Browse results

Series:

Edited by Myint Swe Khine and Nagla Ali

Three dimensional or 3D printing technology is a process of making three dimensional solid objects from a digital file. Currently, low cost and affordable 3D printers enable teachers, schools, and higher education institutions to make 3D printing a part of the curriculum. Integrating 3D printing into the curriculum provides an opportunity for students to collaboratively discuss, design, and create 3D objects. The literature reveals that there are numerous advantages of integrating 3D printing into teaching and learning. Educators recommend that 3D printing should be introduced to the students at a young age to teach STEM concepts, develop creativity and engage in team work – essential skills for the 21st century work force.

This edited volume documents recent attempts to integrate 3D printing into the curriculum in schools and universities and research on its efficacies and usefulness from the practitioners' perspectives. It unveils the exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, theoretical and practical aspects of 3D printing in teaching and learning.

Contributors are: Waleed K. Ahmed, Issah M. Alhamad, Hayder Z. Ali, Nagla Ali, Hamad AlJassmi,Jason Beach, Jennifer Buckingham, Michael Buckingham, Dean Cairns, Manisha Dayal, Muhammet Demirbilek, Yujiro Fujiwara, Anneliese Hulme, Myint Swe Khine, Lee Kenneth Jones, Song Min Jeong, Jennifer Loy, Kehui Luo, Elena Novak, James I. Novak, Joshua Pearce, Dorothy Belle Poli, Chelsea Schelly, Sylvia Stavridi, Lisa Stoneman, Goran Štrkalj, Mirjana Štrkalj, Pamela Sullivan, Jeremy Wendt, Stephanie Wendt, and Sonya Wisdom.

Series:

Edited by Charbel N. El-Hani, Maurício Pietrocola, Eduardo F Mortimer and Maria Rita Otero

This volume of the World of Science Education gathers contributions from Latin American science education researchers covering a variety of topics that will be of interest to educators and researchers all around the world. The volume provides an overview of research in Latin America, and most of the chapters report findings from studies seldom available for Anglophone readers. They bring new perspectives, thus, to topics such as science teaching and learning; discourse analysis and argumentation in science education; history, philosophy and sociology of science in science teaching; and science education in non-formal settings. As the Latin American academic communities devoted to science education have been thriving for the last four decades, the volume brings an opportunity for researchers from other regions to get acquainted with the developments of their educational research. This will bring contributions to scholarly production in science education as well as to teacher education and teaching proposals to be implemented in the classroom.

Why Science and Art Creativities Matter

(Re-)Configuring STEAM for Future-making Education

Series:

Edited by Pamela Burnard and Laura Colucci-Gray

Why Science and Arts Creativities Matter is a ground-breaking text which significantly extends current understandings of STEAM and debates about individuation of disciplines vis-à-vis transdisciplinary theory. Drawing upon posthumanism, new materialism and enactivism, this collection of chapters aims to dwell further into the ways in which we come to know in relationship with the world. The text draws together a wide set of approaches and points of views to stimulate dialogue and awareness of the different ways in which we can extend the repertoire of human faculties for thinking and experiencing the world. A unique invitation is shared with readers to develop greater understanding of the contribution of education across the arts and sciences and to re-imagine our collective futures.

This book is a unique and timely volume that opens up several new lines of enquiry and arguments on STEAM education. It rebalances and readdresses the current emphasis in the literature around STEAM as another, newer opportunity to teach content. Instead, it brings a more specific focus on an entwining of contemporary theorists – putting theory to work – to extend the means for understanding and cultivating science and arts creativities, and make explicit key connections with the materiality of practices. This new go-to text offers a demonstration of how the latest research and theoretically engaged thinking (thinking through theory) on STEAM education can be put to work in practice.

Contributors are: Ramsey Affifi, Sofie Areljung, Chris Brownell, Pamela Burnard, Kerry Chappell, Laura Colucci-Gray, Carolyn Cooke, Kristóf Fenyvesi, Erik Fooladi, Cathy Francis, Lindsay Hetherington, Anna Hickey-Moody, Christine Horn, Tim Ingold, Riikka Kosola, Zsolt Lavicza, Elsa Lee, Saara Lehto, Danielle Lloyd, James Macallister, Caroline Maloney, Tessa Mcgavock, Karin Murris, Lena Nasiakou, Edvin Østergaard, Anne Pirrie, Hermione Ruck Keene, Ruth Sapsed, Diana Scherer, Pallawi Sinha, Margaret Somerville, Keiren Stephenson, Carine Steyn, Jan Van Boeckel, Nicola Walshe, Olivier Werner, Marissa Willcox, and Heather Wren.
The Biotechnology Learning Series is aimed to bring about discussion around the introduction of biotechnology in schools and tertiary learning environments. Biotechnology is an expanding area of scientific and community interest, one that it is important students understand because of its potential to impact on them and their communities. The development of scientifically and technologically literate citizens has been almost universally welcomed as a desirable goal for education and the introduction of biotechnology in schools can contribute to this. This series will include publications on communicating biotechnology, linking schools, industry and research, case studies of classroom research in introducing biotechnology, bioethics, futures and critical thinking in biotechnology. Although the context for the series is specifically biotechnology the publications will be useful to science and technology educators internationally. The Biotechnology Learning Series arose from research and development work for The New Zealand Biotechnology Learning Hub. The Hub was developed to make modern biotechnology more accessible to school teachers and students. The issue for teachers and science and technology educators is how to provide learning experiences in this area. The Hub funded by the New Zealand Government consists primarily of an on-line portal ( www.biotechlearn.org.nz) containing case studies and resources of biotechnology in action alongside teacher resources that demonstrate how biotechnology contexts can be transferred into a classroom setting to contribute to teacher and student scientific and technological literacy. The editors of the series encourage proposals from researchers in science and technology education.

The Language of Education

Key Terms and Concepts in Teaching and Learning

The Language of Education: Key Terms and Concepts in Teaching and Learning is a series of short handbooks each of which focuses on the special language inherent in a variety of educational disciplines. Those entering graduate programs, scholars from non-English speaking areas, teachers with interests in accessing the academic literature, and even those wishing to explore outside their discipline should find something of interest in these books. In short, these books support shared understanding by assisting all of those working with a particular discipline to share a common vocabulary and foster effective communication.

The featured terms in each volume have been selected for their relevance and their potential to be defined uniquely in a particular educational field. The key terms are discussed on one page with a short introductory definition for quick reference followed by a longer expanded discussion supported by references. The index in each book includes links to encourage readers to explore related terms and concepts and thus gain additional information and context. Those who are new to the academic language of a particular educational area, may find it useful to read the books in this series as if each were a collection of very short stories introducing that discipline.

Enhancing Science Learning through Learning Experiences outside School (LEOS)

How to Learn Better during Visits to Museums, Science Centers, and Science Fieldtrips

Sandhya Devi Coll and Richard K. Coll

The authors provide practical, research-informed, guidelines and detailed lesson plans that improve learning of chemical, physical, biological, and Earth & space sciences. The context for learning is the myriad of exciting opportunities provided by informal science institutions such as zoos, museums, space centers and the outdoors. Many such institutions seek to educate the public and inspire budding scientists. Visits outside school help students relate science to everyday life, providing strong motivation to learn science for all abilities. This book shows the key to making such visits effective, is when they are linked to classroom learning using a learning management system, drawing upon modern students’ fascination with digital technologies and mobile devices.

Jesuits and the Book of Nature

Science and Education in Modern Portugal

Series:

Francisco Malta Romeiras

Jesuits and the Book of Nature: Science and Education in Modern Portugal offers an account of the Jesuits’ contributions to science and education after the restoration of the Society of Jesus in Portugal in 1858. As well as promoting an education grounded on an “alliance between religion and science,” the Portuguese Jesuits founded a scientific journal that played a significant role in the consolidation of taxonomy, plant breeding, biochemistry, and molecular genetics. In this book, Francisco Malta Romeiras argues that the priority the Jesuits placed on the teaching and practice of science was not only a way of continuing a centennial tradition but should also be seen as response to the adverse anticlerical milieu in which the restoration of the Society of Jesus took place.

