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Series:

Patricia Leavy

Film follows three women who moved to Los Angeles to pursue their dreams. Tash Daniels aspires to be a filmmaker. Her short film was rejected from festivals, she has a stack of rejected grant proposals, and she lost her internship at a studio when her boss harassed her, forcing her to take a job as a personal shopper. Lu K is a hot deejay slowly working her way up the club scene, but no one is doing her any favors. Fiercely independent, she’s at a loss when she meets Paisley, a woman who captures her heart. Monroe Preston is the glamorous wife of a Hollywood studio head. As a teenager she moved to LA in search of a “big” life, but now she wonders if reality measures up to fantasy. When a man in their circle finds sudden fame, each of these women is catapulted on a journey of self-discovery. As the characters’ stories unfold, each is forced to confront how her past has shaped her fears and to choose how she wants to live in the present. Film is a novel about the underside of dreams, the struggle to find internal strength, the power of art, and what it truly means to live a “big” life. Frequently shown bathed in the glow of the silver screen, the characters in Film show us how the arts can reignite the light within. With a tribute to popular culture, set against the backdrop of Tinseltown, Film celebrates how the art we make and consume can shape our stories, scene by scene. Although fictional, Film is loosely grounded in interview research. It can be read entirely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in women’s studies/gender studies, sociology, psychology, communication, popular culture, media studies, or qualitative inquiry. Film can be read as a stand-alone novel or as a sequel to the bestselling novel, Blue.

Living Sexuality

Stories of LGBTQ Relationships, Identities, and Desires

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Keith Berry, Catherine M. Gillotti and Tony Adams

There has never been a more crucial time for an intimate and thorough examination of the ways in which sexuality informs people’s lives. In Living Sexuality: Stories of LGBTQ Relationships, Identities, and Desires, the authors use autoethnography and personal narrative to provide first-hand accounts of the connections between sexuality, particularly LGBTQ identities, and the everyday experiences of relationships. Each story also invites readers to understand how sexuality informs communication as it occurs within diverse cultural contexts. In addition, the stories often focus on taboo issues overlooked or ignored in mainstream research about sexuality. Discussion questions appear at the end of each story that should stimulate engagement by students, instructors, and researchers.

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Edited by Nicholas D. Hartlep and Brandon O. Hensley

Critical Storytelling in Urban Education shares poems and stories written by college students attending Metropolitan State University in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. The poets and storytellers in this gripping volume address challenges they have faced: issues of sexual abuse, racial politics, cultural identity, stigmatization of marginalized communities, immigration, and other forms of struggle within and outside of urban educational settings. They are students in Education, Communication Studies, Business, and English, among other disciplines. Academic writing has been frequently reserved to professors and doctoral students. This collection is different in that the writing of undergraduate and master students is featured. In a world of unrest, strife, and division, critical stories are sacrosanct.

Mid-Career Faculty

Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities

Edited by Anita G. Welch, Jocelyn Bolin and Daniel Reardon

At a time when higher education institutions in the United States are the subject of increased media scrutiny and nearly continuous loss of funding by resource-strapped state legislatures, a greater understanding of higher education’s bulwark resource—mid-career research and teaching faculty—is more important than ever. Faculty at mid-career comprise the largest segment of academia. For some, this is a time of significant productivity and creativity, yet for others, it is a time of disillusionment and stagnation. Revealing impediments and pathways to faculty job satisfaction and productivity will strengthen higher education institutions by protecting, fostering, and maintaining this vital workforce. In this collection we will explore the lives of mid-career faculty as our authors uncover the complexities in this stage of professional life and discuss support systems for the transition into this period of faculties’ academic careers.

Mid-Career Faculty: Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities is designed for faculty leaders, administration, policymakers, and anyone concerned with the future of higher education. This text offers an examination into an often overlooked period of academic life, that of post-tenure mid-career faculty. Therefore, the aim of this text is to deepen our understanding of the lives of mid-career faculty, to identify barriers that impede job advancement and satisfaction, and to offer suggestions for changes to current policy and practice in higher education.

Contributors are: Joyce Alexander, Michael Bernard-Donals, Pradeep Bhardwaj, Kimberly Buch, Javier Cavazos, Jay R. Dee, Anne M. DeFelippo, Andrea Dulin, Jeremiah Fisk, Carrie Graham, Debbie L. Hahs-Vaughn, Florencio Eloy Hernandez, Yvette Huet, Jane McLeod, Jennifer McGarry, Maria L. Morales, Eliza Pavalko, Laura Plummer, Mandy Rispoli, Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw, J. Blake Scott, Michael Terwillegar, Jenna Thomas and Claudia Vela.

Expanding the Rainbow

Exploring the Relationships of Bi+, Polyamorous, Kinky, Ace, Intersex, and Trans People

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Edited by Brandy L. Simula, J.E. Sumerau and Andrea Miller

Expanding the Rainbow is the first comprehensive collection of research on the relationships of people who identify as bi+, poly, kinky, asexual, intersex, and/or trans that is written to be accessible to an undergraduate audience. The volume highlights a diverse range of identities, relationship structures, and understandings of bodies, sexualities, and interpersonal relationships. Contributions to the volume include original empirical research, personal narratives and reflections, and theoretical pieces that center the experiences of members of these communities, as well as teaching resources. Collectively, the chapters present a diverse, nuanced, and empirically rich picture of the variety of relationships and identities that individuals are creating in the twenty-first century.

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Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

Feminist Theory and Pop Culture (Second Edition) synthesizes feminist theory with modern portrayals of gender in media culture. This updated text provides comprehensive and interdisciplinary scholarship focused on topics related to:

– Historical examination of feminist theory.
– Application of feminist research methods.
– Feminist theoretical perspectives such as the male gaze, feminist standpoint theory, Black feminist thought, queer theory, masculinity theory, theories of feminist activism, and postfeminism.
– Contributor chapters cover a range of topics from Western perspectives on belly dance to television shows such as Girls, Scandal, and Orange is the New Black.
– Feminist theory and the wave of feminism, including a discussion of the fourth wave.
– Pedagogical features.
– Suggestions for further reading and discussion questions for classroom use.

Feminist Theory and Pop Culture was designed for classroom use and has been written with an eye toward engaging students in discussion. The book’s polished perspective on feminist theory juxtaposes popular culture with theoretical perspectives which have served as a foundation for the study of gender. This interdisciplinary text can serve as a primary or supplemental reading.

Gender and Pop Culture

A Text-Reader (Second Edition)

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Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

Gender and Pop Culture provides a foundation for the study of gender, pop culture, and media. This newly updated edition is comprehensive and interdisciplinary, providing both text-book style introductory and concluding chapters written by the editor. The text includes eight original contributor chapters on key topics and written in a variety of writing styles, discussion questions, additional resources, and more. Coverage includes:

– Foundations for studying gender and pop culture (history, theory, methods, key concepts).
– Contributor chapters on social media, technology, advertising, music, television, film, and sports.
– Ideas for activism and putting this book to use beyond the classroom.
– Pedagogical features.
– Suggestions for further readings on topics covered and international studies of gender and pop culture.


Gender and Pop Culture was designed with students in mind, to promote reflection and lively discussion. With features found in both textbooks and anthologies, this sleek book can serve as a primary or supplemental reading in courses across disciplines.

Teachers, Teaching, and Media

Original Essays about Educators in Popular Culture

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Edited by Mary M. Dalton and Laura R. Linder

Popular representations of teachers and teaching are easy to take for granted precisely because they are so accessible and pervasive. Our lives are intertextual in the way lived experiences overlap with the stories of others presented to us through mass media. It is this set of connected narratives that we bring into classrooms and into discussions of educational policy. In this day and time—with public education under siege by forces eager to deprofessionalize teaching and transfer public funds to benefit private enterprises—we ignore the dominant discourse about education and the patterns of representation that typify educator characters at our peril.

This edited volume offers a fresh take on educator characters in popular culture and also includes important essays about media texts that have not been addressed adequately in the literature previously. The 15 chapters cover diverse forms from literary classics to iconic teacher movies to popular television to rock ‘n’ roll. Topics explored include pedagogy through the lenses of gender, sexuality, race, disability, politics, narrative archetypes, curriculum, teaching strategies, and liberatory praxis. The various perspectives represented in this volume come from scholars and practitioners of education at all levels of schooling. This book is especially timely in an era when public education in the United States is under assault from conservative political forces and undervalued by the general public.

Contributors are: Steve Benton, Naeemah Clark, Kristy Liles Crawley, Elizabeth Currin, Mary M. Dalton, Jill Ewing Flynn, Chad E. Harris, Gary Kenton, Mark A. Lewis, Ian Parker Renga, Stephanie Schroeder, Roslin Smith, Jeff Spanke, and Andrew Wirth.

Time for Educational Poetics

Why Does the Future Need Educational Poetics?

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Xicoténcatl Martínez Ruiz

In Time for Educational Poetics the author addresses a discussion in the context of today’s philosophy of education and educational research. Conceptually, educational poetics is not limited to a theoretical construction, but rather focuses on the creative, imaginative and poetic experience, to being recreated in the teaching-learning process.

Educational poetics is rooted in the philosophical and aesthetic thought of South Asia, specifically in how contemplative and creative practices re-introduced by Rabindranath Tagore. Educational poetics is the convergence of research in creative contemplation and poetic creation, practices of conscious attention and mindfulness, and practices of peace education and philosophy of non-violence. This book leads to a perspective in thinking about the risks that jeopardize the future of young generations.

Beyond Nature Talk

Transforming Environmental Education with Critical and Queer Theories

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blake m. r. flessas and Timothy D. Zimmerman

Camping Science Education

A Trip to Camp Wilde and the Queer Nature of Nature

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Nicholas Santavicca, Jesse Bazzul and Stephen Witzig

Inviting the Mess

A Children’s Museum’s Transgressive Tactics for Unleashing Play

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Anna MacDermut and Adrian Zongrone

Critical Storytelling in Millennial Times

Undergraduates Share Their Stories of Struggle

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Edited by Carmella J. Braniger and Kaytlin M. Jacoby

Critical stories are more than just anecdotes or tales. They are narratives that raconter, or recount, the author’s own experiences, situating them in broader cultural contexts. Just as the autoethnographer situates the self in relation to the “others” of which the self is both a part and from which it is distinct, the critical storyteller situates his or her story of conflict in relation to the broader reality from which the conflict arises. The key is the reality that is being related and the perspective from which it is being shared.

