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This selected translation of Blue Book of Chinese Education 2016 reviews China’s education development in 2015. Chapter one offers an overview. Chapters two to four examine rural education in China, including the education of the left-behind children, compulsory education in rural areas, and the working condition of rural teachers. Chapters five to eleven cover educational services, education reform, non-governmental education, training program for teachers, teaching of traditional Chinese culture, the basic values of high-school students, and school bullying. The last three chapters are survey reports of compulsory education development in Chinese cities, math and science education for ethnic minority populations, and education authorities’ attitudes toward reform. The seven appendices provide important supplementary materials.
A Guidebook of Practices, Claims, Issues, and Implications
In this volume, the author offers an exploratory analysis of the history of homeschooling in the United States, current curricular practices, religious and political rationales for homeschooling, a critique of the claims by homeschooling advocates that the practice leads to greater efficiency and effectiveness, and what homeschooling and individualistic-oriented approaches mean for society.

Teaching the next generation at home is, with little doubt, the oldest form of educating children. Yet, this simplistic understanding of “homeschooling” does not adequately capture the growth of homeschooling as a practice in the 21st century nor is it a widely accessible form of “school choice” for most families. While many parents keep their children out of formal schooling – public and private – for myriad reasons, what is clear is that homeschooling is the epitome of a conceiving of education as an individualistic good – a commodity – that can, or should, be done outside of a conception of the common good, a reasonable understanding of teaching as a profession, and the elevation of ideological echo chambers of information which can have deleterious impacts on the students who are homeschooled and society, broadly.
Volume Editors: Kenneth Tobin and Konstantinos Alexakos
Doing Authentic Inquiry to Improve Learning and Teaching consists of 18 chapters, and 19 authors from 4 countries. The book is suited for use by educators, researchers and classroom practitioners involved in teaching and learning, teacher education, and policy. All chapters are grounded in urban contexts, but are broadly applicable. Multilogical research highlights uses of sociocultural theory, authentic, event-oriented, interpretive inquiry, narrative, and willingness to learn from difference. Methodologies are historically constituted, emergent, contingent, and participatory, embracing collaborative, and contemplative practices, and value of many voices and diverse meaning systems. Readers experience research that is potentially both personally and professionally transformative and applicable to today’s challenges.

Contributors are: Jennifer D. Adams, Konstantinos Alexakos, Arnau Amat, Marissa E. Bellino, Mitch Bleier, Corinna Yolanda Brathwaite, Olga Calderon, Katelin Corbett, Amy DeFelice, Gene Fellner, Helen Kwah, Manny Lopez, Anna Malyukova, Kate E. O'Hara, Malgorzata Powietrzyńska, Isabel Sellas, Kenneth Tobin, and Yau Yan Wong.
Lessons Learned from Reading the Signs
Semiotics has explained the cognitive mechanisms of a complex, subtle and important phenomenon affecting all human interactions and communications across socio-cultural, socio-economic groups. Semiotics has captured a durable and enriching functionality from multiple disciplines including psychology, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, marketing and their multidisciplinary off-spring, such as, educational psychology, consumer psychology, visual literacy, media studies, etc. Semiotic treatises have explored critical factors affecting the relationship between any intended message and the message recipient’s interpretation. The factors that shape interpretation inherently affect learning and often directly affect learner engagement with the content. Learning environments have been culturally-laden communication experiences which academics, largely segmented by discipline, have described but often cloaked in semiotic jargon.

Each chapter integrates example after example of semiotics in everyday activities and events, such as stories, graphics, movies, games, infographics, and educational strategies. The chapters also present the most salient semiotic features for learning environments. The book describes semiotics as a communications phenomenon with practical implications for educators to enhance courses and programs with semiotic features in any educational environment but especially in mediated e-learning environments.
A Case of Social Justice
Author: R. P. Clair
Blood into Water: A Case of Social Justice is a novel that weaves together the past and the present, from Mayan legends to contemporary stories of corporate greed. The story follows a mother and son, Sofía and Miguel Rodríguez, as they team with reporter Caleb Barthes to uncover a corporate scheme of exploitation. Barthes is sent to Nicaragua on an investigative assignment to look into water privatization plans. He learns far more than he expects about the environmental, political, and cultural issues surrounding ‘water.’ Perhaps more importantly, he learns about postcolonial exploitation and his own complicity, as well as the loss that can follow, not only for himself, but others.