Attributing Excellence in Medicine

The History of the Nobel Prize

Series:

Edited by Nils Hansson, Thorsten Halling and Heiner Fangerau

Attributing Excellence in Medicine discusses the aura around the prestigious Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. It analyzes the social processes and contingent factors leading to recognition and reputation in science and medicine. This volume will help the reader to better understand the dynamics of the attribution of excellence throughout the 20th century.

Contributors are Massimiano Bucchi, Fabio De Sio, Jacalyn Duffin, Heiner Fangerau, Thorsten Halling, Nils Hansson, David S. Jones, Gustav Källstrand, Ulrich Koppitz, Pauline Mattsson, Katarina Nordqvist, Scott H. Podolsky, Thomas Schlich, and Sven Widmalm.

Series:

Edited by Nils Hansso, Thorsten Halling and Heiner Fangerau

Series:

Nils Hansson, Thorsten Halling and Heiner Fangerau

Series:

Edited by Nils Hansso, Thorsten Halling and Heiner Fangerau

Series:

Edited by Nils Hansso, Thorsten Halling and Heiner Fangerau

Edited by Jacqueline Leonard, Andrea C. Burrows and Richard Kitchen

There is a critical need to prepare diverse teachers with expertise in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) with the skills necessary to work effectively with underrepresented K-12 students. Three major goals of funded STEM programs are to attract and prepare students at all educational levels to pursue coursework in the STEM content areas, to prepare graduates to pursue careers in STEM fields, and to improve teacher education programs in the STEM content areas. Drawing upon these goals as the framework for Recruiting, Preparing, and Retaining STEM Teachers for a Global Generation, the 15 chapters contained herein highlight both the challenges and successes of recruiting, preparing, and sustaining novice teachers in the STEM content areas in high-need schools.

Recruiting, retaining and sustaining highly-qualified teachers with expertise in STEM content areas to work in hard-to-staff schools and geographic areas are necessary to equalize educational opportunities for rural and urban Title 1 students. High teacher turnover rates, in combination with teachers working out-of-field, leave many students without highly-qualified teachers in STEM fields. Most of the chapters in this volume were prepared by scholars who received NSF funding through Noyce and are engaged in addressing research questions related to these endeavours.

Contributors are: Lillie R. Albert, Cynthia Anhalt, Saman A. Aryana, Joy Barnes-Johnson, Lora Bartlett, Brezhnev Batres, Diane Bonilla, Patti Brosnan, Andrea C. Burrows, Alan Buss, Laurie O. Campbell, Phil Cantor, Michelle T. Chamberlin, Scott A. Chamberlin, Marta Civil, Lin Ding, Teresa Dunleavy, Belinda P. Edwards, Jennifer A. Eli, Joshua Ellis, Adrian Epps, Anne Even, Angela Frausto, Samantha Heller, Karen E. Irving, Heather Johnson, Nicole M. Joseph, Richard Kitchen, Karen Kuhel, Marina Lazic, Jacqueline Leonard, Rebecca H. McGraw, Daniel Morales-Doyle, Sultana N. Nahar, Justina Ogodo, Anil K. Pradhan, Carolina Salinas, David Segura, Lynette Gayden Thomas, Alisun Thompson, Maria Varelas, Dorothy Y. White, Desha Williams, and Ryan Ziols.

Beyond Nature Talk

Transforming Environmental Education with Critical and Queer Theories

Series:

blake m. r. flessas and Timothy D. Zimmerman

Camping Science Education

A Trip to Camp Wilde and the Queer Nature of Nature

Series:

Nicholas Santavicca, Jesse Bazzul and Stephen Witzig

Inviting the Mess

A Children’s Museum’s Transgressive Tactics for Unleashing Play

Series:

Anna MacDermut and Adrian Zongrone

STEM of Desire

Queer Theories and Science Education

Series:

Edited by Will Letts and Steve Fifield

STEM of Desire: Queer Theories and Science Education locates, creates, and investigates intersections of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and queer theorizing. Manifold desires—personal, political, cultural—produce and animate STEM education. Queer theories instigate and explore (im)possibilities for knowing and being through desires normal and strange. The provocative original manuscripts in this collection draw on queer theories and allied perspectives to trace entanglements of STEM education, sex, sexuality, gender, and desire and to advance constructive critique, creative world-making, and (com)passionate advocacy. Not just another call for inclusion, this volume turns to what and how STEM education and diverse, desiring subjects might be(come) in relation to each other and the world.

STEM of Desire is the first book-length project on queering STEM education. Eighteen chapters and two poems by 27 contributors consider STEM education in schools and universities, museums and other informal learning environments, and everyday life. Subject areas include physical and life sciences, engineering, mathematics, nursing and medicine, environmental education, early childhood education, teacher education, and education standards. These queering orientations to theory, research, and practice will interest STEM teacher educators, teachers and professors, undergraduate and graduate students, scholars, policy makers, and academic libraries.

Contributors are: Jesse Bazzul, Charlotte Boulay, Francis S. Broadway, Erin A. Cech, Steve Fifield, blake m. r. flessas, Andrew Gilbert, Helene Götschel, Emily M. Gray, Kristin L. Gunckel, Joe E. Heimlich, Tommye Hutson, Kathryn L. Kirchgasler, Michelle L. Knaier, Sheri Leafgren, Will Letts, Anna MacDermut, Michael J. Reiss, Donna M. Riley, Cecilia Rodéhn, Scott Sander, Nicholas Santavicca, James Sheldon, Amy E. Slaton, Stephen Witzig, Timothy D. Zimmerman, and Adrian Zongrone.

Series:

Edited by Lynn A. Bryan and Kenneth Tobin

Critical Issues and Bold Visions for Science Education contains 16 chapters written by 32 authors from 11 countries. The book is intended for a broad audience of teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and policymakers. Interesting perspectives, challenging problems, and fresh solutions grounded in cutting edge theory and research are presented, interrogated, elaborated and, while retaining complexity, offer transformative visions within a context of political tensions, historical legacies, and grand challenges associated with Anthropocene (e.g., sustainability, climate change, mass extinctions).

Within overarching sociocultural frameworks, authors address diverse critical issues using rich theoretical frameworks and methodologies suited to research today and a necessity to make a difference while ensuring that all participants benefit from research and high standards of ethical conduct. The focus of education is broad, encompassing teaching, learning and curriculum in pre-k-12 schools, museums and other informal institutions, community gardens, and cheeseworld. Teaching and learning are considered for a wide range of ages, languages, and nationalities. An important stance that permeates the book is that research is an activity from which all participants learn, benefit, and transform personal and community practices. Transformation is an integral part of research in science education.

Contributors are: Jennifer Adams, Arnau Amat, Lucy Avraamidou, Marcília Elis Barcellos, Alberto Bellocchi, Mitch Bleier, Lynn A. Bryan, Helen Douglass, Colin Hennessy Elliott, Alejandro J. Gallard Martínez, Elisabeth Gonçalves de Souza, Da Yeon Kang, Shakhnoza Kayumova, Shruti Krishnamoorthy, Ralph Levinson, Sonya N. Martin, Jordan McKenzie, Kathy Mills, Catherine Milne, Ashley Morton, Masakata Ogawa, Rebecca Olson, Roger Patulny, Chantal Pouliot, Leah D. Pride, Anton Puvirajah, S. Lizette Ramos de Robles, Kathryn Scantlebury, Glauco S. F. da Silva, Michael Tan, Kenneth Tobin, and Geeta Verma.

Series:

Mijung Kim and Wolff-Michael Roth

Science educators have come to recognize children’s reasoning and problem solving skills as crucial ingredients of scientific literacy. As a consequence, there has been a concurrent, widespread emphasis on argumentation as a way of developing critical and creative minds. Argumentation has been of increasing interest in science education as a means of actively involving students in science and, thereby, as a means of promoting their learning, reasoning, and problem solving. Many approaches to teaching argumentation place primacy on teaching the structure of the argumentative genre prior to and at the beginning of participating in argumentation. Such an approach, however, is unlikely to succeed because to meaningfully learn the structure (grammar) of argumentation, one already needs to be competent in argumentation. This book offers a different approach to children’s argumentation and reasoning based on dialogical relations, as the origin of internal dialogue (inner speech) and higher psychological functions. In this approach, argumentation first exists as dialogical relation, for participants who are in a dialogical relation with others, and who employ argumentation for the purpose of the dialogical relation. With the multimodality of dialogue, this approach expands argumentation into another level of physicality of thinking, reasoning, and problem solving in classrooms. By using empirical data from elementary classrooms, this book explains how argumentation emerges and develops in and from classroom interactions by focusing on thinking and reasoning through/in relations with others and the learning environment.