In Critical Storytelling in Millennial Times, marginalized, excluded, and oppressed people share insights from their liminality and help readers learn from their perspectives and experiences. Examples of stories in this volume range from undergraduate perspectives on financial aid for college students, to narratives on first-hand police brutality, to heartbreaking tales about addiction, bullying, and the child sex trade in Cambodia. Undergraduate authors relate their stories and pose important questions to the reader about inciting change for the future. Follow along in their journeys and learn what you can do to make a change in your own reality.

Contributors are: Ben Brawner, Dwight Brown, Bryce Cherry, Kaytlin Jacoby, Jimmy Kruse, Dean Larrick, Bric Martin, Kara Niles, Claire Parrish, Grace Piper, Claire Prendergast, Alexsenia Ralat, Alec Reyes, Stephanie Simon, S. H. Suits, Katy Swift, Morgan Vogels, and Brittany Walsh.

STEM of Desire

Queer Theories and Science Education

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Edited by Will Letts and Steve Fifield

STEM of Desire: Queer Theories and Science Education locates, creates, and investigates intersections of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and queer theorizing. Manifold desires—personal, political, cultural—produce and animate STEM education. Queer theories instigate and explore (im)possibilities for knowing and being through desires normal and strange. The provocative original manuscripts in this collection draw on queer theories and allied perspectives to trace entanglements of STEM education, sex, sexuality, gender, and desire and to advance constructive critique, creative world-making, and (com)passionate advocacy. Not just another call for inclusion, this volume turns to what and how STEM education and diverse, desiring subjects might be(come) in relation to each other and the world.

STEM of Desire is the first book-length project on queering STEM education. Eighteen chapters and two poems by 27 contributors consider STEM education in schools and universities, museums and other informal learning environments, and everyday life. Subject areas include physical and life sciences, engineering, mathematics, nursing and medicine, environmental education, early childhood education, teacher education, and education standards. These queering orientations to theory, research, and practice will interest STEM teacher educators, teachers and professors, undergraduate and graduate students, scholars, policy makers, and academic libraries.

Contributors are: Jesse Bazzul, Charlotte Boulay, Francis S. Broadway, Erin A. Cech, Steve Fifield, blake m. r. flessas, Andrew Gilbert, Helene Götschel, Emily M. Gray, Kristin L. Gunckel, Joe E. Heimlich, Tommye Hutson, Kathryn L. Kirchgasler, Michelle L. Knaier, Sheri Leafgren, Will Letts, Anna MacDermut, Michael J. Reiss, Donna M. Riley, Cecilia Rodéhn, Scott Sander, Nicholas Santavicca, James Sheldon, Amy E. Slaton, Stephen Witzig, Timothy D. Zimmerman, and Adrian Zongrone.

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Kimberly Dark

The Daddies is a love letter to masculinity, a kaleidoscope of its pleasures and horrors. The question “Who’s your Daddy?” started showing up in mainstream cultural references during the 1990s. Those words can be spoken as a question, or a challenge, as a flirtation, a joke, or a threat. It’s all about inflection, intention, and who’s asking. Apparently, we have so much shared cultural meaning about “Daddy” the speakers and listeners can simply intuit meaning and proceed to laugh at the joke, or experience the shame, as appropriate. But who is Daddy in American culture? The Daddies aims to find out more than who – but how the process of knowing Daddy can prompt readers to know themselves and their society. This allegory about patriarchy unfolds as a kinky lesbian Daddy/girl love story. Daddy-ness is situated in all people, after all, and we each share responsibility for creating a fairer world. The Daddies can be used as a springboard for discussion in courses in sociology, gender and women's studies, cultural studies, sexuality studies and communication. As a work of fiction, The Daddies can also be enjoyed by general audiences.

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J.E. Sumerau

Finalist for 2019 Lambda Literary Award in Bisexual Fiction!
Finalist for 2019 Bisexual Book Awards in Young Adult Fiction!

Imagine engaging in sexual intimacy with someone you care about for the first time after surviving the loss of a serious, committed, loving relationship. In Palmetto Rose, this is where we find a bi+, gender fluid narrator affectionately called Kid by their loved ones. After five years trying to numb and escape the pain of losing their first love to a tragic accident, Kid begins to wake up, grieve, and try to rebuild their life in Atlanta, Georgia. Through their eyes, we watch as they seek to make sense of grief, pursue the possibility of a college education, and embark on their first serious romantic relationship since they were a teenager. In the process, we spend time with their chosen family of friends who navigate relationships, graduate programs, and developing careers. As the story unfolds, these friends face the ups and downs of early adulthood alongside the ways their individual and shared pasts find voices in their current endeavours, future plans, and intertwined lives. Although many characters in this story originally appeared in Cigarettes & Wine, Homecoming Queens, or Other People’s Oysters, Palmetto Rose may be read as a stand-alone novel.

Palmetto Rose may be used as an educational tool for people seeking to better understand growing numbers of openly bisexual, transgender, and poly people; as a supplemental reading for courses across disciplines dealing with gender, sexualities, relationships, families, the life course, narratives, emotions, the American south, identities, culture, and / or intersectionality; or it can, of course, be read entirely for pleasure.

Gender Warriors

Reading Contemporary Urban Fantasy

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Edited by U. Melissa Anyiwo and Amanda Hobson

Gender Warriors: Reading Contemporary Urban Fantasy offers classroom-ready original essays outlining contemporary debates about sexual objectification and gender norms in urban fantasy and examining how those cultural categories are reinforced and unraveled. The essays explore the foundations and evolutions of urban fantasy and presentations of gendered identities in a wide variety of sources, focusing not only on popular examples, such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Underworld, but also on less studied works, for instance Penny Dreadful and Anita Blake.

The authors address the sociocultural institutions that bind gender to the body and shape our views of gendered norms, inviting students of all experience levels to engage in interdisciplinary conversations about both theoretical and embodied constructions of gender and the production of genre and generic conventions. The text unpacks cultural norms of gender and addresses issues of identity construction within an endlessly evolving genre. This collection demonstrates the way that representations of gender and the kick-ass female urban fantasy warrior have upended and reinforced a broad range of expectations and tropes, making it a fascinating text for any course, such as first-year studies, literature, film, gender studies, sociology, cultural studies, history, and more.

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Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

To consider gender and politics is to ask “Who has the power?” The Politics of Gender attempts to break through power structures by examining the institutional roles each play. This text takes several approaches to understanding the politics of gender, beginning with an introductory chapter focused on the major terms and theoretical approaches connected to political and gender studies.

Topics covered throughout the book include a historical discussion of the feminist movement, an analysis of the 2017 Women’s March on Washington, the nomination (and subsequent reactions) of Hillary Clinton, the impact Michelle Obama had for women of color as the first African-American First Lady, as well as the ways lesbian women’s bodies are scrutinized. In addition, this volume addresses the ways gender is litigated by examining the rights of lesbian women in Nigeria, the treatment of trans-gender people while in prison, and the connection between gun laws and intimate partner violence.

Finally, this text provides the reader with suggestions for community involvement, resources for voting, reading, film and Podcast recommendations, all combined with the stories of two women who discuss the change they created in their communities.

Equity and Internationalization on Campus

Intersecting or Colliding Discourses for LGBTQ People?

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Kaela Jubas

Every day, we hear how people, organizations, and ideas are moving across borders. We also hear about fairness and justice as fundamental social values. How, though, do these two discourses—one related to internationalization and the other to equity—converge in lived experience? The post-secondary institution is one setting where that question might be asked and people who are minoritized for their gender or sexual identities can provide important answers. While equity-oriented discourses assure LGBT people that they will be free from harassment and discrimination, an internationalization discourse might call them to engage in places where they are illegal. Equity and Internationalization on Campus shares findings from a Canadian study that explored how LGBT or ally post-secondary faculty, students, and staff encountered these two discourses. It offers much to scholars and staff committed to developing an equitable version of internationalization and an international version of equity.

Disrupting Shameful Legacies

Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence

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Edited by Claudia Mitchell and Relebohile Moletsane

Much has been written in Canada and South Africa about sexual violence in the context of colonial legacies, particularly for Indigenous girls and young women. While both countries have attempted to deal with the past through Truth and Reconciliation Commissions and Canada has embarked upon its National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, there remains a great deal left to do. Across the two countries, history, legislation and the lived experiences of young people, and especially girls and young women point to a deeply rooted situation of marginalization. Violence on girls’ and women’s bodies also reflects violence on the land and especially issues of dispossession. What approaches and methods would make it possible for girls and young women, as knowers and actors, especially those who are the most marginalized, to influence social policy and social change in the context of sexual violence?

Taken as a whole, the chapters in Disrupting Shameful Legacies: Girls and Young Women Speaking Back through the Arts to Address Sexual Violence which come out of a transnational study on sexual violence suggest a new legacy, one that is based on methodologies that seek to disrupt colonial legacies, by privileging speaking up and speaking back through the arts and visual practice to challenge the situation of sexual violence. At the same time, the fact that so many of the authors of the various chapters are themselves Indigenous young people from either Canada or South Africa also suggests a new legacy of leadership for change.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.
The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.
The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

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Edited by Norvella P. Carter and Michael Vavrus

In Intersectionality of Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in Teaching and Teacher Education, the editors bring together scholarship that employs an intersectionality approach to conditions that affect public school children, teachers, and teacher educators. Chapter authors use intersectionality to examine group identities not only for their differences and experiences of oppression, but also for differences within groups that contribute to conflicts among groups. This collection moves beyond single-dimension conceptions that undermines legal thinking, disciplinary knowledge, and social justice. Intersectionality in this collection helps complicate static notions of race, ethnicity, class, and gender in education. Hence, this book stands as an addition to research on educational equity in relation to institutional systems of power and privilege.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

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Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

Looking Back and Living Forward

Indigenous Research Rising Up

Series:

Edited by Jennifer Markides and Laura Forsythe

Looking Back and Living Forward: Indigenous Research Rising Up brings together research from a diverse group of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The work shared in this book is done by and with Indigenous peoples, from across Canada and around the world. Together, the collaborators’ voices resonate with urgency and insights towards resistance and resurgence.