This novel, inspired by the Bolivian Water Wars, offers students a creative text dealing with an environmental issue that leads to a social movement. Anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, rhetoricians, sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, as well as scholars of business, organizational communication, interpersonal communication, cultural studies and environmental studies will easily find a place in the curriculum for this novel. It is both a stand-alone novel and a sequel to the popular novel, Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues: A Case of Social Justice.
30 Years of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in Action towards Sustainability
This book investigates and uncover paradoxes and ambivalences that are actualised when seeking to make the right choices in the best interests of the child. The 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established a milestone for the 20th century. Many of these ideas still stand, but time calls for new reflections, empirical descriptions and knowledge as provided in this book.

Special attention is directed to the conceptualisation of children and childhood cultures, the missing voices of infants and fragile children, as well as transformations during times of globalisation and change. All chapters contribute to understand and discuss aspects of societal demands and cultural conditions for modern-day children age 0–18, accompanied by pointers to their future.

Contributors are: Eli Kristin Aadland, Wenche Bjorbækmo, Jorunn Spord Borgen, Gunn Helene Engelsrud, Kristin Vindhol Evensen, Eldbjørg Fossgard, Liv Torunn Grindheim, Asle Holthe, Liisa Karlsson, Stinne Gunder Strøm Krogager, Jonatan Leer, Ida Marie Lyså, Elin Eriksen Ødegaard, Czarecah Tuppil Oropilla, Susanne Højlund Pedersen, Anja Maria Pesch, Karen Klitgaard Povlsen, Gro Rugseth, Pauline von Bonsdorff, Hege Wergedahl and Susanne C. Ylönen.
The genealogy of racism dates back to 610 AD when Islamic jihadists invented whiteness as a religious justification for deracinating and enslaving African people out of East Africa and into Southeastern Europe for more than 1,300 years.

Through a new interdisciplinary research methodology, Ancestorology, a taxonomy of Western cultural and visual productions of history are juxtaposed with the social stratifications of the African Diaspora to arrive at a new interpretation of the historical narrative.

Decolonzing Arts-Based Methodologies: Researching the African Diaspora provokes critical analytical thought between the historical narrative and current public discourse in Western societies where people of African descent exist. The importance of this work begins the process of unlearning Western ways of knowing and seeing through hegemonic productions of knowledge and by assigning new values to humanity’s collective memory.
Integrating Practices and Perspectives for 21st Century Leadership
Author: Brad Kershner
Our ability to understand and improve the field of education depends upon our ability to understand human development, culture, and society. We cannot understand what is happening in schools unless we understand the context in which schools exist. Through meaningful stories of school leadership and critical reflections on theories of complex systems, this book offers a framework for understanding how the intractable dilemmas of education reflect and embody the social, cultural, and developmental patterns of society. From the concrete dilemmas of school leadership to the abstract vistas of integral meta-theory, this book is a guide to understanding how it all fits together, and how to encourage the holistic growth of students, teachers, leaders, and educational systems.
Accompany Jessica on a journey into her family’s past, into herself, and into the bicultural students she teaches but does not understand. Jessica, a fictional White fifth-grade teacher, is prompted to explore her German-American family history by the unexpected discovery of a hundred-year-old letter. White Bread pulls readers into a tumultuous six months of Jessica’s life as she confronts many issues that turn out to be interrelated: Why does she know so little about her German-American family’s past? Why are the Latino teachers advocating for Raza Studies, and what does that mean? Can she become the kind of teacher who sparks student learning?

The storyline alternates between past and present, acquainting readers with German-American communities in the Midwest during the late 1800s and early 1900s, portraits based on detailed historic excavation. What happened to these communities gives Jessica the key to unlock answers to questions that plague her.

White Bread can be read simply for pleasure. It can also be used in teacher education, ethnic studies, and sociology courses. Beginning teachers may see their own struggles reflected in Jessica’s classroom. People of European descent might see themselves within, rather than outside, multicultural and ethnic studies. White Bread might also launch family history research.