Le nouveau fantastique de Jean-Pierre Andrevon analyse les facettes étranges du fantastique de Jean-Pierre Andrevon, écrivain contemporain appelé le « King » ou « Lovecraft » français. Andrevon propose une nouvelle vision du fantastique ancré profondément dans le quotidien contemporain, en apparence monotone et banal, dans lequel évoluent aussi bien ses personnages que ses lecteurs. L’auteur révèle ainsi le revers angoissant du monde, qui devient une source d’horreur puissante car familière au lecteur : catastrophes naturelles (pandémies mystérieuses, désastres climatiques, fin de l’Anthropocène) et historiques (guerres, totalitarismes), problèmes sociaux et psychologiques (folie, psychoses collectives, solitude). Un signe emblématique du fantastique andrevonien est également son dialogue avec le cinéma d’horreur.

Le nouveau fantastique de Jean-Pierre Andrevon analyses the uncanny facets of the fantastic by Jean-Pierre Andrevon, a contemporary writer called “the French Stephen King” or “the French H.P. Lovecraft". Andrevon presents a new vision of the fantastic, deeply rooted in contemporary everyday life, seemingly monotonous and banal, in which both his characters and his readers evolve. Thus, the author reveals a different, harrowing side of the world familiar to the reader, as it turns into a powerful source of horror: natural catastrophes (mysterious pandemics, climate-related disasters, end of the Anthropocene), historical tragedies (wars, totalitarianism), social and psychological problems (madness, collective psychosis, loneliness). Another hallmark of Andrevonian fantastic is its dialogue with horror cinema.
Empowerment as a concept is making its impact on the field of literary studies. This volume shows its intricate relation to contemporary fiction in English, applying a broad range of approaches such as feminist, transcultural, and intersectional studies. Dealing with genres as diverse as dystopia, science fiction, TV adaptations, the historical novel, and immigrant fiction, this collection offers the first in-depth study of empowerment in literature. How, and to which end, do texts endow characters with power? In which ways can fiction become a tool of authorial self-empowerment? And which effects do such narratives have on readers? With this book, empowerment is put on the map of literary studies as a new, highly relevant critical concept stimulating fresh perspectives on contemporary fiction. Contributors: Sarah Dillon, Paul Hamann-Rose, Britta Maria Colligs, Peter Childs, Eva-Maria Windberger, David Malcolm, Ralf Hertel, Eleanor Ty, Diana Thiesen.
Reading the Palimpsest of the More-Than-Human World
Modern Ecopoetry: Reading the Palimpsest of the More-Than-Human World interrogates how humans’ relation to and confrontation with the nonhuman world is captured in or through poetry. It brings together contributions that explore how modern poetry addresses human beings’ relationship with the natural world, mirroring some of the most salient ecopoetic approaches to date. This collection is written from very different corners of the globe and significantly adds to the existing body of work because, on the one hand, it continues to focus on the greening of poetry and, on the other, it expands its critical implementation in poets not necessarily included in mainstream literary canons, by setting them side by side regardless of their cultural background.