The various chapters address historical legacies, environmental concerns, community needs, wisdom teachings, legal issues, personal journeys, educational implications, and more. In these offerings, the contributors share the findings from their literature surveys, document analyses, community-based projects, self-studies, and work with knowledge keepers and elders. The scholarship draws on the teachings of the past, experiences of the present, and will undoubtedly inform research to come.

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Edited by George Sirrakos Jr. and Christopher Emdin

Borrowing from the ideas of John Dewey, schools and classrooms are a reflection of the world; therefore, in order to make sense of the urban classroom, we need to make sense of the world. In this book, the editors have compiled a collection of nine critical essays, or chapters, each examining a particular contemporary national and/or international event. The essays each undertake an explicit approach to naming oppression and addressing it in the context of urban schooling. Each essay has a two-fold purpose. The first purpose is to help readers see the world unveiled, through a more critical lens, and to problematize long held beliefs about urban classrooms, with regard to race, gender, social class, equity, and access. Second, as each author draws parallels between an event and urban classrooms, a better understanding of the microstructures that exist in urban classrooms emerges.

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J.E. Sumerau

Imagine the terror and exhilaration of a first sexual experience in a church where you could be caught at any moment. In Cigarettes & Wine, this is where we meet an unnamed teenage narrator in a small southern town trying to make sense of their own bisexuality, gender variance, and emerging adulthood. When our narrator leaves the church, we watch their teen years unfold alongside one first love wrestling with his own sexuality and his desire for a relationship with God, and another first love seeking to find herself as she moves away from town. Through the narrator’s eyes, we also encounter a newly arrived neighbor who appears to be an all American boy, but has secrets and pain hidden behind his charming smile and athletic ability, and their oldest friend who is on the verge of romantic, artistic, and sexual transformations of her own.
Along the way, these friends confront questions about gender and sexuality, violence and substance abuse, and the intricacies of love and selfhood in the shadow of churches, families, and a small southern town in the 1990’s. Alongside academic and media portrayals that generally only acknowledge binary sexual and gender options, Cigarettes & Wine offers an illustration of non-binary sexual and gender experience, and provides a first person view of the ways the people, places, and narratives we encounter shape who we become.
While fictional, Cigarettes & Wine is loosely grounded in hundreds of formal and informal interviews with LGBTQ people in the south as well as years of research into intersections of sexualities, gender, religion, and health. Cigarettes & Wine can be read purely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in sexualities, gender, relationships, families, religion, the life course, narratives, the American south, identities, culture, intersectionality, and arts-based research.

From Tarzan to Homer Simpson

Education and the Male Violence of the West

Sócrates Nolasco

"A valid contribution to the contemporary discussion of gender equality and sex differences. . . constitutes an important source of reflection in a changing world, in which confusion seems to be more the norm than actual freedom for all. "—As reviewed by Noga Sklar, in Times of Israel
Men have lower life expectancy than women; they account for 90% of the incarcerated population; they die more often in traffic accidents, from alcohol and drug consumption, and they commit more suicides than women. Since that information has been accessible for a long time, why is it not taken into account when campaigns are created and actions are defined? Violence is not an ‘entity’: it is male.
Confronted with that reality, the author sought to formulate the question orientating towards the following working hypothesis: this ‘common knowledge’should be forgotten, given that the involvement of men in situations of violence plays an important role in the preservation of political ideation in contemporary societies.
During this study it became clear that men are exposed to a more complex type of death than mere physical death, but just as important, which is relative to their social representation. This insight led to understanding other aspects that could be associated with men’s intense involvement in situations of violence. Could it be that in contemporary culture a purpose is served by keeping men involved with situations of violence? If so, what might that be?

Catherine Thompson-Lee

This book presents an exploration of heteronormative discursive practices in the English countryside. A lesbian teacher describes her experiences in the rural school community in which she lived and worked. She prospered at the village school for almost ten years by censoring her sexuality and carefully managing the intersection between her private and professional identities. However, when a critical incident led to the exposure of her sexuality at school, she learned the extent to which the rural school community privileged and protected the heteronormative discourse.
An autoethnographic method of inquiry provides intimate insight which is supported by external data, including email and text message correspondence. As the critical incident eventually became a police matter, police records and evidence from the UK Crown Prosecution Service were sought for use in the research. However, the collection of these data proved problematic, providing an unexpected development in the research and offering additional insight into the nature of rural life.
This research offers a vivid insider perspective on the experiences of a lesbian teacher in a rural school community. It examines the incompatibility of private and professional identities, investigates the moral panic that surrounds teacher sexuality in schools and considers the impact of homophobic and heteronormative discursive practices on health, wellbeing and identity. Crucially, this research offers compelling insight into the steps that those in positions of power will take to protect and perpetuate the heteronormative discourse of rural life.

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Edited by Patricia Leavy

Winner of the 2018 USA Best Book Awards (Anthologies: Non-Fiction)!
Finalist in the categories Multi-Cultural Nonfiction and Education/Academic.

A contemporary alternative to the other texts on the market featuring original essays.
Contributors include Jean Kilbourne, Robin M. Boylorn, and Donna Y. Ford

Privilege Through the Looking-Glass is a collection of original essays that explore privilege and status characteristics in daily life. This collection seeks to make visible that which is often invisible. It seeks to sensitize us to things we have been taught not to see. Privilege, power, oppression, and domination operate in complex and insidious ways, impacting groups and individuals, and yet, these forces that affect our lives so deeply seem to at once operate in plain sight and lurk in the shadows, making them difficult to discern. Like water to a fish, environments are nearly impossible to perceive when we are immersed in them. This book attempts to expose our environments. With engaging and powerful writing, the contributors share their personal stories as a means of connecting the personal and the public.

This volume applies an intersectional perspective to explore how race, class, gender, sexuality, education, and ableness converge, creating the basis for privilege and oppression. Privilege Through the Looking-Glass encourages readers to engage in self and social reflection, and can be used in a range of courses in sociology, social work, communication, education, gender studies, and African American studies. Each chapter includes discussion questions and/or activities for further engagement.

Women between Submission and Freedom

An Interpretation of Social and Political Misogyny

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Huda Sharawi

Women between Submission and Freedom is a cultural, historical, and spiritual inquiry into the nature of contemporary Eastern and Western society which highlights the gender inequality plaguing contemporary Arabian culture. The author has witnessed first-hand the role of cultural influences in her religion and society. Her analysis begins with personal stories and everyday instances of misogynistic behavior suffered by herself and those around her.
The author delivers an important message about the deception and brainwashing of women in these communities. She bears witness to a culture which has taught women to be submissive and accept the fact that their societal value only exists in relation and deference to men. Whether through direct or indirect pressure, such communities reduce the innate human value of women, at the same time as the patriarchal system reduces them to virtual slavery. This systematic denigration includes not only the misogynistic mentality, but the historical suppression of women’s ideas and creations.
The author explores the portrayal of women in a range of religions that employ gender-based social intimidation under the cloak of religion. The interpretation of these verses is based on the societal values and politics of those who lead and protect the patriarchal system. To them, religion is not an ethos, but a weapon.

Women of Influence in Education

Practising Dilemmas and Contesting Spaces

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Edited by Nita Cherry and Joy Higgs

The goal in writing this book was to stimulate more comprehensive conversations about women in leadership situations (particularly secondary and tertiary education contexts) by understanding how women have gone about creating positive differences in educational environments.
Frequently books about women and leadership deal with the politics of this discussion space and the statistics of women succeeding to and through the glass ceiling, or not! The focus of this book is on a different space: on learning from the experiences of women doing leadership work.
The research strategy underpinning the book was to listen to the voices and stories of 28 women occupying senior roles in education. Half of these women were principals of independent Victorian secondary schools and the other half were in professorial and senior leadership roles in Victorian universities. Through this listening and pondering on their experiences the authors came to recognise that these women of influence were working in contested spaces and facing multiple practice dilemmas. Readers are invited to explore these spaces and dilemmas, considering the learnings from the women whose lives, views and experiences are represented here.

Through a Distorted Lens

Media as Curricula and Pedagogy in the 21st Century

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Edited by Laura M. Nicosia and Rebecca A. Goldstein

This volume examines what and how the media teach, to and by whom, and for what purpose, in a rapidly shifting milieu of media content, platforms, and relations. While intimately concerned with education, authors move the discussion beyond the setting of formal schooling to uncover the ways in which the media contribute to individual and collective understandings of self and other, and their relations to society and communities in which they move. In doing so, the text encourages readers to transcend exclusionary discussions of citizenship to consider participation in local and global geographies against a neoliberal backdrop that marginalizes those unable to, unwilling to, and excluded from competing in the free market. Contributors extend their deliberations back to formal school settings to reaffirm pedagogies that rediscover the reading of texts—broadly defined—in the world through multimodalities. In this sense, the text strives to be transdisciplinary, and is appropriate for use in multiple disciplines and fields of study.

Barrio Nerds

Latino Males, Schooling, and the Beautiful Struggle

Juan F. Carrillo

When Pulitzer Prize nominated author Richard Rodriguez published his autobiography, Hunger of Memory: The Education of Richard Rodriguez in 1982, he received much criticism due to his views on issues such as assimilation, bilingual education, and affirmative action. Polemically, since Rodriguez’s publication, a book length revisiting of some of his ideas is for the most part non-existent.

Inspired by Rodriguez’s work, Barrio Nerds: Latino Males, Schooling, and the Beautiful Struggle presents a compelling window into the schooling trajectories of Latino males, while also providing critical and alternative views. These portraits of working-class students and academics that achieved academic success move beyond clean victory narratives and thus complicate our notions of “success” and “rising up.” Blending versus separating the exploration of street kid/school kid identities, we get a glimpse into the merging and collision of multiple cultural worlds in ways that are liberating and often painful and full of ambivalence. Additionally, we get provocative takes on giftedness, the philosophical and political dimensions of “home,” and masculinities.

