues in Franciscan history, hagiography, spirituality and several texts; five deal specifically with women during the Middle Ages; and three final essays explore aspects of Franciscan theology and philosophy. Fr. Michael Blastic has taught at the Washington Theological Union, the Franciscan Institute at St. Bonaventure University and Siena College and served as a widely-respected retreat master.
Contributors are Maria Pia Alberzoni, Luciano Bertazzo, O.F.M. Conv., Joshua C. Benson, Aaron Canty, Joseph Chinnici, O.F.M., Michael F. Cusato, O.F.M., Jay M. Hammond, J.A. Wayne Hellmann, O.F.M. Conv., Timothy J. Johnson, Lezlie Knox, Pietro Maranesi, Steven J. McMichael, O.F.M. Conv., Benedikt Mertens, O.F.M., Catherine M. Mooney, Luigi Pellegrini, Michael Robson, and William J. Short, O.F.M.