This edited volume focuses on gender and love as emerging through complex “entanglements and weavings”. At a time when constructionist ideas are losing support, we interrogate theoretical paradigms to assess if constructionist notions still hold value or if new approaches are needed to address the effects of materiality and non-human agency. Without claiming any unison or definite answers, we offer situated, agential cuts into gender and love in various discursive-material phenomena, including Biblical and Rabbinic literature, ecosexual performance art, the writings of Ursula Le Guin and Angela Carter, butch identities, Bengali folktales, Ferzan Özpetek’s cinema, Golem literature, sexual pursuits in Danish nightlife, mother-daughter relationships, women warriors in the PKK, and BDSM performances. Artistic photographer Sara Davidmann has contributed to the book with the cover illustration and a creative afterword including seven photographs on the interaction between the photographer, her studio, and LGBTQ+ people.
Geographies of Affect in Contemporary Literature and Visual Culture opens a dialogue between the literary and filmic works produced in Central Europe and in the Anglophone world. It relies on the concept of translocality to explore this corpus, offering new readings of contemporary Hungarian films as well as urban fiction and poetry in English. Calling attention to the role of affect in imagining city space, the volume investigates György Pálfi’s Taxidermia, Béla Tarr’s Family Nest, Teju Cole’s Open City, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, China Miéville’s Un Lun Dun, Chimamanda Adichie’s Americanah, and Patrick Neate’s City of Tiny Lights, among many other urban narratives. Contributors examine both widely explored emotions and under-researched affects, such as shame, fascination, and the role of withdrawal in contemporary literature and culture.

Contributors: Tamás Bényei, Imola Bülgözdi, Fanni Feldmann, Zsolt Győri, Ágnes Györke, Brigitta Hudácskó, György Kalmár, Anna Kérchy, Márta Kőrösi, Jennifer Leetsch, Katalin Pálinkás, Miklós Takács, Pieter Vermeulen.
Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French analyses the literary transgressions of women’s writing in French since the turn of the twenty-first century in the works of major figures, such as Annie Ernaux and Véronique Tadjo, of the now established writers of the ‘nouvelle génération’, such as Marie Darrieussecq and Virginie Despentes, and in some of the most exciting and innovative authors from across the francosphère, from Nine Antico to Maïssa Bey and Chloé Delaume.
Pushing the boundaries of current thinking about normative and queer identities, local and global communities, family and kinship structures, bodies and sexualities, creativity and the literary canon, these authors pose the potential of reading and writing to also effectuate change in the world beyond the text.

Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French étudie les transgressions littéraires dans l’écriture des femmes en français depuis le début du XXIe siècle. L’analyse porte sur les oeuvres de figures majeures, telles qu’Annie Ernaux et Véronique Tadjo, d’auteures bien établies de la ‘nouvelle génération’, parmi lesquelles Marie Darrieussecq et Virginie Despentes, et de certaines des auteures les plus innovantes de la francosphère, de Nine Antico à Maïssa Bey en passant par Chloé Delaume. Repoussant les frontières de la pensée dominante sur les identités normatives ou queer, les communautés locales ou globales, les structures familiales ou de parenté, les corps ou les sexualités, la créativité ou le canon littéraire, ces auteures développent un potentiel de lecture et d’écriture porteur de changements au-delà du texte. Contributors /avec des contributions de: Ounissa Ait Benali, Jean Anderson, Kate Averis, Marzia Caporale, Dawn M. Cornelio, Sandra Daroczi, Sophie Guignard, Élise Hugueny-Léger, Irène Le Roy Ladurie, Siobhán McIlvanney, Michèle A. Schaal, Marta Segarra, Marinella Termite, Lyn Thomas, Antonia Wimbush
A Study of Female Victims, Perpetrators and Detectives
Author: Sabine Binder
In this ground-breaking study, Sabine Binder analyses the complex ways in which female crime fictional victims, detectives and perpetrators in South African crime fiction resonate with widespread and persistent real crimes against women in post-apartheid South Africa. Drawing on a wide range of crime novels written over the last decade, Binder emphasises the genre’s feminist potential and critically maps its political work at the intersection of gender and race. Her study challenges the perception of crime fiction as a trivial genre and shows how, in South Africa at least, it provides a vibrant platform for social, cultural and ethical debates, exposing violence, misogyny and racism and shedding light on the problematics of law and justice for women faced with crime.
Author: Elina Pyy
In Women and War in Roman Epic, Elina Pyy discusses the narrative and ideological functions of gender in the works of Virgil, Lucan, Statius, Silius Italicus and Valerius Flaccus. By examining the themes of violence, death, guilt, grief, and anger in their epics, she offers an account of the intertextual tradition of the genre and its socio-political background. Through a combination of classical narratology and Julia Kristeva’s subjectivity theory, Pyy scrutinises how gendered marginality is constructed in the genre and how it contributes to the fashioning of Roman imperial identity. Focusing on the ambiguous elements of epic, the study looks beyond the binary oppositions between the Self and the Other, male and female, and Roman and barbarian.
Author: Yun Zhang
In Engendering the Woman Question, Zhang Yun adopts a new approach to examining the early Chinese women’s periodical press. Rather than seeing this new print and publishing genre as a gendered site coded as either “feminine” or “masculine,” this book approaches it as a mixed-gender public space where both men and women were intellectually active and involved in dynamic interactions to determine the contours of their discursive encounters.

Drawing upon a variety of novel textual modes such as polemical essays, historical biography, public speech, and expository essays, this book opens a window onto men’s and women’s gender-specific approaches to a series of prominent topics central to the Chinese woman question in the early twentieth century.
In: Engendering the Woman Question: Men, Women, and Writing in China’s Early Periodical Press
In Heroines, Harpies, and Housewives, Martha Moffitt Peacock provides a novel interpretive approach to the artistic practice of Imaging Women of Consequence in the Dutch Golden Age. From the beginnings of the new Republic, visual celebrations of famous heroines who crossed gender boundaries by fighting in the Revolt against Spain or by distinguishing themselves in arts and letters became an essential and significant cultural tradition that reverberated throughout the long seventeenth century. This collective memory of consequential heroines who equaled, or outshone, men is frequently reflected in empowering representations of other female archetypes: authoritative harpies and noble housewives. Such enabling imagery helped in the structuring of gender norms that positively advanced a powerful female identity in Dutch society.
In: Engendering the Woman Question: Men, Women, and Writing in China’s Early Periodical Press
In: Engendering the Woman Question: Men, Women, and Writing in China’s Early Periodical Press
This volume honors the work of a scholar who has been active in the field of early modern history for over four decades. In that time, Susan Karant-Nunn’s work challenged established orthodoxies, pushed the envelope of historical genres, and opened up new avenues of research and understanding, which came to define the contours of the field itself. Like this rich career, the chapters in this volume cover a broad range of historical genres from social, cultural and art history, to the history of gender, masculinity, and emotion, and range geographically from the Holy Roman Empire, France, and the Netherlands, to Geneva and Austria. Based on a vast array of archival and secondary sources, the contributions open up new horizons of research and commentary on all aspects of early modern life.

Contributors: James Blakeley, Robert J. Christman, Victoria Christman, Amy Nelson Burnett, Pia Cuneo, Ute Lotz-Heumann, Amy Newhouse, Marjorie Elizabeth Plummer, Helmut Puff, Lyndal Roper, Karen E. Spierling, James D. Tracy, Mara R. Wade, David Whitford, and Charles Zika.
Author: Amy Newhouse