Ultimately, Barrio Nerds: Latino Males, Schooling, and the Beautiful Struggle is a reminder of how academic achievement is often embedded in gain and in loss and it is a thoughtful meditation on how many Latino males of working-class origins do not reject the past, but instead use this precious knowledge to holistically live out the present.

Chinese Dreams? American Dreams?

The Lives of Chinese Women Scientists and Engineers in the United States

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Diane Yu Gu

Immigrant Chinese women scientists and engineers who study and work in the United States constitute a rapidly growing yet understudied group. These women’s lived experiences and reflections can tell us a great deal about the current state of immigrant women scientists in the United States, how universities can help these women succeed, and about China’s emergence as a global scientific and technological superpower.
Chinese Dreams? American Dreams? is the first ethnographic study to document migrating Chinese-born women scientists’ and engineers’ educational experiences and careers in the U. S. It historically situates these women in current political, economic, and cultural contexts and examines the successful strategies they employ to survive discrimination, advance careers, establish networks, and promote transnational research collaborations during their educational and career journeys in the U. S. This study makes a valuable text for students, researchers, and policy makers in higher education, women’s studies, science and engineering studies, as well as for faculty who teach future scientists and engineers. It also introduces new multicultural, intersectional, and feminist perspectives on these crucial issues of gender, ethnicity, nationality, and class, as they impact women’s professional lives.

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Edited by Amanda Hobson and U. Melissa Anyiwo

Gender in the Vampire Narrative addresses issues of masculinity and femininity, unpacking cultural norms of gender. This collection demonstrates the way that representations of gender in the vampire narrative traverse a large scope of expectations and tropes. The text offers classroom ready original essays that outline contemporary debates about sexual objectification and gender norms using the lens of the vampire in order to examine the ways those roles are undone and reinforced through popular culture through a specific emphasis on cultural fears and anxieties about gender roles. The essays explore the presentations of gendered identities in a wide variety of sources including novels, films, graphic novels and more, focusing on wildly popular examples, such as The Vampire Diaries, True Blood, and Twilight, and also lesser known works, for instance, Byzantium and The Blood of the Vampire. The authors work to unravel the ties that bind gender to the body and the sociocultural institutions that shape our views of gendered norms and invite students of all levels to engage in interdisciplinary conversations about both theoretical and embodied constructions of gender.

Edited by James Etim

Africa has witnessed massive changes in the last fifty years—from independence through structural adjustment, rule by military juntas in several countries and to a period now where the focus is on how best to prioritize their needs based on resources, national goals and human potential. There is general agreement that human capital is important in economic growth and development. There is always the need to ensure that resources and human capital are used appropriately to advance development. Gender disparities, whether in treatment, access to resources, resource utilization and the law, may in themselves retard or slow down development. Resources and human potential in all societies include how best to ensure there is no gender disparity and to fully tap the resources inherent in women for personal, social and national development. Beginning with the women’s suffrage movement, there has been the push to encourage gender equality worldwide. The Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995 embodies the commitment of the international community to implement policies that will enhance the political, social, economic, educational empowerment of women. This book highlights the issues affecting women in Eastern and Southern Africa—what role does custom and patriarchy play in gender disparities in education, access to health, problems in the workplace and family relationships? How have women writers in the last twenty years presented the issues of patriarchy, women’s rights, globalism and women’s holistic development? What are recent developments that have helped improve the situation for some women? These are some of the issues that are covered in this book. The thesis of this book is that there have been policies and strategies developed that have worked to empower women. However, vestiges of sexism, gender disparities in several fields still remain and traditions/customs and patriarchy have aided in still keeping women down.

Negotiating Belongings

Stories of Forced Migration of Dinka Women from South Sudan

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Melanie Baak

Belonging is an issue that affects us all, but for those who have been displaced, unsettled or made ‘homeless’ by the increased movements associated with the contemporary globalising era, belonging is under constant challenge. Migration throws into question not only the belongings of those who physically migrate, but also, particularly in a postcolonial context, the belongings of those who are indigenous to and ‘settlers’ in countries of migration, subsequent generations born to migrants, and those who are left behind in countries of origin. Negotiating Belongings utilises narrative, ethnographic and autoethnographic approaches to explore the negotiations for belonging for six women from Dinka communities originating in southern Sudan. It explores belonging, particularly in relation to migration, through a consideration of belonging to nation-states, ethnic groups, community, family and kin. In exploring how the journeys towards desired belongings are haunted by various social processes such as colonisation, power, ‘race’ and gender, the author argues that negotiating belonging is a continual movement between being and becoming. The research utilises and demands different ways of listening to and really hearing the narratives of the women as embedded within non-Western epistemologies and ontologies. Through this it develops an understanding of the relational ontology, cieng, that governs the ways in which the women exist in the world. The women’s narratives alongside the author’s experience within the Dinka community provide particular ways to interrogate the intersections of being and becoming on the haunted journey to belonging. The relational ontology of cieng provides an additional way of understanding belonging, becoming and being as always relational.

Teaching and Learning Like a Feminist

Storying Our Experiences in Higher Education

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Elizabeth Mackinlay

Teaching and Learning Like a Feminist is a conversation between academics in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies about the politics of pedagogy in higher education. What does it mean to embody feminism in universities today? Written in a creative narrative style, Mackinlay explores the discursive, material and affective dimensions of what it might mean to live the personal-as-political-as-performative in our work as teachers and learners in the contemporary climate of neo-liberal universities. This book is both theory and story and aims to bring feminist theorists such as Virginia Woolf, Hélène Cixous, Sara Ahmed and bell hooks together in conversation with Mackinlay’s own experiences, and those of women she interviewed, in their diverse roles as ‘feminist-academic-subjects’. The fluid writing style presented is a deliberate attempt to enact a ‘post-academic’ form of literature and is playfully punctuated by black and white drawings. Teaching and Learning Like a Feminist captures the precarious position of Women and Gender Studies in universities today, as well as the ‘danger’ inherent in grounding teaching and learning work in feminist politics. Mackinlay wraps herself in both and invites us to do the same. This book is designed to stimulate reflection and lively class discussion and is appropriate for courses in curriculum studies and pedagogy, education, feminism and feminist theory, gender and women’s studies, and narrative inquiry.

Terra Ludus

A Novel about Media, Gender and Sport

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Toni Bruce

Set in the near future, Terra Ludus follows a group of friends as their lives are turned upside down by the downstream effects of the actions of the protagonist, Daniela Bartoli. Five years after the professional International Women’s Basketball League is unceremoniously dumped by its parent men’s organization, Daniela is working in Los Angeles as a freelance journalist and playing regular weekend pick-up games with her friends Mike, Constantin, Dominic and Simeon. Her relatively simple life changes almost overnight after her vlog, challenging a powerful media corporation to step up and broadcast women’s basketball, goes viral. The publicity sets off a chain reaction that brings the sport back into international prominence and sucks Daniela into a vortex of media and public visibility that leads her to question what is really important. In an imagined context where all professional sport takes place in a single country—something like a permanent Olympic Games—we follow a cast of characters with very different viewpoints on a roller-coaster, year-long, journey as they adjust to the new women’s league. Although fictional, Terra Ludus is grounded in decades of researching, theorizing, teaching and writing about women’s sport and media representation. Terra Ludus can be read entirely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in courses in sport, media, gender, communication, journalism, sociology, creative writing, performance, physical education and cultural studies.

Understanding Girls

Quantitative and Qualitative Research

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Dale Rose Baker

Understanding Girls: Quantitative and Qualitative Research is a retrospective of the author’s research that led to receiving the 2013 Distinguished Contributions Award to Science Education through Research. This book includes selected articles that document changes in her research approaches and theoretical frameworks. The articles represent the evolution of her thinking about the issue of girls in science as well as her impact on science education. The author’s work is placed in the context of science education research at the time of publication, research in education and psychology, and the culture of the times. She pulls back the curtain that often makes the messy work of research seem straightforward and linear to reveal why she did the research and the methodological decisions she faced. She describes the serendipitous nature of some of the work as well as her frustrations in trying to understand data, and struggles to insure that she accurately and respectfully presented the voices of girls and their teachers. The book also includes some of the earliest research in engineering education preceding the focus on engineering practices found in the Next Generation Science and Engineering Standards. Understanding Girls provides insights into why girls may or may not decide to participate in science and engineering and what can be done to increase their participation. It provides evidence that we have increased girls’ participation and the challenges that remain to insure that every girl who wants to become a scientist or engineer has the opportunity to do so.

Blackeyed

Plays and Monologues

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Mary E. Weems

Winner! Emerging Artist Award (Literature) from the 2015 Cleveland Arts Prize (May 2015)

Blackeyed is a collection of plays and monologues. The topics covered in the book include housing and foreclosure, suicide, assault, mental health, the Black male experience, and more. The book intersects with critical race theory because the majority of this work positions race at the center of the experiences of the fictional or fictionalized characters. Embedded in these chapters are the interweaving of personal and ancestral stories, news reports, informal conversations, observations, interviews, and online research expressed in language unapologetically Black, critical, reflexive, and proud.

Blackeyed can be used as a class text in theatre, education, creative writing, communication, women’s studies, sociology, and African American studies undergraduate and graduate courses. It can also be used by theatre practitioners, including actors and directors, working in community, regional and national theatre settings. Individuals including qualitative researchers interested in exploring more affective possibilities or arts-based researchers can also read this collection as an example of methodological exemplar. Finally, anyone interested in the Black experience as well as the specific topics covered in this book can read this collection of plays as one might read a collection of short stories.