Stability and Change in Science Education -- Meeting Basic Learning Needs

Homeostasis and Novelty in Teaching and Learning

Series:

Edited by Phyllis Katz and Lucy Avraamidou

In this book the editors consider the resistance to change among teachers and learners despite all the evidence that science participation brings benefits for both individuals and nations. Beginning with biology, Stability and Change in Science Education: Meeting Basic Learning Needs explores this balance in teaching and learning science. The authors reflect upon this equilibrium as they each present their work and its contribution.

The book provides a wide range of examples using the change/stability lens. Authors from the Netherlands, Israel, Spain, Canada and the USA discuss how they observe and consider both homeostasis and novelty in theory, projects and other work. The book contains examples from science educators in schools and in other science rich settings.

Contributors are: Lucy Avraamidou, Ayelet Baram-Tsabari, Michelle Crowl, Marilynne Eichinger, Lars Guenther, Maria Heras, Phyllis Katz, Joy Kubarek, Lucy R. McClain, Patricia Patrick, Wolff-Michael Roth, Isabel Ruiz-Mallen, Lara Smetana, Hani Swirski, Heather Toomey Zimmerman, and Bart Van de Laar.

Series:

Edited by Tasos Barkatsas, Nicky Carr and Grant Cooper

The second decade of the 21st century has seen governments and industry globally intensify their focus on the role of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as a vehicle for future economic prosperity. Economic opportunities for new industries that are emerging from technological advances, such as those emerging from the field of artificial intelligence also require greater capabilities in science, mathematics, engineering and technologies. In response to such opportunities and challenges, government policies that position STEM as a critical driver of economic prosperity have burgeoned in recent years. Common to all these policies are consistent messages that STEM related industries are the key to future international competitiveness, productivity and economic prosperity.
This book presents a contemporary focus on significant issues in STEM teaching, learning and research that are valuable in preparing students for a digital 21st century. The book chapters cover a wide spectrum of issues and topics using a wealth of research methodologies and methods ranging from STEM definitions to virtual reality in the classroom; multiplicative thinking; STEM in pre-school, primary, secondary and tertiary education, opportunities and obstacles in STEM; inquiry-based learning in statistics; values in STEM education and building academic leadership in STEM.
The book is an important representation of some of the work currently being done by research-active academics. It will appeal to academics, researchers, teacher educators, educational administrators, teachers and anyone interested in contemporary STEM Education related research in a rapidly changing globally interconnected world.

Contributors are: Natalie Banks, Anastasios (Tasos) Barkatsas, Amanda Berry, Lisa Borgerding, Nicky Carr, Io Keong Cheong, Grant Cooper, Jan van Driel, Jennifer Earle, Susan Fraser, Noleine Fitzallen, Tricia Forrester, Helen Georgiou, Andrew Gilbert, Ineke Henze, Linda Hobbs, Sarah Howard, Sylvia Sao Leng Ieong, Chunlian Jiang, Kathy Jordan, Belinda Kennedy, Zsolt Lavicza, Tricia Mclaughlin, Wendy Nielsen, Shalveena Prasad, Theodosia Prodromou, Wee Tiong Seah, Dianne Siemon, Li Ping Thong, Tessa E. Vossen and Marc J. de Vries.

Thirty Years of Learning Environments

Looking Back and Looking Forward

Series:

Edited by David B. Zandvliet and Barry Fraser

This volume is a commemorative book celebrating the 30th Anniversary of the Special Interest Group (SIG) on Learning Environments of the American Educational Researchers’ Association. It includes a historical perspective starting with the formation of the SIG in 1984 and the first program space at the AERA annual meeting in 1985 in Chicago. This retrospective notes other landmarks in the development of the SIG such as the creation of the international journal Learning Environments Research.

The study of learning environments was first conceptualized around the need to develop perceptual and psychosocial measures for describing students’ individual or shared educational experiences (e.g. ‘feel of the class’ or ‘classroom climate’). Over the ensuing decades, the field expanded considerably from its early roots in science education to describe other phenomenon such as teacher-student interpersonal relationships, or applications in pre-service teacher education and action research.

The book also describes several new areas of promise for the expanding field of learning environments research that in the future will include more diverse contexts and applications. These will include new contexts but established research programs in areas such as information and communications technology and environmental education, but also in emerging research contexts such as the physical classroom environment and links among learning environment contexts and students’ emotional health and well-being.

Contributors are: Perry den Brok, Rosie Dhaliwhal, Barry J. Fraser, Catherine Martin-Dunlop, David Henderson, Melissa Loh, Tim Mainhardt, George Sirrakos, Alisa Stanton, Theo Wubbels, and David B. Zandvliet.

Without a Margin for Error

Urban Immigrant English Language Learners in STEM

Series:

Jeremy B. Heyman

In Without a Margin for Error, the author chronicles the journeys of young adults in an under-served urban community who are new to the English language into STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-related) fields from high school through college. He distills lessons, themes, and policy recommendations from the trails blazed by these students toward altering the status quo around college access and STEM success for often-marginalized but highly resilient young adults with much to contribute to their new nation, their communities, and the world. While drawing on a critical ethnography of over three dozen inspiring young adults, seven students are chronicled in greater depth to bring to life crucial conversations for redefining college readiness, access, and success in STEM fields.

Series:

Edited by Michele Hollingsworth Koomen, Sami Kahn, Christopher L. Atchison and Tiffany A. Wild

Towards Inclusion of All Learners through Science Teacher Education serves as an indispensable resource for teachers and teacher educators wishing to understand how to educate students with exceptionalities in science. This book begins with the voices and stories of the experts: current and former K-12 students with disabilities sharing their experiences in science education classrooms. The voices of students with disabilities are then connected to the work of leading experts in the area of science education for individuals with disabilities in an effort to address the goals of national reform documents by ensuring rigorous science experiences for all students. It is written in a highly accessible and practical manner, making it ideal for all educators including pre-service and in-service teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and curriculum developers.

Series:

Edited by Michele Koomen, Sami Kahn, Christopher L. Atchison and Tiffany A. Wild

Towards Inclusion of All Learners through Science Teacher Education serves as an indispensable resource for teachers and teacher educators wishing to understand how to educate students with exceptionalities in science. This book begins with the voices and stories of the experts: current and former K-12 students with disabilities sharing their experiences in science education classrooms. The voices of students with disabilities are then connected to the work of leading experts in the area of science education for individuals with disabilities in an effort to address the goals of national reform documents by ensuring rigorous science experiences for all students. It is written in a highly accessible and practical manner, making it ideal for all educators including pre-service and in-service teachers, teacher educators, researchers, and curriculum developers.

Edited by Aaron J. Sickel and Stephen B. Witzig

The improvement of science education is a common goal worldwide. Countries not only seek to increase the number of individuals pursuing careers in science, but to improve scientific literacy among the general population. As the teacher is one of the greatest influences on student learning, a focus on the preparation of science teachers is essential in achieving these outcomes. A critical component of science teacher education is the methods course, where pedagogy and content coalesce. It is here that future science teachers begin to focus simultaneously on the knowledge, dispositions and skills for teaching secondary science in meaningful and effective ways. This book provides a comparison of secondary science methods courses from teacher education programs all over the world. Each chapter provides detailed descriptions of the national context, course design, teaching strategies, and assessments used within a particular science methods course, and is written by teacher educators who actively research science teacher education. The final chapter provides a synthesis of common themes and unique features across contexts, and offers directions for future research on science methods courses. This book offers a unique combination of ‘behind the scenes’ thinking for secondary science methods course designs along with practical teaching and assessment strategies, and will be a useful resource for teacher educators in a variety of international contexts.