Contributors: Aamir Aziz, Cristina M. Gámez-Fernández, Stephen Hock, Matilde Martín González, Leonor María Martínez Serrano, María Antonia Mezquita Fernández, Esther Sánchez-Pardo, Catherine Woodward, Heather H. Yeung, Rabia Zaheer
Author: Yair Neuman
The old practices of interpretation have been exhausted, and the humanities and social sciences are facing a crisis. Is there a way out of the labyrinth of reading? In this book, Professor Neuman presents a challenging approach to interpreting texts and reading literature through the spectacles of conceptual mathematics. This approach strives to avoid the simplicity of a quantitative approach to the analysis of literature as well as both the relativistic and the ideological dangers facing a qualitative reading of a text. The approach is introduced in a rigorous and accessible manner and woven with insights gained from various fields. Taking us on a challenging journey from Ovid’s Metamorphoses to Nick Cave’s The Death of Bunny Munro, the book shows how we may gain a deeper understanding of literature and the aesthetic experience of reading.
In Dialogue on Monarchy, Albert Sui-hung Lee applies Bakhtin’s dialogism to interpret the “unfinalized” dialogue on monarchical ideologies in the Gideon–Abimelech narrative. Lee associates a wide scope of Bakhtinian concepts with the dual images of the protagonists and the unique literary features of the dialogical narrative to illustrate the dialogue of genres as well as that of ideological voices, wherein the pro- and anti-monarchical voices constantly interact with each other. Studying archaeological evidence and literary examinations of prophetic books together, Lee explores the narrative redactor’s intention of engaging both remnant and deportee communities in an unfinalized dialogue of different forms of polity for the restoration of their unity and prosperity in exilic and post-exilic contexts.
Aktuelle Positionen der Vergleichenden Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaft
Exotisme et établissement français aux Îles (1625-1671)
Cette étude propose d’examiner les ramifications historiques de l’exotisme à partir d’une lecture critique de l’ Histoire générale des Antilles (1654/1667-71) écrite par le missionnaire dominicain, Jean-Baptiste Du Tertre. En procédant d’une analyse littéraire, notre étude suggère une reconfiguration de l’exotisme basée à la fois sur la théorisation contemporaine et sur le contexte historique et l’esthétique de l’époque. Notre travail se veut donc à la fois théorique en offrant une analyse critique des différentes orientations de l’exotisme ; et historique, en présentant une lecture approfondie d’une œuvre dont l’importance est considérable aussi bien pour l’histoire de la littérature française et antillaise que pour l’histoire de l’anthropologie. À cet égard, cette étude fournira aussi une exploration de la toute première colonisation française des îles et de la manière dont elle a été représentée.

This book examines the historical ramifications of the concept of exoticism through a literary analysis of Histoire générale des Antilles (1654/1667-71) written by Dominican missionary Jean-Baptiste Du Tertre. The study gives a thorough account of the early French colonization of the islands and the ways in which this violent process of cultural encounters was represented. It argues for the necessity to reconfigure the notion of exoticism, both by revisiting contemporary theorization and by contextualizing it in regard to the history and aesthetics of the times. The study is thus both theoretical, in proceeding by a critical reading of different orientations of exoticism, and historical in offering an in-depth study of an author and a period that have received little attention despite their impact on French Caribbean literature and on the history of anthropology.
Volume Editors: Yvonne Al-Taie and Marta Famula
Unverfügbares Verinnerlichen. Figuren der Einverleibung zwischen Eucharistie und Anthropophagie präsentiert in exemplarischen Studien vom Mittelalter bis zur Gegenwart die Literaturgeschichte der Einverleibung als kulturellen Ausdruck der Unverfügbarkeit. Die Figur der Einverleibung ist in der Literaturgeschichte von ubiquitärem Gebrauch bei der Verhandlung fundamentaler anthropologischer Erfahrungen wie Glaube, Begehren, Liebe, Sexualität, Macht, Trauma, aber auch der Möglichkeiten und Grenzen sprachlicher Mitteilbarkeit. Sie erscheint damit als eine Figur, die die kulturellen Herausforderungen auf der Schwelle zwischen dem Verfügbaren und dem Unverfügbaren offenlegt.

Unverfügbares Verinnerlichen. Figuren der Einverleibung zwischen Eucharistie und Anthropophagie offers a new approach to the literary history of incorporation as a cultural expression of contingency in exemplary readings from the Middle Ages to the Present. Incorporation is a figure used in literary history to deal with fundamental anthropological experiences such as believe, desire, love, sexuality, power, trauma, as well as the possibilities and limits of linguistic expression. It is thus proved a figure that reveals the cultural challenges situated at the threshold between control and the uncontrollable.
Yvonne Al-Taie, Michaela Bill-Mrziglod, Stephanie Blum, Kai Bremer, Margit Dahm-Kruse, Sina Dell’Anno, Marta Famula, Philippe P. Haensler, Stefanie Heine, Juliane Prade-Weiss, Christoph Schmitt-Maaß, Elias Zimmermann, Dominik Zink
Volume Editors: Kate Averis, Eglė Kačkutė, and Catherine Mao
Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French analyses the literary transgressions of women’s writing in French since the turn of the twenty-first century in the works of major figures, such as Annie Ernaux and Véronique Tadjo, of the now established writers of the ‘nouvelle génération’, such as Marie Darrieussecq and Virginie Despentes, and in some of the most exciting and innovative authors from across the francosphère, from Nine Antico to Maïssa Bey and Chloé Delaume.
Pushing the boundaries of current thinking about normative and queer identities, local and global communities, family and kinship structures, bodies and sexualities, creativity and the literary canon, these authors pose the potential of reading and writing to also effectuate change in the world beyond the text.