" Weems’ resonant poetic voice shines through the characters in bursts of dialect and nuance. Human conflict, racial undertones and the struggle for civil and human rights reverberate. If one were to attempt to connect with a glimpse of the lives of African Americans in this country absent from classroom history books and the limited cinematic mainstream depictions, Blackeyed is perfect starting point. In all of its admitted “messiness”, it provides context, perspective, form and substance. Through it all, the spirit of cultural authenticity is woven through the fabric of these narratives, perhaps unbeknownst to its author, connecting the DNA of the ancestors who planted the seeds of exposition in a griot long before her awareness of their existence. In the Now, they are undoubtedly marveling at the flower that blooms much to the delight of those exposed to its hauntingly tragic beauty." -- Vince Robinson

Dr. Mary Weems exhibits her best writing through monologic and poetic forms in this intriguing collection of short dramatic works about African American experiences. Multiple voices showcase their characters’ struggles, humor, and triumphs through realistic and expressionistic modes. You don’t just “read” her dialogue; you hear it on the page. Weems’ writing styles are fluid, haunting, angry, poignant, and arresting. This is exciting theatrical work by one of qualitative inquiry’s most notable and important voices.” – Johnny Saldaña, Professor Emeritus, Arizona State University, Author of Ethnotheatre: Research from Page to Stage

Mary Weems exemplifies literary arts-based inquiry practice in her new collection of plays, monologues and poems on the Black experience. She mines memory, history and auto/ethnography to craft pieces that are equal parts affective and effective. Affective in terms of their emotional impact and as acts of deep empathy. Effective in the ongoing struggle for social justice, equality and freedom. Weems shows us what risk-taking looks like in creative analytic practice: herwork embodies what Jonathan Lear calls “radical hope” as she insistson an ethical and caring stance in the face of cultural devastation. Read and learn.” – Monica Prendergast, University of Victoria, CoEditor, Poetic Inquiry: Vibrant Voices in the Social Sciences

In this rare and precious work, Mary Weems takes the reader into the lives of myriad human, abstract and material others, who capture our attention and imagination, pulling us into their personal-political worlds. We feel their breath and their blood, their passions and their longings; we know their disappointments, their anger, their love. Weems’s writing does this for us. Tackling urgent social and political issues through/with finely-wrought characters, Weems’ book, in its power and its craft, leaves us changed. Something shifts.” – Jonathan Wyatt, The University of Edinburgh, Author of Always in thresholds, Departures in Critical Qualitative Research, 3, 1, 8-17

It was fantastic, powerful, and intellectually rich. I love the way it connected disciplines; humanities, social sciences. It was a very liberal arts performance with a multidisciplinary perspective.” -- Denison University President Adam Weinberg, on Dr Mary Weems' performance of Black Notes at the DU campus on Martin Luther King Day 2016. (Black Notes is Dr Weems' one-woman play, which features several excerpts from her book Blackeyed).

Feminism in Community

Adult Education for Transformation

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Leona M. English and Catherine J. Irving

Winner! 2016 Cyril O. Houle Award from the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE).
The Cyril O. Houle Award was established in 1981 to honor the scholarship and memory of Cyril O. Houle, Professor of Adult Education at the University of Chicago. It is given annually by the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) for a book published in English in the previous year that reflects universal concerns of adult educators.
About The Book
In this award-winning book, the authors draw upon their earlier research examining how feminists have negotiated identity and learning in international contexts or multisector environments. Feminism in Community focuses on feminist challenges to lead, learn, and participate in nonprofit organizations, as well as their efforts to enact feminist pedagogy through arts processes, Internet fora, and critical community engagement.
The authors bring a focused energy to the topic of women and adult learning, integrating insights of pedagogy and theory-informed practice in the fields of social movement learning, transformative learning, and community development. The social determinants of health, spirituality, research partnerships, and policy engagement are among the contexts in which such learning occurs. In drawing attention to the identity and practice of the adult educator teaching and learning with women in the community, the authors respond to gender mainstreaming processes that have obscured women as a discernible category in many areas of practice.

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Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek

Feminist Theory and Pop Culture synthesizes feminist theory with modern portrayals of gender in media culture. This comprehensive and interdisciplinary text includes an introductory chapter written by the editor as well as nine contributor chapters of original content. Included in the text:
Historical illustration of feminist theory
Application of feminist research methods for the study of gender
Feminist theoretical perspectives such as the male gaze, feminist standpoint theory, Black feminist thought, queer theory, masculinity theory, theories of feminist activism and postfeminism
Contributor chapters cover a range of topics from Western perspectives on Belly Dance classes to television shows such as GIRLS, Scandal and Orange is the New Black, as well as chapters which discuss gendered media forms like “chick lit”, comic books and Western perspectives of non-Western culture in film
Feminist theory as represented in the different waves of feminism, including a discussion of a fourth wave
Pedagogical features
Suggestions for further reading on topics covered
Discussion questions for classroom use

Gender Lessons

Patriarchy, Sextyping & Schools

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Scott Richardson

Public schools in early America were designed to ensure the reproduction of Eurocentric social values. It could be argued that little has changed. Gender Lessons takes an in-depth look at how schools institutionalize gender—how kids are taught the rules and expectations of performing masculinity and femininity. This work provides extensive examples of how elementary, middle, and high schools: sextype; defend and preserve patriarchy; weave gendered expectations in all things school related; promote inequity; and limit their students’ potential by explicitly and implicitly teaching that they must fit into only one of two boxes…“girl” or “boy.” Richardson argues that schools—a powerful and wide reaching publicly funded mechanism—should be engaged in social (re)imagination that disbands the antiquated girl/boy and feminine/masculine binary so that kids might have a chance at being themselves. This book is sure to provoke conversation in courses and professional communities interested in education, gender studies, social work, sociology, counseling and guidance.
Cover art: Emily A. Pellini

The Male Clock

A Futuristic Novel about a Fertility Crisis, Gender Politics, and Identity

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William Marsiglio and Kendra Siler-Marsiglio

As speculative fiction informed by social science and biomedical perspectives, The Male Clock propels readers into a futuristic, yet believable world transformed by SGEV—a debilitating virus that drastically compromises men’s ability to procreate. Set mostly in the years 2034-2042, Jordan Giordano, a prominent American journalist, navigates a world steeped in personal misfortune and public controversy. Jordan chronicles his intimate struggle to become a father and family man while doing investigative reporting related to the ever changing social landscape with its radically altered sexual politics, heated public debates, and new technologies. The troubled era is defined by its upswing in baby farming, pharma company transgressions, new S. W. A. T. -based and bioterrorism technologies, sperm retrieval companies, sperm ID cards, devices preventing wet dreams, a surge in lesbian relationships and male prostitution, sperm-donating priests, and more.
Because the novel explores the gendered dimensions to family, interpersonal relations, reproductive and public health, and identity issues it can serve as a provocative supplemental text for diverse courses in sociology, psychology, gender studies, sexualities, history, public health, and related fields. The plot should resonate with young people as well as persons thinking about or trying to have children. Ultimately, The Male Clock will compel people to question how individuals and groups cope with unwanted social change that challenges our identities and social conventions.

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Edited by Joanna Ostrouch-Kami and Cristina C. Vieira

FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE AS OPEN ACCESS BOOK!

This book is the third production from the ESREA Gender network and, once more, an opportunity to let the readers discover, or to know more, for a better understanding of questions related to gender and adult learning. It shows how researchers can be deeply involved in this specific field of adult education. The notion of informal learning has already been treated as a chapter in the 2003s book, but it becomes central and relevant in this new book considering the growing complexity of our society.
The editors insist in their title on “private world(s)” but the content of the book proves that informal learning processes, aside the self, are combined with contextual opportunities, which have been chosen or not. Their introduction remains what has to be known about the concepts of gender and informal learning. The contributors enlighten the debate with their geographical diversities all over Europe, but also with their theoretical systems of reference and the social contexts that have been analysed.
With the first part of this book, entitled “private spheres”, it is a sum of painful gendered discriminations and injustices which are presented and analysed. We can’t escape to the emotions it produces especially with the soldiers after the war and the men’s breath cancer: both researches related to men and the specificity of their suffering. This is an interesting and quite new opportunity to question gender.
In the second part related to “minorities and activism”, we discover groups who learn through their organised fights against discriminations. Emotions let place to a positive energy when we discover the strategies that feminists, or migrants or also retired men find to question the society in which they live. The authors show us not only what is learned by such communities, but also what their environment can learn from them.
The last part of the book drives us to different “contexts of informal learning”, mostly related to opportunities and obstacles in education and work situations. Community training, social work studies, scientist’s work and management school are the contexts chosen to clarify where the stereotypes and the discriminations along the lifespan for women are. From East to West and North to South of Europe, it seems once more that the debate presents a lot of similarities.

Edited by Christa Boske and Azadeh Osanloo

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Edited by Leila Gómez, Asunción Horno-Delgado, Mary K. Long and Núria Silleras-Fernández

Teaching Gender through Latin American, Latino, and Iberian Texts and Cultures provides a dynamic exploration of the subject of teaching gender and feminism through the fundamental corpus encompassing Latin American, Iberian and Latino authors and cultures from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. The four editors have created a collaborative forum for both experienced and new voices to share multiple theoretical and practical approaches to the topic. The volume is the first to bring so many areas of study and perspectives together and will serve as a tool for reassessing what it means to teach gender in our fields while providing theoretical and concrete examples of pedagogical strategies, case studies relating to in-class experiences, and suggestions for approaching gender issues that readers can experiment with in their own classrooms. The book will engage students and educators around the topic of gender within the fields of Latin American, Latino and Iberian studies, Gender and Women’s studies, Cultural Studies, English, Education, Comparative Literature, Ethnic studies and Language and Culture for Specific Purposes within Higher Education programs.

Alliances for Advancing Academic Women

Guidelines for Collaborating in STEM Fields

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Edited by Penny J. Gilmer, Berrin Tansel and Michelle Hughes Miller

This unique book provides important guidelines and examples of ways STEM (e. g., science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) faculty and administration can collaborate towards goals of recruiting, mentoring, and promoting leadership to academic women faculty. Based on the experiences of faculty across five Florida universities, including one national laboratory, each chapter highlights one aspect of a multi-institutional collaboration on an NSF ADVANCE-PAID grant dedicated to achieving these three goals.
Highlighting the importance of coordination, integration, and flexibility, each chapter details strategies and challenges of establishing a multi-site collaboration, assessing climate in STEM departments, addressing differential institutional readiness and infrastructure, and implementing change. The authors suggest ways to build on intrainstitutional strengths through interinstitutional activities, including shared workshops, research, and materials.
Separate chapters focus on recruiting women into STEM departments, mentoring women faculty, and providing leadership opportunities to women. A theoretical chapter includes Cultural historical activity theory as a lens for examining the alliances’ activities and evaluation data. Other chapters present research on women STEM faculty, contributing insights about STEM women’s sense of isolation. Chapters include a reflective metalogue written by a social scientist. The book closes with lessons learned from this collaboration.