Drawing for Science Education

An International Perspective

Edited by Phyllis Katz

This book argues for the essential use of drawing as a tool for science teaching and learning. The authors are working in schools, universities, and continual science learning (CSL) settings around the world. They have written of their experiences using a variety of prompts to encourage people to take pen to paper and draw their thinking—sometimes direct observation and in other instances, their memories. The result is a collection of research and essays that offer theory, techniques, outcomes, and models for the reader.
Young children have provided evidence of the perceptions that they have accumulated from families and the media before they reach classrooms. Secondary students describe their ideas of chemistry and physics. Teacher educators use drawings to consider the progress of their undergraduates’ understanding of science teaching and even their moral/ethical responses to teaching about climate change. Museum visitors have drawn their understanding of the physics of how exhibit sounds are transmitted. A physician explains how the history of drawing has been a critical tool to medical education and doctor-patient communications. Each chapter contains samples, insights, and where applicable, analysis techniques.
The chapters in this book should be helpful to researchers and teachers alike, across the teaching and learning continuum. The sections are divided by the kinds of activities for which drawing has historically been used in science education:
- An instance of observation (Audubon, Linnaeus);
- A process (how plants grow over time, what happens when chemicals combine);
- Conceptions of what science is and who does it;
- Images of identity development in science teaching and learning.

Sci-Book

STEPS to STEM – Student Science Notebook

Aaron D. Isabelle and Gilbert A. Zinn

A “Sci-Book” or “Science Notebook” serves as an essential companion to the science curriculum supplement, STEPS to STEM. As students learn key concepts in the seven “big ideas” in this program (Electricity & Magnetism; Air & Flight; Water & Weather; Plants & Animals; Earth & Space; Matter & Motion; Light & Sound), they record their ideas, plans, and evidence. There is ample space for students to keep track of their observations and findings, as well as a section to reflect upon the use of “Science and Engineering Practices” as set forth in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
Using a science notebook is reflective of the behavior of scientists. One of the pillars of the Nature of Science is that scientists must document their work to publish their research results; it is a necessary part of the scientific enterprise. This is important because STEPS to STEM is a program for young scientists who learn within a community of scientists. Helping students to think and act like scientists is a critical feature of this program. Students learn that they need to keep a written record if they are to successfully share their discoveries and curiosities with their classmates and with the teacher. Teachers should also model writing in science to help instill a sense of purpose and pride in using and maintaining a Sci-Book. Lastly, students’ documentation can serve as a valuable form of authentic assessment; teachers can utilize Sci-Books to monitor the learning process and the development of science skills.

STEPS to STEM

A Science Curriculum Supplement for Upper Elementary and Middle School Grades – Teacher's Edition

Aaron D. Isabelle and Gilbert A. Zinn

STEPS (Science Tasks Enhance Process Skills) to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) is an inquiry-based science curriculum supplement focused on developing upper elementary and middle students’ process skills and problem-solving abilities characteristic of how scientists think and act. Students learn key concepts in seven “big ideas” in science: Electricity & Magnetism; Air & Flight; Water & Weather; Plants & Animals; Earth & Space; Matter & Motion; and Light & Sound. Using simple, readily available materials, teachers facilitate learning experiences using the following structure:
STEP 1: Investigate—Hypothesis—Test
STEP 2: Observe—Record—Predict
STEP 3: Gather—Make—Try

Once students complete a set of STEP activities aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards ( NGSS), they are ready to collaborate using a STEM Center. STEM Centers provide students with the opportunity for extended investigations focused on a single problem or “team challenge.” Students utilize science and engineering practices while collaboratively conducting research to gather information. Once a plan is made, the team attempts to solve the problem or complete the open-ended task. In addition, a Science Notebook or Sci-Book serves as an essential companion to STEPS to STEM; students maintain a written record of their completed activities which can serve as a form of authentic assessment. STEPS to STEM aims to help students find enjoyment in science and in the process of problem-solving—there are things to do, discoveries to be made, and problems to solve. Ideally, these experiences will lead to more explorations and questions about the world around them.

Art and Technology

The Practice and Influence of Art and Technology in Education

Edited by Luisa Menano and Patricia Fidalgo

The challenge of how to integrate art and technology in education faces educators all around the world. Approaches for addressing this challenge in ways that enhance the learner’s educational experience can be found in different cultures and in different disciplines. Embracing the idea of collaboration among art and technology educators and practitioners, was what Menano and Fidalgo proposed to the authors of the chapters in this book. This book presents ideas that help educators to re-evaluate and re-think how to approach art and technology in the educational setting and offers solutions to develop new experiences for students and communities.
Each chapter presents teaching practices and successful activities that address the challenges facing art and technology education professionals. Along with descriptions of the learners, the settings, the schools and the communities in which they work, the authors share their thoughts and concerns about the changing educational landscape around them. The authors are respected and experienced instructors who are engaged with the use of art and technology and each chapter reflects the authors’ diverse practices, their students at different educational levels, and the different educational and socio-cultural contexts in which the learning and teaching takes place. The authors hope that the varied approaches presented in this book will motivate educators to connect beyond the classroom as well as to embrace new strategies and think more creatively and broadly about educational practices.

Crossing the Border of the Traditional Science Curriculum

Innovative Teaching and Learning in Basic Science Education

Series:

Edited by Maurício Pietrocola and Ivã Gurgel

Nations worldwide consider education an important tool for economic and social development, and the use of innovative strategies to prepare students for the acquisition of knowledge and skills is currently considered the most effective strategy for nurturing engaged, informed learners. In the last decade especially, European countries have promoted a series of revisions to their curricula and in the ways teachers are trained to put these into practice. Updating curriculum contents, pedagogical facilities (for example, computers in schools), and teaching and learning strategies should be seen as a routine task, since social and pedagogical needs change over time. Nevertheless, educational institutions and actors (educational departments, schools, teachers, and even students) normally tend to be committed to traditional practices. As a result of this resistance to change within educational systems, implementing educational innovation is a big challenge.
The authors of the present volume have been involved with curriculum development since 2003. This work is an opportunity to present the results of more than a decade of research into experimental, inventive approaches to science education. Most chapters concern innovative strategies for the teaching and learning of new contents, as well as methods for learning to teach them at the pre-university school level. The research is focused on understanding the pedagogical issues around the process of innovation, and the findings are grounded in analyses of the limits and possibilities of teachers’ and students’ practices in schools.

Science Education

An International Course Companion

Series:

Edited by Keith S. Taber and Ben Ben Akpan

This book comprises a wide range of scholarly essays introducing readers to key topics and issues in science education. Science education has become a well established field in its own right, with a vast literature, and many active areas of scholarship. Science Education: An International Course Companion offers an entry point for students seeking a sound but introductory understanding of the key perspectives and areas of thinking in science education. Each account is self-contained and offers a scholarly and research-informed introduction to a particular topic, theme, or perspective, with both citations to key literature and recommendations for more advanced reading.
Science Education: An International Course Companion allows readers (such as those preparing for school science teaching, or seeking more advanced specialist qualifications) to obtain a broad familiarity with key issues across the field as well as guiding wider reading about particular topics of interest. The book therefore acts as a reader to support learning across courses in science education internationally. The broad coverage of topics is such that that the book will support students following a diverse range of courses and qualifications. The comprehensive nature of the book will allow course leaders and departments to nominate the book as the key reader to support students—their core ‘course companion’ in science education.

African Indigenous Knowledge and the Sciences

Journeys into the Past and Present

Series:

Edited by Gloria Emeagwali and Edward Shizha

This book is an intellectual journey into epistemology, pedagogy, physics, architecture, medicine and metallurgy. The focus is on various dimensions of African Indigenous Knowledge (AIK) with an emphasis on the sciences, an area that has been neglected in AIK discourse. The authors provide diverse views and perspectives on African indigenous scientific and technological knowledge that can benefit a wide spectrum of academics, scholars, students, development agents, and policy makers, in both governmental and non-governmental organizations, and enable critical and alternative analyses and possibilities for understanding science and technology in an African historical and contemporary context.

