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Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert. Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben. In der Einleitung werden die Prinzipien der Arbeit erläutert. Teil 1 (Alte Kirche) behandelt die Entstehung einer christlichen Bildkunst am Grabe (auf Sarkophagen und in Katakomben) und den späteren Übergang in die Kirchdekoration. Nach gleichen Prinzipien werden in Teil 2 die Bildkunst des Mittelalters, in Teil 3 die der Neuzeit und in Teil 4 die andersartige Entwicklung in der Ostkirche geschildert.
Volume Editor: Jennifer Wasmuth
Der öffentliche Diskurs zeichnet sich gegenwärtig vielfach durch eine Verhärtung der Fronten und die mangelnde Bereitschaft aus, sich auf die Gegenposition einzulassen. Diese Tendenzen lassen sich auch im ökumenischen Kontext beobachten, und schnell ist hier wie dort der Fundamentalismus-Vorwurf zur Hand.
Was meint dieser Vorwurf genau? Gegen wen richtet er sich? Ist Fundamentalismus nur eine polemische Etikettierung von Positionen, die nicht der eigenen entsprechen? Oder lassen sich unter dem Begriff politische und religiöse Gruppierungen fassen, die eine klar erkennbare Agenda verfolgen? Diesen Fragen geht der vorliegende Sammelband nach, indem er in seinen Beiträgen auf die Begriffsgeschichte und die Bedeutung von „Fundamentalismus“ in verschiedenen geographischen, konfessionellen und religiösen Kontexten reflektiert.
In Theologising with the Sacred ‘Prostitutes’ of South India, Eve Rebecca Parker theologises with the Dalit women who from childhood have been dedicated to village goddesses and used as ‘sacred’ sex workers. Parker uses ethnographic, anthropological, theological, hermeneutical and historical research and analysis in order to critically engage with the lived religiosity and daily struggles of the dedicated women, known as devadāsīs. In doing so, she works towards an Indecent Dalit Liberation Theology that challenges systems of oppression and cultures of impunity, including casteism, sexism, classism and a history of socio-political and religious marginalisation. The result is a profound theologising of struggle and resistance with the sexual narratives of the oppressed.
El uso teológico de metáforas de comer y beber
Author: Fernando Soler
Este libro presenta un estudio exhaustivo sobre el uso teológico de las metáforas de comer y beber en la obra de Orígenes de Alejandría, considerando sus nociones fisiológicas y técnicas exegéticas.
Orígenes de Alejandría es uno de los teólogos más importantes del cristianismo temprano. Su teología tiene una coherencia y profundidad que ha establecido el estándar para varios temas, como la Trinidad, la Cristología y la antropología. A través de las metáforas, realiza dos tareas desafiantes: profundizar en el misterio de Dios y comunicarlo. En este libro, el autor estudia los usos teológicos de Orígenes de las metáforas del comer y el beber, incluyendo el texto de las recientemente publicadas „Homilías sobre los Salmos“. Este estudio confirma no sólo los aspectos clásicos de la teología de Orígenes, sino que también muestra nuevas perspectivas, especialmente sobre las relaciones intratrinitarias y la reciprocidad en la relación entre Dios y los seres humanos.
The Indigenous ‘Injīliyyūn’ in the Arab-Muslim Context of Syria-Lebanon
After-Mission touches on on three questions.The first question is about self-perception and identity-formation strategies, and the various views that we have on the Protestants’ relation to their Arab Muslim Middle Eastern context. This will furnish the basis for the ensuing parts, as it will provide the study with coherent and analytical readings of the cultural situation and intellectual views of the Arab Eastern Protestants in their Sitz im Leben from the perspective of the hermeneutic tripod of ‘identity–othering–relationality’.

The second question, about the theological dimension, asks what kind of a theological discourse do the Protestants need to develop, and how do they need to re-form their own theological heritage, in such a manner that will allow them to heal the historical enmity and suspicion towards them from the Eastern Orthodox Christian community in the region? How should they re-think their traditional view on theological subjects common to them and the Eastern Christian tradition? Traditional Protestant attitudes towards Eastern Christianity, which have been viewed through the lens of evangelicalism and mission, have failed to grant the Protestants an influential and truly indigenous presence in the region and have led to them being constantly accused of being a foreign transplant and alien entity. In the light of this, it is clear that going beyond missiology and traditional evangelicalism demands re-thinking certain mutually shared but contentious theological subjects from a new perspective with the focus on more constructive attempts to build fellowship through dialogue.

Finally, the third question touches on the Protestants’ future in the Arab Muslim Middle East by viewing this inquiry from a broader perspective that is related to all the Middle Eastern Christian communities’ presence and role in the Muslim-majority context. It will discuss questions about the kind of presence and role that Christians, Protestants included, should hope to play in order to guarantee survival and a continuing presence in the region. The question of identity formation, and the managing of difference without trapping it in the mud of ‘otherizing and self-otherizing’, will also be tackled, so that the theological dimension is integrated with the broader, multifaceted contextual one.
Author: Darren Carlson
In Christianity and Conversion among Migrants, Darren Carlson explores the faith, beliefs, and practices of migrants and refugees as well as the Christian organizations serving them between 2014–2018 in Athens, Greece. This is the first major study of migrant faith communities and refugee centers conducted in Athens. The study traces the travel stories of participants as they leave their home countries and migrate to Athens.