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Claretha Hughes

American Black women bring different interpersonal leadership styles to Fortune and non-Fortune 500 organizations. Their interpersonal leadership styles are developed at home, within their community, through their educational experiences, and within society. They bring unique perspectives to the workplace. Organizations that recognize, respect, and value their different viewpoints have leaders who are contributing to the financial growth of their organizations. American Black women have career capital to offer to organizations through their self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and the leadership strategies that they understand and apply in the workplace. In addition they bring high educational achievement, practical skills, and analytical abilities that are useful when leading others. They bring a persistent work ethic, support for education and leadership development, and an enduring spirit of cooperation in the midst of undeserved, personal challenges to the workplace. They solve problems, help others succeed, enhance the workplace environment and organization culture, and help their organizations maintain competitive advantage in an evolving global economy.
Executive leadership should lead the effort to enhance the role of American Black women within their organizations. Change begins at the top and integrating American Black women into executive leadership roles is a change initiative that must be strategically developed and managed through understanding who they are. This book provides a foundation upon which individuals and organizations can begin the change initiative through the use of the Five Values model as a career management system for developing and enhancing the careers of American Black women who are leading within and want to lead organizations.

Edited by Narelle Lemon and Susanne Garvis

This book is about a network of women who as a collective and individuals can share their stories to indeed help themselves as well as others. Our stories assist in the telling and retelling of important events. Reflecting on these events allow the ‘processing’, ‘figuring out’ and ‘inquiring’, leading to behavioural actions to change situations. The fact that we are women unites us as we have common elements with our roles both within academia, in our families, and in society.
The women in this study share their narratives in an open dialogue. Their journey into and out of academia is constructed from “a metaphorical three-dimensional inquiry space” (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000, p. 50). The space enables the authors to capture and communicate the emotional nature of lived experiences (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000). The self-studies explore the changes in social and contextual approaches that are attached to working and studying in higher education. The book provides a narrative of the “ups” and “downs” that female academics have individually and collectively encountered while moving “in” and “out” of academia.
Making these stories known establishes a sense of collaboration and community. This action serves to perpetuate and further develop the established pedagogy and look to improve practice. A community practice seeks to locate the learning in the process of co-participation (building social capital) and not just within individuals (Hanks, 1991). It allows females to come together to share experience and discuss ways forward.

Boys will be boys?

Bridging the Great Gendered Literacy Divide

Linda S. Bausch

"

This book addresses the issue of preadolescent boys literacy practices and the social construction of their identities as they navigate multiple classroom literacies. Exploring the role of the teacher, the role of multiple literacies and the way they “count” or do not count in the classroom curriculum through qualitative and quantitative findings, allows educators to rethink and reflect upon current instructional beliefs and practices.


As educators align their curriculum with the Common Core Standards it is imperative for them to consider how they will meet each students’ individual learning styles. Demonstrating growth across time through artifact collection, and analysis and teacher research inquiries, will demand that teachers release pre-conceived notions concerning gender and literacy practices.


At the end of each chapter there is a self-reflection as transformative practice, teacher research questionnaire that invites the opportunity to take what is shared in each chapter and apply it immediately to instructional practices and classroom environment decisions.

"

Career Moves

Mentoring for Women Advancing Their Career and Leadership in Academia

Edited by Athena Vongalis-Macrow

Mentoring and career guidance are the missing ingredients in women’s career planning at the higher education level. This book recognizes and gives voice to some of the common career concerns of women in higher education and responds to these through well informed, researched and experiential chapters focussing on interests specific to women in academia.
Career Moves is an international collection of book chapters that explore a range of specific issues that all women in higher education face or will face as they move up the career ladder. The book follows a career trajectory from new academics, middle academics and senior academics, in order to provide specific mentoring advice thatwill be useful, practical and essential for all women contemplating a career in higher education.

The book draws on the substantial knowledge, experience and information of successful women currently working in higher education. Each chapter presents strategic information for academics working in higher education who may be seeking insider’s advice about negotiating their careers. The authors, as ‘mentors’, reflect, discuss and offer critical learning to the readers. The aim is to help guide and shape women’s career moves in higher education.
In this international edition authors have given personal accounts of what works and how women could prepare for the next stages of their academic careers. Authors have given sociological accounts of obstacles and how these can impede women if they are not aware of strategies to overcome barriers. Insights about successful mentoring programs are highlighted to provide possible models for organizations.

Family Stories, Poetry, and Women's Work

Knit Four, Frog One (Poems)

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Sandra L. Faulkner

This book is a memoir in poetry about family stories, mother-daughter relationships, women’s work, mothering, writing, family secrets, and patterns of communication in close relationships. Faulkner knits connections between a DIY (do-it-yourself) value, economics, and family culture through the use of poems and images, which present four generations of women in her family and trouble “women’s work” of mothering, cooking and crafting. Family stories anchor family culture and provide insight into relational and family life. This work may be used as a teaching tool to get us to think about the stories that we tell and don’t tell in families and the importance of how family is created, maintained, and altered in our stories. The poetry voices the themes of economic and collective family self-reliance and speaks to cultural discourses of feminist resistance and resilience, relational and personal identities. This book can be read for pleasure as a collection of poetry or used as a springboard for reflection and discussion in courses such as family communication, sociology of gender and the family, psychology of women, relational communication, and women’s studies.
Nominated: National Communication Association Ethnography Division—Best Book 2015
Nominated: OSCLG Creative Expression Award 2015
Nominated: 2016 International Association of Relationship Research Book Award
Nominated: 2016 ICQI (International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry) Qualitative Book Award

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Edited by Monica Taylor and Lesley Coia

This edited volume gives explicit attention to the influence of gender, feminism, and queer theory in self-study of teacher education practices. It builds on the self-study community’s interest in social justice that has mostly been focused on race, ethnicity, gender, disability, and power, as well as broad conceptions that include multiculturalism and ways of knowing. This is the time to examine gender both because our community is growing and because of the reconceptualization of issues of gender, feminism, and queer theory in teacher education. This collection of papers provides a space for members of the self-study field, from founders to welcomed new members, along with the general community of teacher educators to problematize these issues through a variety of theoretical lenses. As always with self-study the impetus of the research is on the improvement of individual practice. Readers will find innovative approaches and insights into their own work as teacher educators.

Gender & Pop Culture

A Text-Reader

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Edited by Adrienne Trier-Bieniek and Patricia Leavy

A Sense Publishers Best Seller!

Gender & Pop Culture provides a foundation for the study of gender, pop culture and media. This comprehensive, interdisciplinary text provides text-book style introductory and concluding chapters written by the editors, seven original contributor chapters on key topics and written in a variety of writing styles, discussion questions, additional resources and more. Coverage includes:
- Foundations for studying gender & pop culture (history, theory, methods, key concepts)
- Contributor chapters on media and children, advertising, music, television, film, sports, and technology
- Ideas for activism and putting this book to use beyond the classroom
- Pedagogical Features
- Suggestions for further readings on topics covered and international studies of gender and pop culture

Gender & Pop Culture was designed with students in mind, to promote reflection and lively discussion. With features found in both textbooks and anthologies, this sleek book can serve as primary or supplemental reading in undergraduate courses across the disciplines that deal with gender, pop culture or media studies.

(In)Visible Presence

Feminist Counter-narratives of Young Adult Literature by Women

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Traci P. Baxley and Genyne Henry Boston

Current school systems create a generation of students who experience institutional practices that honor other students’ needs—those students who share the values of those with power—and have pathologized other groups, specifically women of color. (In) Visible Presence intends to contribute to existing pedagogy, which empowers students, teachers, administrators, and policy makers to develop participatory membership in schools and among citizens who can begin to create an anti-oppressive society. (In) Visible Presence contains a holistic, thematic approach to exploring young adult (YA) novels written by women of color, while providing cultural and historical contexts for interpreting and analyzing their work through a feminist lens. Unlike other scholarship, (In) Visible Presence uses a feminist theoretical framework to create a space in which select literary works offer counter-narratives that can be analyzed and critically interpreted according to principles and ideas intended to validate women, thus making their triumph over racism, sexism, classism, and heterosexism and equity challenges a visible cause relegating consequential change for both young girls and women of color. (In) Visible Presence maintains current discourse dialogue through a concentration on the intersectionality of gender, race, and class identities and how these identifiers serve as criteria for privilege and marginalization, even in YA literature.
(In) Visible Presence aims to explore YA literature written by women of color represented by African American, Asian American, Indian American, and Latina Americans. Our theoretical perspective focuses on the connection of race, gender, and class that is exclusive to women of color. The construction of “voice” and “space” is important for readers to hear from those once silenced.

On (Writing) Families

Autoethnographies of Presence and Absence, Love and Loss

Edited by Jonathan Wyatt and Tony Adams

Who are we with—and without—families? How do we relate as children to our parents, as parents to our children? How are parent-child relationships—and familial relationships in general—made and (not) maintained?
Informed by narrative, performance studies, poststructuralism, critical theory, and queer theory, contributors to this collection use autoethnography—a method that uses the personal to examine the cultural—to interrogate these questions. The essays write about/around issues of interpersonal distance and closeness, gratitude and disdain, courage and fear, doubt and certainty, openness and secrecy, remembering and forgetting, accountability and forgiveness, life and death.
Throughout, family relationships are framed as relationships that inspire and inform, bind and scar—relationships replete with presence and absence, love and loss. An essential text for anyone interested in autoethnography, personal narrative, identity, relationships, and family communication.

