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Zur Kritik materialistischer Bildungstheorie und -praxis
Author: Roger Behrens
Die Debatten über Bildung und Erziehung sowie deren Sinn und Zweck haben Konjunktur. Obwohl unter einem allgemeinen Vorzeichen der Kritik stehend, spielt eine materialistische Bildungstheorie und -praxis in diesen Debatten keine Rolle mehr.
Noch in den 1970er Jahren gingen von der kritischen Theorie der Bildung, Erziehung und Pädagogik entscheidende Impulse aus; mit kritischen Konzepten wie »materialistische Bildungstheorie« oder »dialektische Pädagogik« konnte das humanistische Bildungsideal auch praktisch aktualisiert werden (antiautoritäre Erziehung, Kinderladenbewegung, freie Schulen etc.). Allerdings sind solche gesellschaftlichen Interventionen heute restlos integriert, die kritischen Motive weitgehend absorbiert, entschärft oder schlechterdings vergessen. Eingebettet in eine kritische Begriffs- und Gesellschaftsanalyse rekonstruiert die Studie historisch und systematisch dieses »Scheitern«, beleuchtet aber auch das »Machbare« einer materialistischen Bildungstheorie und -praxis.
Author: D. G. Mulcahy
Gen Ed locates serious discussion of general education in the context of some of the day-to-day realities encountered in putting it into practice and promoting efforts at reform at Metropolitan Atlantic University (aka the Metro). This dual focus is found in the often-pugnacious policy debate among the faculty and a more light-hearted discussion of related questions carried on by Professor Kelly as he models Socratic teaching in his upper-level class for prospective teachers. Reforming general education at the Metro is not free of the vanities and vulgarities of ambitious men and women and self-serving politicians, of course, nor those who poke fun at them. Arnie Smatter, the irrepressible and nosey chat show host of Radio YOY ensures that this does not go unnoticed.

The overall humorous tone of Gen Ed does not detract from Mulcahy’s thoughtful treatment of substantive issues that will be of interest to serious scholars, students, and a general readership. It is the behaviour of those involved, the broader media and political contexts in which events take place, which mainly becomes the object of humorous treatment.
A Guidebook of Practices, Claims, Issues, and Implications
In this volume, the author offers an exploratory analysis of the history of homeschooling in the United States, current curricular practices, religious and political rationales for homeschooling, a critique of the claims by homeschooling advocates that the practice leads to greater efficiency and effectiveness, and what homeschooling and individualistic-oriented approaches mean for society.

Teaching the next generation at home is, with little doubt, the oldest form of educating children. Yet, this simplistic understanding of “homeschooling” does not adequately capture the growth of homeschooling as a practice in the 21st century nor is it a widely accessible form of “school choice” for most families. While many parents keep their children out of formal schooling – public and private – for myriad reasons, what is clear is that homeschooling is the epitome of a conceiving of education as an individualistic good – a commodity – that can, or should, be done outside of a conception of the common good, a reasonable understanding of teaching as a profession, and the elevation of ideological echo chambers of information which can have deleterious impacts on the students who are homeschooled and society, broadly.
Policy and Practice in Multilingual Education Based on Non-Dominant Languages
This second volume of Language Issues in Comparative Education, following the tradition of the first, introduces the state of the field, re-establishes core terminology and concepts, and situates the chapters in terms of their contributions to multilingual education based on non-dominant languages. The first group of chapters examines language-in-education policy change, applying an innovative framework to analyze diverse contexts including Mozambique, Estonia and the Philippines. The next group of chapters describes activities designed to implement multilingual education. Using examples from Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya and Nepal, they explore progress in teacher professional development and elaboration of materials for literacy and learning through non-dominant languages. Some highlight new areas of the field, attending to speakers of non-dominant languages other than the ones chosen for instruction, and to the urgent multilingual needs of refugee learners. The final group of chapters presents strategies for research and advocacy, illustrated with examples from DR Congo, Uganda and India. Taken together, these contributions form a cohesive body of work that takes stock of advances in multilingual education and moves the field forward.

The authors and editors share a common commitment to comparativism in their methods and analysis, and aim to contribute to a more inclusive and multilingual education for all.
Jean-François Lyotard, Pedagogy, Thought
Author: Derek R. Ford
In the first monograph on Lyotard and education, Derek R. Ford approaches Lyotard’s thought as pedagogical in itself. The result is a novel, soft, and accessible study of Lyotard organized around two inhuman educations: that of “the system” and that of “the human.” The former enforces an interminable process of development, dialogue and exchange, while the latter finds its force in the mute, secret, opaque, and inarticulable.