Abstract

This chapter investigates the complex value of cloth goods used to care for diseased bodies in sixteenth-century Nuremberg. Clothes provided physically adaptive barriers against the malodorous emanations of leprosy, plague, and syphilis victims. Authorities viewed the odiferous bodies of the sick not only as unseemly, but they believed that their foul smells violated city airs with disease-producing miasma. The solution of cloth materials, however, proved to be problematic because the fabrics became soiled with human odors. Therefore, the absorbent, transferable, and portable material properties of cloth meant that unsuspecting or malicious city inhabitants disseminated the miasmic odors of the diseased bodies as they used, washed, and traded contaminated fabrics within the city. Beleaguered city leaders designated city spaces and personnel to neutralize the threat of even the smallest piece of clothing or bandaging. This study reveals how Nuremberg’s leaders were in a continuous process of solving physical problems which emerged in the course of city life. They not only needed spaces and materials to care for the diseased, but they also required places and procedures to cleanse the materials used for that care. Ultimately, it was this reactive adaptation of city space that shaped the use of landscape and fashioned daily life in the city.

In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe
Author: James Tracy

Abstract

Under the staunchly Catholic Austrian Habsburgs, David Ungnad (d. 1603) served as both a high government official and a Lutheran lay leader. At a time when Lutheran aristocrats like Ungnad dominated the provincial estates, Emperor Maximilian II chose Ungnad as his ambassador to the Ottoman court (1573–78). In 1576, on orders from Vienna, he sent a long circular letter to the Austrian estates. Hoping to gain their approval of higher taxes for border defense, he explained the current circumstances that precluded other possible means of protecting the border. This essay explores what Ungnad said, as it were, between the lines, speaking as a Lutheran to a largely Lutheran audience. He argued that Maximilian was not to blame for his failure to win the elective crown of Poland-Lithuania, a multi-confessional state. As a warning to true Christians in the West, he pointed to the “collapse” of the Greek Orthodox Church in the Ottoman Empire, where Church offices were sold to the highest bidder by Ottoman officials. In other words, the Habsburg body politic that afforded only limited autonomy to Lutherans was nonetheless worth fighting for. Ungnad was a true Lutheran politique, rarely discussed by contemporaries but of vital importance behind the scenes.

In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe

Abstract

Although scholars have begun exploring aging for women in early modern Europe, what this phase of life meant for nuns and former nuns after the early Reformation has not yet been researched. This chapter examines the petitions sent to sequestration officials in electoral Saxony by women facing poverty due to widowhood, disability, or inability to care for their children or themselves from the 1530s through the 1570s. Most women writing such letters detailed specific moments in their lives after the reform of convents as a rhetorical strategy to get or increase financial assistance from the elector. One striking aspect of these petitions is that although the life path of women who remained in the convent and those who left diverged immediately after the Reformation, ultimately all the women experienced significant hardships and financial insecurity as they aged. Most of the women, whether or not they left the convent, detailed the lack of support from family, local communities, and regional communities to assist them when needed. In these instances, many of the women inside and outside of the convent turned to their previous convent community to share information on how to get additional aid.

In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe
Author: Charles Zika

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to build on recent insights into the centrality of compassion in late medieval and early modern European culture by exploring the visual evidence for its influence on regulations concerning capital punishment and concern for the spiritual welfare of those condemned to death. The focus is on images of contemporary execution and of the Crucifixion of Christ on Calvary, the model for any Christian condemned to death. Images of contemporary execution reflect growing concerns and practices, such as the provision of comforters to minister to the condemned in the days leading up to their deaths, as well as the availability of confession and communion to facilitate a “good death.” Representations of the Crucifixion in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries increasingly show Calvary as an execution site with gallows, wheels and crosses. Depictions of the Way of the Cross in the sixteenth century also begin to mirror the contemporary processions of criminals to their deaths, frequently showing the two thieves with their clerical comforters, whose role it was to show their charges Christian compassion in order to ensure their penitence and ultimate salvation by reflecting on Christ’s passion and the penitence of the good thief, Dismas.

In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe
In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe
In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe
In: Cultural Shifts and Ritual Transformations in Reformation Europe