Scars

A Black Lesbian Experience in Rural White New England

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A. Breeze Harper

Scars is a novel about whiteness, racism, and breaking past the normative boundaries of heterosexuality, as experienced through eighteen year old Savannah Penelope Sales. Savannah is a Black girl, born and raised in a white, working class, and rural New England town. She is in denial of her lesbian sexuality, harbors internalized racism about her body, and is ashamed of being poor. She lives with her ailing mother whose Emphysema is a symptom of a mysterious past of suffering and sacrifice that Savannah is not privy to. When Savannah takes her first trip to a major metropolitan city for two days, she never imagines how it will affect her return back home to her mother … or her capacity to not only love herself, but also those who she thought were her enemies.
Scars is about the journey of friends and family who love Savannah and try to help her heal, all while they too battle their own wounds and scars of being part of multiple systems of oppression and power. Ultimately, Scars makes visible the psychological trauma and scarring that legacies of colonialism have caused to both the descendants of the colonized and the colonizer … and the potential for healing and reconciliation for everyone willing to embark on the journey.
As a work of social fiction born out of years of critical race, Black feminist, and critical whiteness studies scholarship, Scars engages the reader to think about USA culture through the lenses of race, whiteness, working-class sensibilities, sexual orientation, and how rural geography influences identity.
Scars can be used as a springboard for discussion, self-reflection and social reflection for students enrolled in American Studies, Sociology, Women’s Studies, Sexuality Studies, African American Studies, human geography, LGBTQ studies and critical whiteness studies courses, or it can be read entirely for pleasure.

Sexting

Gender and Teens

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Judith Davidson

Sexting: Gender and Teens provides a close-up look into the intimate and gendered world of teens and those who live with and work with them. The author draws upon interviews with teens, parents and caregivers, and many others who work with teens from teachers and youth workers to principals and police, we learn how the new digital world is still permeated by beliefs and patterns of earlier patriarchal structures. This three state study reveals there are significant gendered differences among teens in their perspectives on sexting, and these differences have implications for how to respond to the issue of teen sexting. Adults, too, demonstrate gendered differences in their views on teen sexting, and these differences have an important impact on the shaping of youth views about gender and sexuality.
As one mother said, “Girls set the pace, and boys notch the bedpost.”
Some key findings include:
The human curriculum of sexuality is both conserving and adapting, and these two impulses are always interacting.
We are in the midst of social and technological changes that have vast implications for all of our cultural notions, including sexuality.
Regarding sexting: Adults are pointing fingers in many directions and leaving adolescents to fend for themselves.
This compelling account—presented through the words of participants—provides a vivid introduction to hands-on social research that will be of interest to those in gender and women’s studies as well as the broader disciplines that touch upon these concerns, such as sociology, education, psychology, media studies, criminal justice, and other fields.
Sure to spark strong opinions and discussion, this book offers opportunities for sustained engagement with topics of critical interest to today’s digital world.

Conceptualising Women’s Working Lives

Moving the Boundaries of Discourse

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Edited by Wendy Patton

Theoretical work on the career development of women has travelled a journey from critique to creation. Early work responded to and criticised a literature that focused on theorising male roles in a workplace that was conceptualised as providing vertical career paths primarily for middle class males. More recently theorists are creating new constructions and frameworks to enable a more holistic understanding of career, applicable to both women and men. These constructions include broadening the discussion from women’s careers to women’s working lives.
This is the fifth book in the Sense Publishers Career Development Series. It features the vibrant work of contributors from around the world writing in the field of women’s working lives. It emphasises the need to explore theoretical connections and understandings in order to facilitate a more holistic and inclusive understanding of women’s working lives. The writers in the current volume acknowledge the changing roles of women, in both public and private spheres. Women’s roles in paid work are changing both in their nature and type of engagement. In addition, with an ageing population, women’s roles in care work are increasingly being extended from child care to aged care.
This book provides a history of theorising about women’s careers, in addition to presenting a focus on current empirical and theoretical work which contributes to understandings of women’s working lives. Its contributions both map the current discourse and challenge future work to extend the boundaries of that discourse.

Edited by Andrejs Kulnieks, Dan Roronhiakewen Longboat and Kelly Young

Our book is a compilation of the work of experienced educational researchers and practitioners, all of whom currently work in educational settings across North America. Contributors bring to this discussion, an enriched view of diverse ecological perspectives regarding when and how contemporary environmental and Indigenous curriculum figures into the experiences of curricular theories and practices. This work brings together theorists that inform a cultural ecological analysis of the environmental crisis by exploring the ways in which language informs ways of knowing and being as they outline how metaphor plays a major role in human relationships with natural and reconstructed environments.
This integrated collection of theory and practice of environmental and Indigenous education is an essential tool for researchers, graduate and undergraduate students in faculties of education, environmental studies, social studies, multicultural education, curriculum theory and methods, global and comparative education, and women’s studies. Moreover, this work documents methods of developing ways of implementing Indigenous and Environmental Studies in classrooms and local communities through a framework that espouses an eco-ethical consciousness.
The proposed book is unique in that it offers a wide variety of perspectives, inviting the reader to engage in a broader conversation about the multiple dimensions of the relationship between ecology, language, culture, and education in relation to the cultural roots of the environmental crisis that brings into focus the local and global commons, language and identity, and environmental justice through pedagogical approaches by faculty across North America who are actively teaching and researching in this burgeoning field.

Series:

Edited by Emily A. Roper

Designed primarily as a textbook for upper division undergraduate courses in gender and sport, gender issues, sport sociology, cultural sport studies, and women’s studies, Gender Relations in Sport provides a comprehensive examination of the intersecting themes and concepts surrounding the study of gender and sport.
The 16 contributors, leading scholars from sport studies, present key issues, current research perspectives and theoretical developments within nine sub-areas of gender and sport:
Gender and sport participation
Theories of gender and sport
Gender and sport media
Sexual identity and sport
Intersections of race, ethnicity and gender in sport
Framing Title IX policy using conceptual metaphors
Studying the athletic body
Sexual harassment and abuse in sport
Historical developments and current issues from a European perspective
The intersecting themes and concepts across chapters are also accentuated. Such a publication provides access to the study of gender relations in sport to students across a variety of disciplines.
Gender Relations in Sport has been nominated for the following awards:
Best Edited Collection in Popular and American Culture 2014 sponsored by the Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association
Susan Koppelman Award for the Best Anthology, Multi-Authored, or Edited book in Feminist Studies in Popular and American Culture 2014 sponsored by the Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association

Gendered Voices

Reflections on Gender and Education in South Africa and Sudan

Series:

Edited by Halla B. Holmarsdottir, V. Nomlomo, Alawia Ibrahim Farag and Z. Desai

Internationally, there is growing awareness that the target of Education for All by 2015 will not be met unless more strident efforts are made to improve access for marginalized, hard-to-reach children (most often girls). For almost four decades gender equality in education has been one of the key global concerns and as a result various organizations at national and international levels along with governments have initiated programs focusing on achieving gender equality, women’s empowerment and improving girls’ access to education. By focusing on access alone (i.e. gender parity) we may not understand how education can be used to achieve empowerment and influence cultural practices that are gender insensitive. In this volume we attempt to call into question the content of gender equality as simple parity and in doing so we reflect upon the following questions:
Do the global (macro) discourses on gender equality in education lead to a focus on numbers only or to more profound sustainable changes at the national (meso) level and the school (micro) level? To what extent have national policies been adjusted to reflect the global discourses on gender equality?
Are schools/classrooms (micro) expected to adjust to these global discourses and if so in what ways has this happened?
What are the challenges of providing access to good quality education for girls in both countries? Is there a dichotomy between the schools/classrooms on the one hand and the community on the other in terms of gender equality/equity?
To what extent is gender equality/equity imposed upon schools and communities and does it take into account the cultural practices in traditional communities?

Leaders in Gender and Education

Intellectual Self-Portraits

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Edited by Marcus B. Weaver-Hightower and Christine Skelton

Gender studies are a key lens through which education has been examined in the past forty years, having become an accepted and popular subfield in educational foundations studies. Moreover, scholars in gender and education have made tremendous contributions well beyond education, influencing humanities and social sciences scholars across the academy. Hearing the stories of these scholars—their development, education, important works, and thoughts on the future—offers unique insights into the genesis and growth of the field and gives new scholars an overview of advances made.
Leaders in Gender and Education: Intellectual Self-Portraits does just that, showing the history of gender and education through the eyes of 16 of its leaders. By recounting their experiences and scholarly work, they trace the development of feminist and profeminist research on girls, on boys, and on the issues shaping both gender and education—issues like race, sexuality, neoliberalism, globalization, and more. Importantly, the volume has a global focus, including scholars from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia. This diversity gives readers a broad sense of the progress of gender scholarship in education around the world.
Each essay provides students and researchers alike with not only background on the 16 scholars included, but also the lists of major works—chosen by contributors themselves—direct readers to some of the most important scholarship on gender and education. Taken together, further, the contributors’ thoughts on the future of the field provide glimpses of productive directions for studies of gender and education.

Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues

A Case of Social Justice

Series:

R.P. Clair

In Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues: A Case of Social Justice students from a liberal arts class help Professor Delta Quinn and reporter, Caleb Barthes, uncover the political and corporate story behind the scientific development and implementation of the zombie seed.
As the secrets of the seed are revealed, so are the secrets of Delta’s tragic past which explain her desire to study the sequestered stories of domestic violence, which may lead the reader to ask whether there is a connection between cultural violence and interpersonal violence, and more importantly, whether such knowledge will awaken the zombie in all of us.
Socrates’ oft quoted maxim—the unexamined life is not worth living—speaks to the current image of the zombie who walks through life without critically thinking, without addressing political issues, without participating in civil discourse or democratic entitlements.
Zombie Seed and the Butterfly Blues: A Case of Social Justice is meant to engage the college student, to have students address and discuss issues of relevance to society at large. For example, it can be read in sociology or communication classes that show the documentary “The Corporation.”
Whether in anthropology, business, communication, English, history, organizational communication, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, rhetoric, sociology or women’studies the novel is intended to provide a teaching tool to professors who are looking for new ways to awaken students.
The author is happy to discuss how you can use the book in your courses. Contact her at rpclair@purdue. edu.
Click here to view or download SAMPLE CLASS ACTIVITIES
Award Nomination: Outstanding Book of the Year Award 2013 from the Organizational Communication Division of the National Communication Association
The Teaching Gender series publishes monographs, anthologies and reference books that deal centrally with gender and/or sexuality. The books are intended to be used in undergraduate and graduate classes across the disciplines. The series aims to promote social justice with an emphasis on feminist, multicultural and critical perspectives.

