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Stephen G. Parker, Jenny Berglund, David Lewin and Deirdre Raftery

Abstract

This publication makes the case for ‘religion and education’ as a distinct, but cross-disciplinary, field of inquiry. To begin with, consideration is given to the changing dynamic between ‘religion and education’ historically, and the differing understandings of religious education within it. Next, ‘religion and education’ is examined from methodologically specific perspectives, namely the philosophical, historical and sociological. The authors outline the particular insights to be gleaned about ‘religion and education’ on the basis of their commitment to these methodological standpoints. Overall, this publication is concerned with demonstrating the scope of the field, and the importance of having a range of disciplinary, and interdisciplinary, perspectives informing it.

Equity in and through Education

Changing Contexts, Consequences and Contestations

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Edited by Stephen Carney and Michele Schweisfurth

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time. Second Edition

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Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace is a story of a lost world, a story in history of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in Ukraine before WWI. As cultural study, the narrative draws upon the oral stories of the author’s father, family letters, eyewitness accounts, immigration papers, etc., and cultural research. The narrative becomes a transformative space to re-present story as performance, a meta-narrative, and an auto-ethnography for the author to reflect upon the effects of the stories on her own life, as daughter of a survivor, and as teacher/scholar. Summerfield raises questions about immigration, survival, resilience, place and identity, how story functions as antidote to trauma, a means of making sense of the world, and as resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence we know the past and remember those who came before. In 2011, she found her way back to the place her family came from in Ukraine. The book is now being read by students in their ESL classes in Novokoonstantinov, Ukraine.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time

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Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace: Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time is a cultural study of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in southwestern Ukraine before World War I to their international lives in the 21st century. The narrative, told from multiple perspectives, becomes a transformative space for re-presenting family stories as cultural performance. The study draws from many sources: ethnographic interviews with an oral storyteller (the author’s father), family letters, papers from immigration and relief organizations of the 1920s, eyewitness reports, newspaper clippings, photographs, maps, genealogy, and cultural, historical, and literary research.
The book investigates the ways family stories can be collected, interpreted, and re-presented to situate story in history and to re-envision connections between the past, present, and future. Family stories become memory sites for interrogating questions of loss and displacement, exile, immigration, survival, resilience, and identity. Stories function as antidotes to trauma, a means of making sense of the world. Memory is an act of resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence that we know the past and remember those who came before.

Understanding Israel/Palestine

Race, Nation, and Human Rights in the Conflict

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Eve Spangler

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the longest, ongoing hot-and-cold war of the 20th and 21st centuries. It has produced more refugees than any current conflict, generating fully one quarter of all refugees worldwide. Everyone knows that the Palestinian-Israeli conflict is important itself, and is also fueling tensions throughout the Middle East. Yet most people shy away from this conflict, claiming it is “just too complicated” to understand.
This book is written for people who want a point of entry into the conversation. It offers both a historic and analytic framework. Readers, whether acting as students, parishioners, neighbors, voters, or dinner guests will find in these pages an analysis of the most commonly heard Israeli positions, and a succinct account of the Palestinian voices we seldom hear. The author argues that human rights standards have never been used as the basis on which the Israeli-Palestinian conflict should be resolved and that only these standards can produce a just and sustainable resolution.
This book will be useful for classes in Middle East studies, peace and conflict studies, Middle East history, sociology of race, and political science. It can be helpful for church groups, labor groups, or other grass roots organizations committed to social justice, and for all readers who wish to be informed about this important topic.
Here is a Youtube interview where Professor Spangler discusses the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19L_K_mFFmg