Being and Becoming Scientists Today

Reconstructing Assumptions about Science and Science Education to Reclaim a Learner–Scientist Perspective

Series:

Susan A. Kirch and Michele Amoroso

• Can I contribute to science?
• Do I like to work on the problems of science?
• How do scientists know what they know?
• Would I like to be|become a scientist?
These are questions that interest new science students.
The authors provide teachers with an approach to foster and answer these questions by concentrating on learners and learning. They argue that students are typically taught from a disciplinary perspective of science. Using this lens students are viewed as people who need to learn a particular canon of information, methods, and ways of knowing about the world—a perspective that may be useful for practicing scientists, but not ideal for young learners. In this disciplinary approach to science education there is little room for development as a scientist. In contrast, the approach championed by Kirch and Amoroso places learner questions about the world at the forefront of teaching and learning and treats science as a system of human activity.
The historical explorations, theoretical insights and practical advice presented here are appropriate for all ages and educational settings. In Being and Becoming Scientists Today, the authors provide: new tools for thinking about science, ideas for how to reveal the multiple stories of knowledge production to learners, and approaches to teaching science as a collective process rather than a series of contributions made by (famous) individuals. In these ways, the authors promote the idea that all science learners contribute to the science in our lives.

Chinese Dreams? American Dreams?

The Lives of Chinese Women Scientists and Engineers in the United States

Series:

Diane Yu Gu

Immigrant Chinese women scientists and engineers who study and work in the United States constitute a rapidly growing yet understudied group. These women’s lived experiences and reflections can tell us a great deal about the current state of immigrant women scientists in the United States, how universities can help these women succeed, and about China’s emergence as a global scientific and technological superpower.
Chinese Dreams? American Dreams? is the first ethnographic study to document migrating Chinese-born women scientists’ and engineers’ educational experiences and careers in the U. S. It historically situates these women in current political, economic, and cultural contexts and examines the successful strategies they employ to survive discrimination, advance careers, establish networks, and promote transnational research collaborations during their educational and career journeys in the U. S. This study makes a valuable text for students, researchers, and policy makers in higher education, women’s studies, science and engineering studies, as well as for faculty who teach future scientists and engineers. It also introduces new multicultural, intersectional, and feminist perspectives on these crucial issues of gender, ethnicity, nationality, and class, as they impact women’s professional lives.

Barbara S. Spector

How do prospective elementary science teachers think? This case study
reveals thinking patterns common to preservice elementary teachers;
identifies their behavioral characteristics while learning to teach science which are not commonly noted in current literature;
provides change strategies to accelerate preservice elementary teachers embracing the holistic, constructivist, inquiry/practice-based paradigm consistent with the standards set by the curriculum.
The chapters in this book immerse the reader in a sequence of episodes in this science methods course, and reveal the adventure of turning theory into practice while analyzing student-student/student-instructor interactions and their outcomes in an inquiry-driven, flipped classroom.
Strategies presented empower preservice elementary teachers to
implement national and state standards;
change science learning/teaching from “business as usual” to applying science and engineering practices in the classroom;
make cognitive and behavioral changes required to shift paradigms and eliminate science anxiety;
pass through stages of grief inherent in the loss of dominant mechanistic paradigm.

Series:

David B. Zandvliet

Education researchers worldwide face a basic question: Is their purpose to use people to develop knowledge, or use knowledge to develop people? This book offers an exploration to this fundamental question by examining what three core disciplines—ecology, economics, and ecumenism—have in common. These disciplines have roots in the ancient Greek notion of the household ( oikos). By examining some complementary and competing principles among the disciplines, the book uncovers some commonalities between science, economics and religion, that support a holistic view of ecology or ecological education. The format for the discussion comprises a number of selected academic chapters on each of the topics above as well as a number of other creative media which include drawings figures, prose, poetry and photography which creatively draws connections among the diverse and interdisciplinary concepts and theories presented. In addition, the content of this book has attempted minimize academic jargon to make the ideas more accessible to an audience of academics, teachers and a wider general audience.

Engineering Professionalism

Engineering Practices in Work and Education

Series:

Edited by Ulrik Jørgensen and Søsser Brodersen

The research presented in this book provides analytical frameworks and case studies on engineering practices in education and professional work. The studies are inspired by practice theory as well as science and technology studies. The contributions demonstrate how these practices mutually dependent in co-construction processes in different domains of engineering. In order to demonstrate these essentially dynamic features, the empirical material is aimed at unravelling the interrelatedness of educational and work practices in engineering and analysing them as inherently situated in order to understand how engineering professionalism is produced. The studies are motivated by the following questions:
How can we understand different engineering practices and how do they relate?
Which dimensions facilitate transitions between educational practices and work practices?
Where is engineering professionalism learned and the engineering ‘mindset’ constituted?
How does engineering professionalism change in response to societal challenges?
The studies focus on the responses to societal challenges in education and professional work settings. The outcomes show how engineering has responded to challenges concerning environment, energy, sustainability, design, user interactions, community engagement and entrepreneurship. This has been done through the identification of codes of meaning and the institutions that frame the translation from challenges to professional responses. How these responses are performed within engineering professionalism is crucial for the societal role of engineering.
The concluding chapter synthesizes the answers to these questions and the lessons learned from attempts to develop engineering in the different settings studied. It highlights the linkages among them, drawing on findings and details from the individual chapters as well as the literature in which they are situated, showing how the different sites interact and produce specific representations and frameworks central to engineering professionalism.

Yvette F. Greenspan

Nationally and internationally, educators now understand the critical importance of STEM subjects—science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Today, the job of the classroom science teacher demands finding effective ways to meet current curricula standards and prepare students for a future in which a working knowledge of science and technology will dominate. But standards and goals don’t mean a thing unless we:

-- grab students’ attention;
-- capture and deepen children’s natural curiosity;
-- create an exciting learning environment that engages the learner; and
-- make science come alive inside and outside the classroom setting.

This book: helps teachers develop curricula compatible with the Next Generation Science Standards and the Common Core Standards; provides easy-to-implement steps for setting up a science classroom, plus strategies for using all available resources to assemble needed teaching materials; offers detailed sample lesson plans in each STEM subject, adaptable to age and ability and designed to embrace the needs of all learners; and presents bonus information about organizing field trips and managing science fairs.

Without question, effective science curricula can help students develop critical thinking skills and a lifelong passion for science.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Yvette Greenspan received her doctorate degree in science education and has developed science curriculum at all levels. A career spent in teaching elementary students in an urban community, she now instructs college students, sharing her love for the teaching and learning of science. She considers it essential to encourage today’s students to be active learners and to concentrate on STEM topics that will help prepare them for the real world.

Human Rights in Language and STEM Education

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Edited by Zehlia Babaci-Wilhite

This volume explores the challenges of teaching and learning Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects in local languages and local contexts in a range of countries around the world. Many countries around the world, including African countries, have been largely excluded from the transformation that is going on in STEM pedagogy in the USA, where the emphasis is on the importance of language choice and the development of English Language Learner (ELL). STEM subjects in many parts of the world have been taught in a global language, mainly English, rather than using a local language and local curriculum. This creates pedagogical challenges to the teaching of STEM. The contributions to this book review evidence and arguments for the teaching of STEM subjects in local languages and several chapters make this case that this should be considered a human right, both in national educational programs and in development aid.

Inspiring STEM Minds

Biographies and Activities for Elementary Classrooms

Aaron D. Isabelle and Nataly Z. Valle

The purpose of this book is to serve as a supplemental reference text for 21st century elementary classrooms. The primary objective is to help teachers inspire and engage their students in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) subjects. The push for incorporating STEM education in elementary school has become increasingly important, yet most educators and publishers have offered problem-based activities, without considering one of the most important pedagogical entry points to lesson planning—the hook or the opening.
Inspiring STEM Minds aims at providing teachers an effective, easy to use text that they can use to discuss specific mathematicians, engineers, inventors, and scientists (although the individuals chosen for each section of the book are in no way an exhaustive or selective group that may characterize each discipline). This reference text is organized into four key sections, depicting the four disciplines that make up STEM education. Each section briefly gives historical background, as well as provides a problem or short activity designed to use everyday materials so that teachers can implement the activity in their classrooms. The classroom activities are directly related to each biography and have, we believe, great potential to engage students in the classroom. Each activity is also correlated to the National Standards, and we also supplement the activities with suggestions for interdisciplinary connections.

Series:

Edited by Marc J. de Vries, Lena Gumaelius and Inga-Britt Skogh

Pre-university engineering education has become the topic of increasing interest in technology education circles. It can provide content for the E in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education, which is in the interest of technology educators at different educational levels as it builds the bridge between them and the science and mathematics educators. In this book goals for pre-university engineering education are explored as well as existing practices from a variety of countries. The coming years will show if pre-university engineering education will catch on. The trend towards STEM integrated education that today can be seen in many countries will certainly create a further need and stimulus for that to happen. Hopefully this book can contribute to such a development of both formal and informal K-12 engineering education. Not only for preparing the next generation of engineers, but also for the technological literacy of future citizens.