Darren Carlson discusses the ways evangelical and Pentecostal Christians served migrants along their journey, how churches and specific refugee centers served and proclaimed the gospel, and the impact Christian witness had on migrants, particularly Muslims, who were converting to evangelical Christian faith.
Theo-political Reflections on Contemporary Politics in Ecumenical Conversation
Volume Editors: Alexei Bodrov and Stephen M. Garrett
Theology and the Political: Theo-political Reflections on Contemporary Politics in Ecumenical Conversation, edited by Alexei Bodrov and Stephen M. Garrett, is the fruit of Orthodox, Catholic, and Protestant conversations from East and West concerning the retrieval of theological discourse for political praxis, theo-political structural analysis of secularity/post-secularity, and distinct political engagement from varying Christian traditions that not only offer political critique but criticism of its particular tradition.

This edited volume is animated by the motif of political action as witness in a missional key and makes a unique interdisciplinary contribution to the field of political theology that invites further reflection on the gospel instantiated in various cultural contexts in light of the boundary-crossing nature of mission and theological discourse.
Volume Editors: Hélène Vu Thanh and Ines G. Županov
Trade and Finance in Global Missions (16th-18th Centuries) is a collection of twelve articles focusing on missionary economic practices, often perceived as an important tool in their spiritual and missionary endeavours, but also raising controversies in Europe and in the overseas missions. Missionaries, just like merchants and other investors, sought the most profitable ventures and tapped into transcontinental flow of capital during the first globalisation. All the chapters in this volume address the question of Catholic missionary economy in the early modern period by looking into concrete cases of the opening, financing, growth and preservation of Christian missions and related institutions such as churches, colleges and other permanent endowments in Asia, Europe and Latin America.
Volume Editors: Martha Frederiks and Dorottya Nagy
World Christianity publications proliferate but the issue of methodology has received little attention. World Christianity: Methodological Considerations addresses this lacuna and explores the methodological ramifications of the World Christianity turn. In twelve chapters scholars from various academic backgrounds (anthropology, religious studies, history, missiology, intercultural studies, theology, and patristics) as well as of multiple cultural and national belongings investigate methodological issues (e.g. methods, use of sources, choosing a unit of analysis, terminology, conceptual categories,) relevant to World Christianity debates. In a closing chapter the editors Frederiks and Nagy converge the findings and sketch the outlines of what they coin as a ‘World Christianity approach’, a multidisciplinary and multiple perspective approach to study Christianity/ies’ plurality and diversity in past and present.
Author: Paul Shore

Abstract

The forty-one years between the Society of Jesus’s papal suppression in 1773 and its eventual restoration in 1814 remain controversial, with new research and interpretations continually appearing. Shore’s narrative approaches these years, and the period preceding the suppression, from a new perspective that covers individuals not usually discussed in works dealing with this topic. As well as examining the contributions of former Jesuits to fields as diverse as ethnology—a term and concept pioneered by an ex-Jesuit—and library science, where Jesuits and ex-Jesuits laid the groundwork for the great advances of the nineteenth century, the essay also explores the period the exiled Society spent in the Russian Empire. It concludes with a discussion of the Society’s restoration in the broader context of world history.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

Abstract

In An Overview of the Pre-Suppression Society of Jesus in Spain, Patricia W. Manning offers a survey of the Society of Jesus in Spain from its origins in Ignatius of Loyola’s early preaching to the aftereffects of its expulsion. Rather than nurture the nascent order, Loyola’s homeland was often ambivalent. His pre-Jesuit freelance sermonizing prompted investigations. The young Society confronted indifference and interference from the Spanish monarchy and outright opposition from other religious orders. This essay outlines the order’s ministerial and pedagogical activities, its relationship with women and with royal institutions, including the Spanish Inquisition, and Spanish members’ roles in theological debates concerning casuistry, free will, and the immaculate conception. It also considers the impact of Jesuits’ non-religious writings.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

Abstract

A common narrative characterizes Egyptian Christians as a people beset by persecution, struggling to survive in a hostile Muslim context. Other narratives seek to smooth over the differences between Christian and Muslim Egyptians to emphasize national unity and shared citizenship. The revolutionary upheavals starting in 2011 brought questions of subjectivity and agency in shaping Egypt’s future to the forefront of public debate. In spite of continued limitations to free speech and political participation, Egyptian Christians are engaging creatively in prophetic discourse and community-building praxis, contributing to the construction of a revitalized theology of public life. Protestant theologians Andrea Zaki, Safwat Marzouk, and Anne Zaki, for example, draw on the resources of the biblical tradition to think critically about their own subjectivity as Egyptian Christians and about the complex challenges and the hopeful promise facing these communities as they seek effective ways to participate in public life.

In: Exchange
Author: Tala Raheb

Abstract

In describing Christianity in the Middle East, scholars often highlight religious oppression, especially in relation to the larger Islamic context. Such contentious descriptions often cast Christians in the role of dhimmis, who are tolerated but not regarded as equal members of Muslim societies. Only in recent years some scholars have begun to modify their depictions of Christians and Christian-Muslim relations in the Middle East. While Christians in the Middle East have experienced and in certain regions continue to experience persecution, solely portraying them as victims does not do justice to the reality on the ground. By means of a case study on Palestine, I argue that an examination of the interaction between sharia (Islamic law) and Christian personal status laws sheds a different light on Christian identity and Christian-Muslim relations in the Middle East, and demonstrates the agency of Palestinian Christian communities in this respect.

In: Exchange