Adaptation

Customizing Pedagogy for Non-Western Learners

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M.J Dahl

Background and Context

Historical Roots of Education in the United Arab Emirates

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M.J Dahl

Failure to Thrive in Constructivism

A Cross-Cultural Malady

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Marilyn Dahl

Western educators constantly look for ways to make the process of learning more meaningful, to kindle the spark that initiates a lifelong pursuit of knowledge and creative innovation. Recent theories have favored the development of critical learning skills over the acquisition of facts. However, these theories are rooted in Western democratic and egalitarian assumptions, some of which exist in no other culture on earth. Although it seems logical that any learner, set at liberty to explore the world, would naturally develop the ability to think critically and analytically, it is important to point out that Western logic is not universal, and what seems natural is, in fact, a product of the Western independence-oriented worldview.
This book examines the consequences of taking a full-blown constructivist approach into Arabic tertiary education, and uncovers some interesting hidden factors that prevent cognitive progress in this environment. This seemingly natural approach to learning does not, in fact, come naturally, but requires careful preparation to enable learners to accept cognitive experiences that may be culturally uncomfortable.

Towards Constructivism

The Introduction of Constructivist Pedagogy to Emirati Learners

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M.J Dahl

Addressing Liberalism

Critical Race Theory as Dialogic Performance

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Benjamin Blaisdell

The Age of Ressentiment

Bodies Without Souls

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William Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

An Analysis of MC KRS-One and his Lyrics

The Curriculum of Power and Privilege in Rap Music

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Priya Parmar

Appendix A

A Discography of Boogie Down Productions & KRS-One

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Priya Parmar

Appendix C

Hiphop’s Declaration of Peace

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Priya Parmar

Being a Muslimah and a Headteacher

Insights from a Life Story Approach towards Accessing Leadership

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Imran Mogra

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William Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

Margarida César and Kristiina Kumpulainen

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Özlem Sensoy and Christopher Darius Stonebanks

The Boys

Performing Antiracist Narratives

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Benjamin Blaisdell

Building Bridges from Broken Bones

Traditional Bonesetters and Health Choices in Northern Ghana

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Coleman Agyeyomah and Jonathan Langdon

Catching that Hierarchical Feeling – A Chill Running Up and Down My Spine!

In Search of the In-Between Terrain of Theorizing Hegemony

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Lee Elliott Fleischer

Christocrats and the Civic Gospel

The Backlash of the Culture Wars

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William Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

Diversity Facilitation

Tips for the Novice Trainer

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Brian C. Johnson

Educating Moods

Regression, Repetition Compulsion and Minimalism

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Marla Morris

The Civic Gospel

A Political Cartography of Christianity

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William M. Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

This book is a result of the times in which we are living. These times demand a response. When the authors began to write this book, it was not popular to dissent against the Bush administration. In fact, dissent was and still is equated with terrorism. Now, it might seem that the tide is turning and maybe after the 2008 election some of this nightmare we have been experiencing will change. At least that is the optimistic view. But there are small traces that the struggle the authors discuss in this book will continue well into the 21st century.
The intermingling of the political and the religious is still swirling in the present context. The Civic Gospel, as the authors discuss it, is the notion that preaching the Gospel is preaching politics and vise versa. This book is about that struggle and the issues related to it.

Counter-Hegemonic Teaching

Counter-Hegemonic Perspectives for Teaching Social Studies, the Foundations, Special Education Inclusion, and Multiculturalism

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Lee Elliot Fleischer

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Edited by Jonathan Langdon

Indigenous knowledges are the subject of much discussion and debate in many contemporary academic fields. This is no less true in the fields of education and development studies—two fields with long histories of interaction with indigenous knowledges and peoples. Yet, despite this similar level of interest and interaction, there has yet to emerge a book that draws together the two fields as they interact with and learn from indigenous epistemologies. This then is the starting point of this book. Drawing together a selection of authors whose work speaks to the interconnection of the three areas of knowledge, the chapters examine how these knowledges co-exist in a number of specific sites. The collection includes: a decolonizing critique of the fields and practice of development and education; a discussion of indigenous knowledge as a source of learning for the teaching of development studies; an examination of the use of local/traditional/indigenous knowledges in sustainable livelihoods projects; a reflection on building collaboration towards the emergence of an indigenous research methodology; a thinking-through of the linkages between language, development and education in an indigenous Canadian community; a personalized account of the impact of indigenous knowledges on the formation of a young medical student; and, a reflection on dialogue between western health practitioners and traditional bonesetters in northern Ghana. With each of these contributions the book aims not to define the terrain, and thereby limit the rich debate around each of the terms in the book’s title, but rather to allow for an interplay of ideas. Ultimately, the book is an attempt to provide varied examples of how different epistemologies can inform each other and contribute to knowledge production that reflects diverse ways of knowing about Indigenous knowledges, development and education.