Please email queries to the series editor at pleavy7@aol.com

But Don't Call Me White

Mixed Race Women Exposing Nuances of Privilege and Oppression Politics

Series:

Silvia Cristina Bettez

Winner! 2014 “Critics Choice Award” from the American Educational Studies Association (AESA).
Highlighting the words and experiences of 16 mixed race women (who have one white parent and one parent who is a person of color), Silvia Bettez exposes hidden nuances of privilege and oppression related to multiple positionalites associated with race, class, gender and sexuality. These women are “secret agent insiders” to cultural Whiteness who provide unique insights and perspectives that emerge through their mixed race lenses. Much of what the participants share is never revealed in mixed—White/of color—company.
Although critical of racial power politics and hierarchies, these women were invested in cross-cultural connections and revealed key insights that can aid all in understanding how to better communicate across lines of cultural difference. This book is an invaluable resource for a wide range of activists, scholars and general readers, including sociologists, sociologists of education, feminists, anti-oppression/social justice scholars, critical multicultural educators, and qualitative researchers who are interested in mixed race issues, cross cultural communication, social justice work, or who simply wish to minimize racial conflict and other forms of oppression.
Silvia Cristina Bettez teaches about issues of social justice and is an Assistant Professor of Cultural Foundations in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Culture of Ambiguity

Implications for Self and Social Understanding in Adolescence

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Sandra Leone Bosacki

Research shows that the ability to "read others" or to make sense of the signs and symbols evident in human communication has an influence on children’s self-conceptions and their social interactions in childhood and adolescence. Given that psychological explanations play a key role in teaching and learning, further research is required, particularly on adolescents within the school context. This book investigates which aspects of these discourse experiences foster the growth of understanding of spirit, emotion, and mind in adolescence. Accordingly, from a co-relational approach to the development of understanding mind and education, this book builds on past and current research by investigating the social and emotional antecedents and consequences of psychological understanding in early adolescence. Specifically, this book explores the question: How do adolescents use their ability to understand other minds to navigate their relationships with themselves and their peers within the culture of ambiguity? To address this question, this book critically examines research on adolescents’ ability to understand mind, emotion, and spirit, and how they use this ability to help them navigate their relationships within the school setting. This book might appeal to a variety of educators and researchers, ranging from early childhood educators/researchers to university professors specializing in socioemotional and spiritual/moral worlds of adolescents.

eleMENtary school

(Hyper)Masculinity in a feminized context

Scott Richardson

"Scott Richardson gives us a finely detailed experiential account of how gender and teaching are woven together in public schools. Through his own memories and the narrativized experiences of his research subjects, Richardson demonstrates both the institutional benefits associated with being male and the fragility of masculinity. Membership in the “Boys’ Club” of hypermasculinity requires constant checking, surveillance, and choices that fit within the narrow range of dominant masculinity (so well detailed by R. W. Connell). Richardson’s causal style parallels the ease with which men in leadership and teaching positions articulate their allegiance to gender norms and one another, and in effect, set critique of such gender norms above comment: it’s just the way things are done. "
- Cris Mayo, Associate Professor of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership & Gender and Women’s Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Faculty Director of the Odyssey Project; author of Disputing the Subject of Sex: Sexuality and Public School Controversies.

GIEE 2011: Gender and Interdisciplinary Education for Engineers

Formation Interdisciplinaire des Ingénieurs et Problème du Genre

Edited by André Béraud, Anne-Sophie Godfroy and Jean Michel

Attracting more young people, particularly women, in Engineering and Technology (ET) is a major concern in Europe today. Their participation in engineering occupations appears to be a key-issue for European economic and technical development, as well as a central achievement towards gender equality and social justice. Increasing young people’s interest in the sciences and mathematics and underlining the importance of Engineering and Technology developments in shaping our collective future is an ongoing project in the education sector. This book presents various analyses and ideas for possible solutions.
Aujourd’hui, attirer plus de jeunes et en particulier des jeunes femmes dans les formations d’ingénieurs est un souci majeur en Europe. C’est une clé pour aller vers l’égalité des sexes et favoriser le développement économique, scientifique et technologique de l’Europe. Accroitre l’intérêt des jeunes pour les sciences et la technologie est essentiel pour notre futur collectif et constitue un défi majeur pour l’éducation. Ce livre présente des analyses et des idées pour de possibles solutions.

The New Politics of the Textbook

Problematizing the Portrayal of Marginalized Groups in Textbooks

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Edited by Heather Hickman and Brad Porfilio

In an age of unprecedented corporate and political control over life inside of educational institutions, this book provides a needed intervention to investigate how the economic and political elite use traditional artifacts in K-16 schools to perpetuate their interests at the expense of minoritized social groups.

The contributors provide a comprehensive examination of how textbooks, the most dominant cultural force in which corporations and political leaders impact the schooling curricula, shape students’ thoughts and behavior, perpetuate power in dominant groups, and trivialize social groups who are oppressed on the structural axes of race, class, gender, sexuality, and (dis)ability. Several contributors also generate critical insight in how power shapes the production of textbooks and evaluate whether textbooks still perpetuate dominant Western narratives that normalize and privilege patriotism, militarism, consumerism, White supremacy, heterosexism, rugged individualism, technology, and a positivistic conception of the world.

Finally, the book highlights several textbooks that challenge readers to rethink their stereotypical views of the Other, to reflect upon the constitutive forces causing oppression in schools and in the wider society, and to reflect upon how to challenge corporate and political dominance over knowledge production.

Writing the Family

Women, Auto-Ethnography, and Family Work

Series:

Kathleen Skott-Myhre, Korinne Weima and Helen Gibbs

This is not a traditional book about the family. In a very essential way, it is a book about being a woman in relation to the current form of the family under capitalism in North America. The authors are three women whose interest in the family stems out of their own unique and varied experiences. The text is comprised of three autoethnographies that look at the family from radically distinct perspectives. Each section is rooted in the author’s own personal and professional life experience. The book explores multi-cultural family therapy, living inside a divorcing family, the role of child protective services, issues of class and race in a family’s identity, how media and pop psychology shape our view of the family, and what it is to be female in a patriarchal family system. All three women are currently working with young people in various capacities. Each section offers new ways to work together with young people to reshape the family so that it better serves those who live within it.
Cover photo by Zakk Malecha

Free Women (Mujeres Libres)

Voices and Memories for a Libertarian Future

Series:

Laura Ruiz

Free Women based their activities upon the dialog, the solidarity and the equality of differences. It was therefore a model for the social movements of the current dialogical societies of the XXIst Century, in which these elements basic are to overcome the social inequalities.
Free Women organization was created in the framework of the libertarian movement shortly before the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. It was one of the movements with greatest impact upon the lives of the worker and peasant women. More than twenty thousand women enrolled the organization, almost all of them young women, workers and with no academic education. They got organized in order to overcome what they called the triple slavery of the worker woman: slavery as a woman, slavery as a worker and slavery for the lack of opportunities to gain access to education.
They were the main actresses of the complete transformation of their own lives. They didn't only claim for labor and social equality, but they also transformed their personal relationships, love and the sexuality, contributing to the overcoming of a traditional masculinity model based upon power relationships and double standards.
Laura Ruiz is a researcher at the University of Barcelona.

Go Where You Belong

Male Teachers as Cultural Workers in the Lives of Children, Families, and Communities

Series:

Edited by Lemuel W. Watson and C. Sheldon Woods

The narratives in this book engage the reader and take him or her on a journey to understanding of what it means to be a male teacher who works in early childhood education or with young children. They passionately share of their challenges to be involved in children’s lives because they are called to do so; this work is part of their life purpose. Their narratives details interactions between the teacher and the day-to-day lives of students, parents, peers and supervisors while sharing what it takes to survive as a man in what is perceived, very often in our post-modern world as women’s work.
In the bigger scheme of things, the men teachers serve as cultural workers with their female peers to educate not only our children but our community and eventually ourselves about gender roles in our society and the need to have more role models during the first years of schooling. A fascinating book and a must read for parents, teachers, administrators, and other human service professionals who want to learn more about how to engage men in the lives of children.

Series:

Julie P. Torrant

The Material Family is a bold new reading of the family, focusing on “new” or “post-nuclear,” “flexible” family forms such as gay family, divorce-extended family, and transnational family. Reading across a range of texts from high theory to literature and popular films, the book crosses disciplinary boundaries to offer a highly innovative and dynamic approach to changes in gender and other family relations. Unlike most books in the fields of cultural and family studies, The Material Family provides an historical and materialist argument connecting the changes within family to underlying shifts in material, labor relations in global capitalism. The “post-nuclear” family is not only an affective space, Torrant argues, but one whose affects are themselves fundamentally shaped by class. The Material Family is a must-read for anyone who wants to venture beyond the surfaces of family life to the deeper-lying relations that have made the family and its new forms among the most important spaces of social life. Its readers will include not only students and researchers in the fields of education, cultural theory and cultural studies, women’s studies, sociology, and anthropology, but also general readers interested in understanding contemporary families and their struggles.

Voices of Resilience

Stigma, Discrimination and Marginalisation of Indian Women Living with HIV/AIDS

Pam O'Connor and Jaya Earnest

This book presents the results of a study that examined the multiple layers of stigma and discrimination experienced by women infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in a low socio-economic area of Mumbai, India. Using exploratory qualitative methods and underpinned by the psychosocial framework and gendered perspectives the study attempts to represent the voices of affected and infected women. The book first focuses on a global overview of HIV, presents data on the Indian context and provides a synthesis of HIV in relation to stigma, discrimination and gender. The second part of the book probes the depth of impact on women’s lives using the lenses of gender, economic status, the environment and physical health. The framework was further modified and extended to include threats revealed by and strengths indentified in infected and affected women. The analysis revealed that strategies to address stigma and discrimination need to address the social, cultural, religious and systemic barriers to changing attitudes. The book portrays the resilience of each woman’s spirit and the unique capacity of the women to cope, to find strength, to pursue life and to maintain hope when their dreams and the dreams of their children have been shattered through HIV/AIDS.

Black Feminist Thought

The Lived Experiences of Two Black Female Science Educators

Series:

Eileen Carlton Parsons and Felicia Moore Mensah