Threading together a range of Lyotard’s work through four pedagogical processes—reading, writing, voicing, and listening—the author insists on the distinct educational logics that can uphold or interrupt different ways of being-together in the world, touching on a range of topics from literacy and aesthetics to time and political-economy. While Inhuman Educations can serve as an introduction to Lyotard’s philosophy, it also constitutes a singular, provocative, and fresh take on his thought.
Volume Editors: Nasser Mansour and Heba EL-Deghaidy
This book presents an international perspective of the influence of cultural issues on STEM reform. Effective STEM education is of considerable importance internationally because there is increase pressure by governments to produce technically skilled people from the compulsory education sectors; people capable of participating actively in the so-called’ knowledge economy’ or knowledge society. An important and distinguishing feature of the book is that it draws upon the empirical experiences and research of the local experts from an extremely diverse cohort across the world.

Contributors are: Nayif Awad, David Barlex, Alexandra Bazdar, Saouma BouJaoude, Heba EL-Deghaidy, Marwa Eltanahy, Sibel Erduran, Sufian Forawi, Clare Gartland, Lilia Halim, Ying-Shao Hsu, Zanaton Haji Iksan, Deena Khalil, Meredith Kier, Nasser Mansour, Mohamad Sattar Rasul, Seema Rivera, Dalene Swanson, Paige Teamey, Tuan Mastura Tuan Soh, Russell Tytler, Noël Williams and Yi-Fen Yeh.
International cooperation in higher education is not new, but gained new urgency in recent years with the expansion of the knowledge economy, the easy flow of communications and the emulation created by international rankings. In the European Union’s countries, international competition and the process of political and economic unification required national higher education institutions to give priority to international cooperation, while large countries such as Russia, China, Brazil and South Africa intensified their effort to modernise their institutions and link them to the international flow of science, technology and talent, leading similar trends in other countries in their regions. These global trends are shaped by the national culture and institutions of each country, and the existing national and international cooperation policies and instruments on all sides. In Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU: Challenges and Opportunities from Four Continents, the authors look at how these interactions occur from the perspectives of the European Union and the countries involved and make recommendations on policies that could make international cooperation more fluid and beneficial to all parties involved.
Editor: Ali A. Abdi
With the limited availability of related foci in the area of critical educational studies, Critical Theorizations of Education is timely in both its topical relevance and time-space-themed discursive interventions. With its overall scope, constructed as both a counter-and-forward looking critical reflections and analysis of some of the most salient and contemporaneously active platforms of education, it prospectively and relatively comprehensively expands on dynamically intersecting learning and teaching contexts and relationships. As such, the volume’s contents by both established and emerging scholars, selectively locate the interplays of knowledge, learning and attendant power relations, which either transform or reproduce the status quo.

Contributors are: Levonne Abshire, Claire Alkouatli, David Anderson, Neda Asadi, N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba, Gulbahar Beckett, José Cossa, Ratna Ghosh, Shibao Guo, Yan Guo, Carl E. James, Dip Kapoor, Festus Kelonye Beru, Ginette Lafreniere, Qing Li, Oliver Masakure, Magnus Mfoafo-M'Carthy, Greg William Misiaszek, Dolana Mogadime, Samson Nashon, Selline Ooko, Bathseba Opini, Amy Parent, Thashika Pillay, Edward Shizha, Kimberley Tavares, Alison Taylor, and Stacey Wilson-Forsberg.
How can African philosophy of education contribute to contemporary debates in the context of complexities, dilemmas and uncertainties in African higher education? The capacity for self-reflection, self-evaluation and self-criticism enables African philosophy of higher education to examine and re-examine itself in the context of current issues in African higher education. The reflective capacity is in line with the Socratic dictum ‘know thy self.’ African Higher Education in the 21st Century: Epistemological, Ontological and Ethical Perspectives responds to the demands for reflection and self-knowledge by drawing from ontology, epistemology and ethics in an attempt to address issues that affect African higher education as they connect with the past, present and future.
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, and women. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Lamesha C. Brown, LaToya Brown, Altheria Caldera, Araceli Calderón, Marisa V. Cervantes, Joy Cobb, Raven K. Cokley, Francine R. Coston, Angela Gay, Josué R. López, Rebecca Morgan, Gloria A. Negrete-Lopez, Lisa S. Palacios, Takeshia Pierre, Alejandra I. Ramírez, Matt Reid, Ebony Russ, Jaye Sablan, Travis Smith, Phitsamay S. Uy, Jane A. Van Galen, Jason K. Wallace and Lin Wu.
First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Academic Careers
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power in Early Careers overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school and then become faculty, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, women, or people with disabilities. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to a research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Veronica R. Barrios, Candis Bond, Beth Buyserie, Noralis Rodríguez Coss, Charise Paulette DeBerry, Janette Diaz, Alfred P. Flores, José García, Cynthia George, Shonda Goward, Luis Javier Pentón Herrera, Nataria T. Joseph, Castagna Lacet, Jennifer M. Longley, Catherine Ma, Esther Díaz Martín, Nadia Yolanda Alverez Mexia, T. Mark Montoya, Miranda Mosier, Michelle Parrinello-Cason, J. Michael Ryan, Adrián Arroyo Pérez, Will Porter, Jaye Sablan, Theresa Stewart-Ambo, Keisha Thompson, Ethan Trinh, Jane A. Van Galen and Wendy Champagnie Williams.