Knowledge Reigns Supreme

The Critical Pedagogy of Hip-Hop Artist KRS-ONE

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Priya Parmar

Knowledge Reigns Supreme: The Critical Pedagogy of Hip-hop Artist KRS-ONE argues for the inclusionary practice of studying and interpreting postmodern texts in today’s school curriculum using a (Hip-hop) cultural studies and critical theory approach, thus creating a transformative curriculum. Based on the work of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire, the text argues that the implementation of teaching strategies and techniques derived from Hip-hop culture and specifically the rap lyrics of legendary Hip-hop pioneer and activist, Lawrence Parker, aka KRS-ONE (Knowledge Reigns Supreme Over Nearly Everyone) is an empowering, liberating pedagogy for educators, prospective educators and students of diverse backgrounds. The purpose of Knowedge Reigns Supreme … is to analyze and critique KRS-ONE’s rap lyrics as a postmodern text and as one concrete example of critical literacy, particularly because of the emancipatory potential it has for educating all youth, regardless of race, class or ethnicity. KRS-ONE’s lyrical career began in 1986 and continues today with the inclusion of lecture tours and performances at universities nationally and internationally. He is one of the most sought after collegiate speakers in the country, visiting over 200 universities, including: Clark, Yale, Moorehouse, Columbia, Harvard, Princeton, Temple, Howard, Spellman, and UCLA. Knowledge Reigns Supreme … also provides educators with pedagogical strategies that can be implemented in the classroom. Educators teaching courses in pedagogy, language arts, social studies, research and methodology at the high school (9-12), undergraduate and graduate levels will find the contents of this text useful.

Muslim Voices in School

Narratives of Identity and Pluralism

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Edited by Özlem Sensoy and Christopher Darius Stonebanks

This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West.
The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.
This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.
WINNER! of the National Association for Multicultural Education’s 2010 Philip C. Chinn book award!

On not being Able to Play

Scholars, Musicians and the Crisis of the Psyche

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Marla Morris

Scholars and musicians from many different backgrounds will find this book helpful as it deals with psychic problems in both professions. This book might help scholars and musicians to find a way out of their psychic dilemmas. From classical musicians to rock stars, from curriculum theorists to music teachers, from anthropologists to philosophers, this book takes the reader through a rocky intellectual terrain to explore what happens when one can no longer play or work. The driving question of the book is this: What do you do when you cannot do what you were called to do? This is what the author calls The Crisis of Psyche. The theoretical framework for this book combines curriculum theory, psychoanalysis and phenomenology. Here, the author looks at issues of emotion and the working through of crisis points in the lives of both scholars and musicians. Psychoanalytic theory helps to flesh out and untangle what it means to suffer from a damaged musical psyche and a damaged scholarly psyche. How to work through psychic inertia as a scholar? How to work through through psychic inertia as a musician? From Pink Floyd to Laurie Anderson, from Marion Milner to William F. Pinar, this book draws on the work of a wide range of musicians and scholars to find a way out of psychic blocks. From Philip Glass to Pablo Casals, from Michael Eigen to Mary Aswell Doll, this book draws on the work of composers, cellists, psychoanalysts and educationists to find a way out of psychic meltdowns.