Series:

Edited by Maarten C.A. van der Sanden and Marc J. de Vries

Science & technology education on the one hand, and communication on the other, are, to a large extent, still separate worlds and many opportunities for synergy and cross-fertilisation are yet unused. This divide is unfortunate, since educators need communication skills and communicators often use aspects of education in their strategies. Moreover, innovation processes in both domains ask for education and communication insights and skills. Therefore, scholars and practitioners in both domains must seek connections and synergy by exchanging insights and ideas. This book discusses the shared aims of science & technology education and communication, such as science literacy and engagement, as well as common processes and challenges, such as social learning, social design and professionalisation, and assessment. Aims, processes, and challenges that inspire, enhance and deepen the education and communication synergy from a theoretical and practical side. If one reads the various chapters and reflects on them from one’s own perspective as a scholar or practitioner, the question is no longer if cross-fertilisation and synergy are needed, but when are we seriously going to take up this challenge together. This book aims to initiate the dialogue that the situation in the development of the topic requires at this point.

Studying Science Teacher Identity

Theoretical, Methodological and Empirical Explorations

Series:

Edited by Lucy Avraamidou

The overarching goal of this book volume is to illuminate how research on science teacher identity has deepened and complicated our understanding of the role of identity in examining teacher learning and development.
The collective chapters, both theoretical and empirical, present an array of conceptual underpinnings that have been used to frame science teacher identity, document the various methodological approaches that researchers have implemented in order to study science teacher identity within various contexts, and offer empirical evidence about science teacher identity development.
The findings of the studies presented in this volume support the argument that teacher identity is a dynamic, multidimensional and comprehensive construct, which provides a powerful lens for studying science teacher learning and development for various reasons.
First, it pushes our boundaries by extending our definitions of science teacher learning and development as it proposes new ways of conceptualizing the processes of becoming a science teacher.
Second, it emphasizes the role of the context on science teacher learning and development and pays attention to the experiences that teachers have as members of various communities.
Third, it allows us to examine the impact of various sub-identities, personal histories, emotions, and social markers, such as ethnicity, race, and class, on science teachers’ identity development.
The book aims at making a unique and deeply critical contribution to notions around science teacher identity by proposing fresh theoretical perspectives, providing empirical evidence about identity development, offering a set of implications for science teacher preparation, and recommending directions for future research.

Series:

Edited by Ruurd Taconis, Perry den Brok and Albert Pilot

Context-based science education has led to the transformation of science education in countries all over the world, with changes also visible in learning environments and how these are being shaped. These changes involve authentic problems on research and design, new types of interactions within communities of practice, new content areas and also new challenges for teachers in teaching, motivating, scaffolding and assessing their students, among other things.
This book focuses on context-based science education and its resulting changes in the perspective of research on learning environments. It also focuses on the implications for the teachers and the professional development of their competencies and beliefs.
The book consists of eleven chapters by experts in various themes surrounding learning environments research and science education, preceded by and concluded with a chapter with reflections on context-based learning environments in science by the editors of this book. The conclusion they draw is that professional development of science teachers may be the most important and the most difficult part of the process of teachers creating context-based learning environments in science, as is the focus in the title of this book.

Understanding Girls

Quantitative and Qualitative Research

Series:

Dale Rose Baker

Understanding Girls: Quantitative and Qualitative Research is a retrospective of the author’s research that led to receiving the 2013 Distinguished Contributions Award to Science Education through Research. This book includes selected articles that document changes in her research approaches and theoretical frameworks. The articles represent the evolution of her thinking about the issue of girls in science as well as her impact on science education. The author’s work is placed in the context of science education research at the time of publication, research in education and psychology, and the culture of the times. She pulls back the curtain that often makes the messy work of research seem straightforward and linear to reveal why she did the research and the methodological decisions she faced. She describes the serendipitous nature of some of the work as well as her frustrations in trying to understand data, and struggles to insure that she accurately and respectfully presented the voices of girls and their teachers. The book also includes some of the earliest research in engineering education preceding the focus on engineering practices found in the Next Generation Science and Engineering Standards. Understanding Girls provides insights into why girls may or may not decide to participate in science and engineering and what can be done to increase their participation. It provides evidence that we have increased girls’ participation and the challenges that remain to insure that every girl who wants to become a scientist or engineer has the opportunity to do so.

What Can PISA 2012 Data Tell Us?

Performance and Challenges in Five Participating Southeast Asian Countries

Edited by Lei Mee Thien, Nordin Abd Razak, John P. Keeves and I Gusti Ngurah Darmawan

This is the first book regarding the issues of PISA that has been published with respect to the Southeast Asian region. It is hoped that the content of this book can benefit and provide greater understanding for readers of several important aspects: (a) country performance in PISA 2012 for each participating Southeast Asian country, (b) the need for international comparative studies from the perspective at all levels of the teaching and learning process, (c) equity and quality of education, (d) how PISA impacts on policy making, and (e) the initiatives and future directions, and challenges to improve PISA performance in the future cycles of the PISA Studies. The major issues raised in this book warrant investigation and reporting to all countries of the World, including not only those countries that were engaged in PISA 2012, but also to the approximately 200 countries that are currently in the United Nations Organisation.

Series:

Edited by Carolyn J. Boulter, Michael J. Reiss and Dawn L. Sanders

Charles Darwin has been extensively analysed and written about as a scientist, Victorian, father and husband. However, this is the first book to present a carefully thought out pedagogical approach to learning that is centered on Darwin’s life and scientific practice. The ways in which Darwin developed his scientific ideas, and their far reaching effects, continue to challenge and provoke contemporary teachers and learners, inspiring them to consider both how scientists work and how individual humans ‘read nature’.
Darwin-inspired learning, as proposed in this international collection of essays, is an enquiry-based pedagogy, that takes the professional practice of Charles Darwin as its source. Without seeking to idealise the man, Darwin-inspired learning places importance on:

active learning
hands-on enquiry
critical thinking
creativity
argumentation
interdisciplinarity.

In an increasingly urbanised world, first-hand observations of living plants and animals are becoming rarer. Indeed, some commentators suggest that such encounters are under threat and children are living in a time of ‘nature-deficit’. Darwin-inspired learning, with its focus on close observation and hands-on enquiry, seeks to re-engage children and young people with the living world through critical and creative thinking modeled on Darwin’s life and science.

Edited by Neil Taylor, Frances Quinn and Chris Eames

Education for Sustainability is a key priority in today’s schools, as our society seeks to find a balance between environmental, social, cultural, political and economic imperatives that affect our future. As young children will become the next generation of adults, it is vital that they are educated about sustainability issues, so that they can learn to make informed decisions and take positive action for a sustainable world. Teachers are ideally placed to educate for sustainability issues, and indeed have a responsibility to do so. However, they often lack support and experience in this area, and constraints of current curriculum priorities can inhibit Education for Sustainability being taught effectively in many classrooms.
Educating for Sustainability in Primary Schools: Teaching for the Future addresses this problem by showing how Education for Sustainability can be developed within and across all areas of the primary curriculum in the Australian and New Zealand contexts. The book provides a range of educational approaches and examples of activities to support teachers in addressing national requirements for teaching the major primary curriculum learning areas, while simultaneously educating for sustainability. This integrative approach to primary education can promote knowledge of, positive attitudes towards and suitable action for sustainability in relevant, meaningful, enjoyable and creative ways. This book is a valuable resource for all primary teachers who wish to make a real difference to educating children for the future.

Environment, Ethics and Cultures

Design and Technology Education's Contribution to Sustainable Global Futures

Series:

Edited by Kay Stables and Steve Keirl

This collection engages environmental, ethical and cultural values perspectives to show how Design and Technology (D&T) Education actively contributes to the significant educational goal of attaining sustainable global futures.
An international collection of authors representing all levels of education articulate how D&T research, curriculum theory, policy, and classroom practices can synergise to contribute positively to the education of children for sustainable global futures. The book offers a spectrum of theorised curriculum positions, political and policy analysis, and case studies of successful school practice.
A key word in the title is that of contribution which is construed in several senses: first, of D&T as a vehicle for understanding the range of political and social values that arise with such a major educational challenge; second, of D&T as an agent of critical and practical action for students as global citizens; third, by taking global and multiple perspectives (rather than, say, Western or mono-cultural positions); and, fourth, by demonstrating D&T’s capacities for working in holistic and integrative cross-curricular ways.
The authors show how students can not only learn about their potential as humans-as-designers but can also develop designerly capacities that enable them to contribute meaningfully in practical ways to their communities and to wider society, that is, as global citizens who can apply design capability in ethical ways that are respectful of peoples, cultures and environments alike.