Transgression(s) in Twenty-First-Century Women's Writing in French étudie les transgressions littéraires dans l’écriture des femmes en français depuis le début du XXIe siècle. L’analyse porte sur les oeuvres de figures majeures, telles qu’Annie Ernaux et Véronique Tadjo, d’auteures bien établies de la ‘nouvelle génération’, parmi lesquelles Marie Darrieussecq et Virginie Despentes, et de certaines des auteures les plus innovantes de la francosphère, de Nine Antico à Maïssa Bey en passant par Chloé Delaume. Repoussant les frontières de la pensée dominante sur les identités normatives ou queer, les communautés locales ou globales, les structures familiales ou de parenté, les corps ou les sexualités, la créativité ou le canon littéraire, ces auteures développent un potentiel de lecture et d’écriture porteur de changements au-delà du texte. Contributors /avec des contributions de: Ounissa Ait Benali, Jean Anderson, Kate Averis, Marzia Caporale, Dawn M. Cornelio, Sandra Daroczi, Sophie Guignard, Élise Hugueny-Léger, Irène Le Roy Ladurie, Siobhán McIlvanney, Michèle A. Schaal, Marta Segarra, Marinella Termite, Lyn Thomas, Antonia Wimbush
Author: Anthony Glinoer

Abstract

Simultaneously an emblematic and ambiguous case of engaged literature, proletarian and revolutionary writings from 1920–1940 have been the focus of numerous studies: whether they be in Germany, France, the United States or Soviet Russia, the principal actors have been identified, certain works have been republished, and the ways in which these movements were first encouraged and then dismantled by the Communist International in the interest of the only accepted socialist realism have been demonstrated. However, the transnational and even global dimensions of this movement and the profound similarities among institutional processes carried out in different countries have been overlooked. Drawing on little-known critical sources from the Francophone world, this article reworks the terrain and presents the state of institutional sites of proletarian and revolutionary literature. To this end, small groups, magazines, and associations will be considered in order to shed new light on this era when, across the globe, workers turned into writers.

In: Journal of World Literature

Abstract

Scholarship on production of cultural goods highlights translation of literary works as a key mechanism of cultural circulation. This article rethinks circulation beyond translation. It argues that changes in aesthetic labels applied to cultural goods can prompt a scale shifting that favors the diffusion of these goods beyond their vernacular space of circulation. This article studies the transnational success of the label literatura latinoamericana, which from the 1960s onward gained acceptance in Spanish, English, French, and other languages as the label that best captured the region’s literary uniqueness. This change in aesthetic labeling made it possible for literatura latinoamericana to enter world literature and for literary works such as One Hundred Years of Solitude to circulate at an unprecedented scale, as international bestsellers and classics. The article finds that aesthetic labeling – a “cultural kind” in the arts – is a far-reaching and understudied mechanism in cultural production and circulation.

In: Journal of World Literature
Author: Wiebke Sievers

Abstract

Literary actors in Western countries have long ignored authors who came as immigrants or are members of ethnic minorities. This article discusses the upscaling of these authors in the West since the 1960s as an international process related to other processes of globalisation, namely the recognition of non-Western writers and the emergence of transnational literary fields. Moreover, it compares the effects of this process in the British and German literary fields. In Britain, the upscaling of immigrants is intertwined with the recognition of post-colonial writing in English worldwide as well as with the emergence of a transnational literary field in English. In Germany, by contrast, there were no direct links between the growing recognition of peripheralized authors, the growing connectivity between several literary fields operating in German, and the upscaling of immigrants. This explains why it took immigrants so much longer to gain recognition in Germany than it did in Britain.