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Shirley Wade McLoughlin

With the increasingly techno-rational approach to education causing a sense of hopelessness among educators in both public schools and higher education institutions, alternative pedagogical approaches are needed to provide educators with the means to navigate through oppressive milieus. The author offers her conceptualization of a pedagogy of the blues as such an approach. This work is grounded in the powerful early blues of African Americans, identifying specific themes representative of the blues metaphor that reverberate in the work of early blues artists. Using a predominantly cultural studies lens, the author traces the emergence and evolution of the blues metaphor from pre-slavery Africa’s musical forms to the music of the slaves. She then closely examines the emergence of the blues as a form of popular music in the 1920s. analyzing popular culture representations of the blues artists, historical artifacts, recordings, lyrics of early blues, and other sources of data. From this material, certain themes emerge and are identified as part of the blues metaphor. These themes and their evolution are traced through other forms of popular music, including jazz, country, rhythm and blues, rock, folk, and rap. The author then uses these powerful themes to mold a conceptualization of a pedagogy of the blues, a pedagogical approach that allows educators to hope, to resist, and to transcend the oppressive environments that exist in today’s educational settings.

Seeing With Poetic Eyes

Critical Race Theory and Moving from Liberal to Critical Forms of Race Research in Sociology of Education

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Benjamin Blaisdell

“Seeing with poetic eyes” is a phrase used by a teacher to describe one of his students, a teenager who could recognize the disconnect between U. S. society’s claims about racial equity and its actual commitment towards that equity. As a teacher, he saw it as his mission to help all of his students see the world in such a critical way with that hope that they would be motivated to pursue antiracism more actively in their lives. In this book, I discuss how critical race theory (CRT) can motivate research on race in sociology of education in a similar way. Specifically, I describe how CRT helped me work with seven white teachers on developing more critical understandings of race. In my ethnographic interviews with these teachers, the analytical tools of CRT gave me a way to openly dialogue with them about issues of race in education. I was able to not only learn from the teachers but also work with them on developing racial awareness. Instead of relying on more liberal forms of sociological research—where the researcher extracts data from participants—CRT helped me promote a more critical approach, one where the researcher and participants work together to actively pursue antiracism in the research act itself. So “seeing with poetic eyes” refers the way that I have come to view research as a means of antiracism. Similarly, I propose that CRT can promote such a critical approach to research on race in the field of sociology of education.

Edited by Margarida César and Kristiina Kumpulainen

Multicultural issues are part of the agenda for researchers, academics, and politicians. The new technologies have brought multiculturality into our professional and personal lives, opening new possibilities for social interactions among people from different countries, cultures, ages, and gender. Being able to deal with diversity, including other cultures, is a must in the 21st century.
This book is an opportunity to read narratives about social interactions in multicultural settings, and to discuss the role they play in the construction of school and social achievement. It is not only a book on multiculturality. It is also a multicultural book, including an introduction and 13 chapters from authors representing 11 countries, and many more cultures. It is a journey that brings you through different settings, situations and scenarios, describing them vividly, so that the reader can have an authentic taste of them.
This is a book that researchers, academics, teachers, policy makers, and politicians should read. It illuminates many of the problems related to multiculturality. But it also reports on educational experiences and forms of interacting that help solving these problems. It also illustrates the barriers that still exist and that keep many persons apart from equity.
Moreover, due to its narrative mood - the descriptions of what happens in different educational systems, and episodes that could happen to us all, including our kids - this is a book for parents, youngsters, and all the ones interested in knowing other cultures. After all, education is an issue that is related to each human being. We are all cultural individuals, who need to interact with each other. Thus, this is a book to learn how social interactions, in such a demanding multicultural world, can help us live in peace and understand each other.