Environmental Education in a Climate of Reform

Understanding Teacher Educators' Perspectives

Sylvia Christine Almeida

India is grappling with serious environmental issues that have been largely sparked by its galloping economy. As a measure of its seriousness to reduce the environmental impacts it has spearheaded numerous policy initiatives. One of the major thrusts of the proposed initiatives to curb environmental degradation has been to create an informed and well-educated citizenry. The federal mandates have triggered new curriculum policies and the compulsory teaching of environmental and sustainability education at all levels in all education institutions.
This volume examines the policy practice conundrum. It looks at how national and international policy reforms reach practitioners—in this case teacher educators. Furthermore, it unravels how teacher educators understand environmental education, the ways in which they negotiate its demands on their busy schedules, what helps them in determining relevant issues within this and finally how they implement these policies in their everyday practices.
It is evident from this book that while there have been some really well meaning development of policies, their impact on teacher educators’ practice, and therefore student teachers’ learning about Environmental Education is limited. The study showed that while these teacher educators had a clear understanding of the environment and saw the need/importance of incorporating Environmental Education in their daily practices they had very little scope to do so. There were numerous factors that constrained implementation.
The book provides inputs on global policy practice gaps. It offers valuable insights to a global audience grappling with understanding the ways in which environmental education policies are put into practice in emerging economies like India. The final argument is thesis that while policy reforms are a step in the right direction they need to be backed up with strong implementation systems in order to be successful.

Experiencing the Outdoors

Enhancing Strategies for Wellbeing

Series:

Edited by Margaret Robertson, Ruth Lawrence and Gregory Heath

The space is outdoors. The experience is personal and the journey can be solitary or take place in groups. Informal or formal the places visited are sites of learning. Locked in memory our experiences in the outdoors are a constant source of wonderment and food to replenish our sense of wellbeing. Our experiences in the outdoors can endure in the abstract as ideas for developing a sense of a well lived life. They can also draw us back to places and reenergise the body. Physical and emotional wellbeing collides in the unexpected events that flourish in the outdoors. Our readiness for enjoyment and personal development are subjective states which this book challenges. Traversing the landscape of the outdoors the collection of chapters contained range from the theoretical to the practical including strategies for teaching and learning that are transdisciplinary. With ideas for practitioners as well as thoughtful reading for readers of diverse ages and interests this book includes contributions from Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, United Kingdom and Canada.
Foreword by Peter Hay.

New Ground

Pushing the Boundaries of Studying Informal Learning in Science, Mathematics, and Technology

Series:

Edited by Karen S. Sullenger and R. Steven Turner

Between 2004 and 2009, university educators, practicing scientists, museum and science-centre personnel, historians, and K-12 teachers in Canada’s eastern Atlantic provinces came together as a research community to investigate informal learning in science, technology, and mathematics. The interdisciplinary collaboration, known as CRYSTAL Atlantique, was sponsored by Canada’s National Science and Engineering Research Council. In this volume, the CRYSTAL participants look back on their collective experience and describe research projects that pushed the boundaries of informal teaching and learning. Those projects include encounters between students and practicing scientists in university laboratories and field studies; summer camps for science engagement; after-school science clubs for teachers and students; innovative software for computer assisted learning; environmental problem-solving in a comparative, international context; online communities devoted to solving mathematical problems; and explorations of ethonomathematics among Canadian aboriginal peoples. The editors and contributors stress the need for research on informal learning to be informed continuously by a notion of science as culture, and they analyze the forms of resistance that studies of informal learning frequently encounter. Above all, they urge a more central place for informal science learning in the larger agenda of educational research today.

Newly Hired Teachers of Science

A Better Beginning

Series:

Edited by Julie A. Luft and Shannon L. Dubois

Supporting newly hired science teachers has taken on an increased importance in our schools. This book shares the most current information about the status of newly hired science teachers, different ways in which to support newly hired science teachers, and different research approaches that can provide new information about this group of teachers. Chapters in the book are written by those who study the status of beginning science teachers, mentor new teachers, develop induction programs, and research the development of new science teachers.
Newly Hired Teachers of Science is for administrators who have new science teachers in their schools and districts, professionals who create science teacher induction programs, mentors who work closely with new science teachers, educational researchers interested in studying new science teachers, and even new science teachers. This is a comprehensive discussion about new science teachers that will be a guiding document for years to come.

Planetary Praxis & Pedagogy

Transdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Sustainability

Edited by Richard C. Mitchell and Shannon A. Moore

A Practice-based Model of STEM Teaching

STEM Students on the Stage (SOS)™

Edited by Alpaslan Sahin

The STEM Students on the Stage (SOS)™ model was developed by Harmony Public Schools with the goal of teaching rigorous content in an engaging, fun and effective way. In this book, you will learn that the STEM SOS model is not only helping students learn STEM content and develop 21st-century skills, but also helping teachers improve their classroom climate through increased student-teacher communication and a reduction in classroom management issues.
There are at least two ways in which this book is innovative. First, you will find student videos and websites associated with QR codes; readers can use their QR readers to watch student videos related to the content in the chapter and see student e-portfolio samples at their Google sites. This provides the opportunity to see that what is discussed in the book actually happened. Second, the book is not about a theory; it is an actual implemented model that has evolved through the years and has been used in more than 25 schools since 2012. Every year, the model continues to be improved to increase its rigor and ease of implementation for both teachers and students.
In addition to using the book as a classroom teacher resource and guide, it can also be used as a textbook in advanced graduate level curriculum and instruction, educational leadership, and STEM education programs. Therefore, STEM educators, leaders, pre-service and in-service teachers and graduate students will all benefit from reading this book. Appendices will be one of the favorite aspects of this book for teachers who are constantly looking for ready-to-use student and teacher handouts and activities. Full handouts, including formative and summative assessments materials and grading rubrics, will provide an opportunity for teachers and curriculum directors to understand the ideas and secrets behind the STEM SOS model. Lastly, STEM directors will find this to be one of the best STEM teaching model examples on the market because the model has fully accessible student and teacher handouts, assessment materials, rubrics and hundreds of student products (e-portfolios including video presentations and project brochures) online.

Relevant Chemistry Education

From Theory to Practice

Edited by Ingo Eilks and Avi Hofstein

This book is aimed at chemistry teachers, teacher educators, chemistry education researchers, and all those who are interested in increasing the relevance of chemistry teaching and learning as well as students’ perception of it. The book consists of 20 chapters. Each chapter focuses on a certain issue related to the relevance of chemistry education. These chapters are based on a recently suggested model of the relevance of science education, encompassing individual, societal, and vocational relevance, its present and future implications, as well as its intrinsic and extrinsic aspects.

Science Education in the Arab Gulf States

Visions, Sociocultural Contexts and Challenges

Series:

Edited by Nasser Mansour and Saeed Al-Shamrani

The book introduces the development of science education in the Arab Gulf states and presents a critical analysis of current issues and concerns in educational research in science education. The key purpose is to provide some perspectives on the state of science education in Gulf and to share experiences with international scholars about the impact of the innovations and reforms implemented in science education in Arabian Gulf. But Science Education in the Arab Gulf States also intends to present new visions and to make suggestions and recommendations about the contribution of science education to prepare students in the knowledge age.
The volume is organised into three main sections. The first section addresses the current practices and challenges in science education in some of the Arab Gulf states. This section sheds critically the light on the challenges and problems that hinder or constrain the implementation of innovations in science education. The second section analyses the science educational reforms and innovations that are being implemented in the Arabian Gulf. This section presents experiences and research with using new approaches to teaching and learning in science classrooms in some of the Arab Gulf states. The third section discusses the socio-cultural issues that have impacted on shaping and reshaping the science education in the Arabian Gulf. This section focuses on exploring the socio-cultural factors that influence engagement and non-engagement in science education. It also explores how socio-cultural issues and contexts guide the reform of science education in the Arabian Gulf and presents various examples of how we can respond to cultural issues.