In: Journal of World Literature

Abstract

Using the case of Algeria, this article shows that the national and the international—also nationalization and internationalization—in peripheral literary fields do not happen in opposition to each other but are two sides of the same coin. I argue that we should think of this as a transnational literary field. Even though they compete with one another, writers within these fields are always connected. Furthermore, the characteristics of the two poles, in terms of their relative autonomy from political and economic constraints, are not as systematically opposed to one another as Pascale Casanova suggests. Nationalization and internationalization are also frequently intertwined: the material internationalization of texts and writers can reinforce the symbolic nationalization of a literature (e.g. its identification in the international world as “Algerian literature”). Recognizing this also calls into question assertions by scholars such as Homi Bhabha who assert that internationalization of literature goes hand in hand with its hybridization.

In: Journal of World Literature

Abstract

We generally believe that literature first circulates nationally and then scales up through translation and reception at an international level. In contrast, I argue that Taiwan literature first attained international acclaim through intermedial translation during the New Cinema period (1982–90) and was only then subsequently recognized nationally. These intermedial translations included not only adaptations of literature for film, but also collaborations between authors who acted as screenwriters and filmmakers. The films resulting from these collaborations repositioned Taiwan as a multilingual, multicultural and democratic nation. These shifts in media facilitated the circulation of these new narratives. Filmmakers could circumvent censorship at home and reach international audiences at Western film festivals. The international success ensured the wide circulation of these narratives in Taiwan.

In: Journal of World Literature
Author: Markus Arnold

Abstract

Contemporary literature from Mauritius, a heterogeneous multilingual production, is entangled within a complex transnational topology, where several increasingly recognized authors have deployed multiple identities through personal and editorial mobility. They benefit from (and participate in) the diversification of publishing structures, instances of dissemination, and audiences, while others hold very little symbolic capital. This paper discusses several key issues to understand the island’s multifaceted and unequal literary microcosm. It traces certain historical, linguistic and cultural predispositions of the Mauritian text today, addresses the reasons and implications of literary scale-shifting beyond the local, examines the modalities of trans/international recognition, and raises the issues at stake when translating these works. The island is hereby considered as a paradigmatic example of an emerging literary space on the postcolonial “periphery”, both contributing to challenging established canons, while remaining tributary to persisting hierarchies in the global literary system.

In: Journal of World Literature

Abstract

This special issue on scale shifting brings into sharper focus the complexity of global literary circulation, especially when viewed from the perspective of global literary peripheries. In this introduction, we present the idea of scale shifting, a concept we use to move beyond translation to include circulation in global languages, such as English and French. We build on earlier analyses that mapped previous literary worlds and shed light on the aesthetic and sociological factors that enabled outsiders to enter them by (1) focusing on how peripheralised writers scale up to gain global recognition in multiscalar literary fields and (2) analysing how, in turn, this scale shifting changes the national, regional and global levels of these fields. In addition, we provide a preview of each article included in this volume and summarise the collective takeaways gleaned from our individual case studies.

In: Journal of World Literature
In: Journal of World Literature
Author: Gisèle Sapiro

Abstract

Various external and internal factors shape and condition the literary field: education, the book market, the nation state, political movements, international organizations (like UNESCO), and specific authorities such as prizes. These factors are examined in this article at different spatial scales: “international,” “transnational,” “global,” “world,” “cosmopolitan,” which are defined in the first section of the article in order to identify the agents that participate in the formation and functioning of the literary field at these different levels, and thus enable us to better understand the mechanisms of scale-shifting. Three periods are then examined: the era of “inter-nationalism,” running from the end of the nineteenth century to the Second World War, the period of “developmental” policy, during which the borders of the transnational literary field were extended beyond the Western world, and the era of “globalization.”

In: Journal of World Literature