A Soul has no Gender

Love and acceptance through the eyes of a mother of sexual and gender minority children

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Denise M. Ajeto

What would you do if your child told you that he or she had something “very difficult” to tell you? How would you respond? Would you sit down and try to understand what your child was trying to communicate to you? Would you respond in anger, judgment, or irritation? Would you even give your child your full attention? And after listening to your child, would you attempt to ignore, dismiss, or even deny what your child was trying to tell you?
These are important questions for all parents to ask—and answer—because it is vitally important that parents understand how to respond to the significant questions that our children present to us with care and consideration. This understanding is especially critical for parents who are faced with the additional—and unexpected—challenge of how to respond when what is so “very difficult” for their child to tell them is that he or she is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning their identity (LGBTQ).
Given the strong societal stigma against the LGBTQ population, as well as the lack of education with respect to parenting skills, sexuality, gender, and identity development, many parents feel overwhelmed, ashamed, and isolated. As a result, despite coming out in increasing numbers, almost half of LGBTQ youth face an uncertain future due to parental and societal rejection.
A Soul Has No Gender is the story of one mother’s inquiry into her experience of coming to accept the sexual and gender identities of her fraternal twins, who are lesbian and female-to-male transgender, and how the experience transformed not only her relationships with her children, but with herself as well.

We've Scene it All Before

Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training

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Brian C. Johnson

A revolutionary tool for corporate and academic trainers, We’ve Scene It All Before harnesses the power of mainstream Hollywood film to enhance educational sessions about diversity and social justice. This resource manual offers practical guidance on how to effectively use the concept of difference as a starting point towards true inclusion.
Seasoned and novice trainers will appreciate the suggested strategies and best practices on facilitating diversity dialogues, which are coupled with a set of twenty-five definitions that introduce and raise awareness of the personal and systemic nature of difference, discrimination, and power. Workshops on human relations and workplace diversity must move beyond the superficial “celebration” of diversity to the dismantling of systems of privilege and oppression that create environments where members of the organization are disenfranchised and disempowered.
Using clips from a variety of genres of mainstream film allows the trainer to make intercultural concepts visible and offers a way for us to challenge our own values and assumptions. Participants will enjoy the presentations more as they view some of their favorite films in a whole new way; using this familiar medium creates a common basis for entering the discussions all the while giving us the permission to talk about serious and often controversial subjects.
We’ve Scene It All Before: Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training is a learning tool which will be tremendously useful in reducing resistance and increasing thoughtful cross-cultural dialogue.

An Equal Opportunity Pusher

Using Critical Race Theory to Deepen Racial Awareness

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Benjamin Blaisdell

From Research to Practice

What the Study of Multiethnic Classrooms Has to Offer

Mariëtte de Haan and Ed Elbers

Indigenous Knowledges, Sustainable Development and the Environment

Implications for Research, Education and Capacity Building

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Blane Harvey

Indigenous Research and Decolonizing Methodologies: Possibilities & Opportunities

In the words of Eddie Cook, “It doesn’t have to be this way, it could be otherwise”.

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Christine Stocek and Rodney Mark

Integrating Identities

Muslim American Youth Confronting Challenges and Creating Change

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Shaza Khan

Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont

The Land of a Thousand Churches

The Ex-Confederacy and the Resurrection of the South

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William Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

Left to my own Devices

Hybrid Identity Development of Religion and Sexual Orientation Among Muslim Students in the United States

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Younes Mourchid

Listening

The Regressive Movement of Currere

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Marla Morris

Moving Heart

The Pedagogical Potential of Critical Race Theory

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Benjamin Blaisdell

Moving Targets

Racism and Responsibility

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Benjamin Blaisdell

The Mystery of Music

A Psychoanalytic Exploration

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Marla Morris

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William Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

On Being Black and Muslim

Eclipsed Identities in the Classroom

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Samaa Abdurraqib

On Being Us and Them

A Voice from the Edge

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Carolyne Ali Khan

On Not Being Able to Heal

Dread and Nachtraglichkeit

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Marla Morris

On Waiting

States of Interiority and Intentionality

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Marla Morris

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William Reynolds and Julie A. Webber

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Özlem Sensoy and Christopher Darius Stonebanks