Scientific Literacy for Participation

A Systemic Functional Approach to Analysis of School Science Discourses

Erik Knain

Scientific literacy is approached on the premise that language is key to understand the nature of both learning and participation, in scientists’ practices as well as in liberal education for citizenship. Some of the questions that are addressed in the book are:

• What does it take to be able to participate in different arenas in society involving science?
• How does everyday language relate to scientific language?
• How can students’ texts be analyzed to gain insights into their learning?
• How can images be analyzed alongside verbal language?

This book offers a thorough introduction to key ideas in M. A. K. Halliday’s systemic functional grammar through examples and practical analysis. Detailed analysis is offered of science textbooks and curriculum documents, classroom talk, experimental work, and students’ discussions of complex environmental issues. Further, an analytical model guiding the design and analysis of science learning discourses is introduced.
The book starts with introducing excerpts from whole-class discussions, group work, experimental reports and textbooks as text-in-context. From this starting point, key aspects of language are carefully explained. The role of grammatical metaphor in the development of science knowledge is an important topic throughout the book. Tools for analyzing multimodal representations, intertextuality and multiple voices are also among the topics covered for understanding and analyzing school science discourses.

Alliances for Advancing Academic Women

Guidelines for Collaborating in STEM Fields

Series:

Edited by Penny J. Gilmer, Berrin Tansel and Michelle Hughes Miller

This unique book provides important guidelines and examples of ways STEM (e. g., science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) faculty and administration can collaborate towards goals of recruiting, mentoring, and promoting leadership to academic women faculty. Based on the experiences of faculty across five Florida universities, including one national laboratory, each chapter highlights one aspect of a multi-institutional collaboration on an NSF ADVANCE-PAID grant dedicated to achieving these three goals.
Highlighting the importance of coordination, integration, and flexibility, each chapter details strategies and challenges of establishing a multi-site collaboration, assessing climate in STEM departments, addressing differential institutional readiness and infrastructure, and implementing change. The authors suggest ways to build on intrainstitutional strengths through interinstitutional activities, including shared workshops, research, and materials.
Separate chapters focus on recruiting women into STEM departments, mentoring women faculty, and providing leadership opportunities to women. A theoretical chapter includes Cultural historical activity theory as a lens for examining the alliances’ activities and evaluation data. Other chapters present research on women STEM faculty, contributing insights about STEM women’s sense of isolation. Chapters include a reflective metalogue written by a social scientist. The book closes with lessons learned from this collaboration.

Cameron White

What is community? How important is community in the 21st century? Where might the idea of community “fit” in education and schooling, teaching and learning? These are the questions and themes embedded in this book. The general critique is that community is an add-on in our schools and often is dismissed as a result of the individualistic and competitive nature of schooling today. Our focus is to provide critical investigations as to the possibility of community—and that we need community now more than ever!
The concept of community education brings many ideas and issues to mind. Related themes include place-based, field-based, environmental, service learning, and outdoor education. Each has its own more narrow focus with community education perhaps an umbrella term than encompasses them all. Nevertheless, the suggestion here is that instead of community education serving as an extension or add-on to traditional approaches, it should be the focus of all education.
What is often missing in teaching and learning are contexts and connections than make education meaningful. Community education engages participants in problem and issues-based approaches to the local community, thereby facilitating that local to global link. Instead of compartmentalized subjects, integrated approaches use what students and the community know or understand to develop further questions, solutions, or even problems. Community education offers efficacy in that it provides opportunities for collaboration in addressing local issues and problems. It enables the community to become the classroom, thus ensuring a more long-term connection to active rather than passive endeavors as citizens.

A Few of Our Favorite Things

Teaching Ideas for K-12 Science Methods Instructors

Edited by Patricia D. Morrell and Kate Popejoy

We are all familiar with the expression “teachers’ bag of tricks.” It is fairly easy for K-12 teachers to do a quick web search, scan library shelves, and browse through journals to provide them with numerous lessons and ideas to keep their bags filled.
Science teacher educators need to not only provide preservice teachers with resources to help them fill their “bags,” but also include crucial theory and pedagogy; what constitutes “minds on” lessons, not merely “hands on” activities.
But where do we science methods instructors find ideas to put in our “bag of tricks” to help us with the pedagogy we teach and model? These kinds of teaching ideas are not so easy to find using the internet or even science methods textbooks. This book is a collection of some favorite teaching ideas from science teacher educators from across the United States and abroad. This book is NOT a collection of teaching ideas about specific science content. This book IS a set of activities that help us prepare our preservice science teachers in the areas of: Constructivism/Conceptual Change; Nature of Science; Integration (including Technology Integration), Scientific Inquiry/Engineering Design; and Diversity/Differentiation.
Each section starts with a brief overview of the topic and an introduction to the activities included on the theme. The individual activities include step-by-step instructions, modifications/extensions, references, and additional readings to help you easily and fully implement the idea in your own classroom.
These ideas are a few of our favorites; we hope they will become some of yours as well.

The Language of Science Education

An Expanded Glossary of Key Terms and Concepts in Science Teaching and Learning

Edited by William F. McComas

The Language of Science Education: An Expanded Glossary of Key Terms and Concepts in Science Teaching and Learning is written expressly for science education professionals and students of science education to provide the foundation for a shared vocabulary of the field of science teaching and learning. Science education is a part of education studies but has developed a unique vocabulary that is occasionally at odds with the ways some terms are commonly used both in the field of education and in general conversation. Therefore, understanding the specific way that terms are used within science education is vital for those who wish to understand the existing literature or make contributions to it. The Language of Science Education provides definitions for 100 unique terms, but when considering the related terms that are also defined as they relate to the targeted words, almost 150 words are represented in the book. For instance, “laboratory instruction” is accompanied by definitions for openness, wet lab, dry lab, virtual lab and cookbook lab. Each key term is defined both with a short entry designed to provide immediate access following by a more extensive discussion, with extensive references and examples where appropriate. Experienced readers will recognize the majority of terms included, but the developing discipline of science education demands the consideration of new words. For example, the term blended science is offered as a better descriptor for interdisciplinary science and make a distinction between project-based and problem-based instruction. Even a definition for science education is included. The Language of Science Education is designed as a reference book but many readers may find it useful and enlightening to read it as if it were a series of very short stories.
Cover photo:
The cover photo was taken by W. F. McComas at Marsh’s Library in Dublin, Ireland. This amazing library houses more than 25, 000 rare and important books including many related to the history of science. It was founded in 1701 and has remained essentially unchanged for three centuries. Permission to use this image as the cover for The Language of Science Education has been granted by Dr. Jason McElligott, Keeper of Marsh’s Library.

Series:

Darren O'Hern and Yoshiko Nozaki

Through a multi-sited qualitative study of three Kenyan secondary schools in rural Taita Hills and urban Nairobi, the volume explores the ways the dichotomy between “Western” and “indigenous” knowledge operates in Kenyan education. In particular, it examines views on natural sciences expressed by the students, teachers, the state’s curricula documents, and schools’ exam-oriented pedagogical approaches. O’Hern and Nozaki question state and local education policies and practices as they relate to natural science subjects such as agriculture, biology, and geography and their dismissal of indigenous knowledge about environment, nature, and sustainable development. They suggest the need to develop critical postcolonial curriculum policies and practices of science education to overcome knowledge-oriented binaries, emphasize sustainable development, and address the problems of inequality, the center and periphery divide, and social, cultural, and environmental injustices in Kenya and, by implication, elsewhere.

Series:

Lawrence Baines

Turn your students into scientists who use their knowledge and creativity to solve real-world problems. Each lesson features a step-by-step guide; a summary of recent research; and handouts that are classroom-ready.

Learn about the three levels of writing, from a Level 1 quickwrite to a formal, multi-part, Level 3 research paper. Each writing assignment—narrative, persuasive, and informative—includes a detailed rubric that makes grading easy.

Students collaborate to contain an outbreak of avian flu, lead a group of people trying to survive under harsh conditions, battle drought in a densely-populated city in the American southwest, research the behavior of animals in the local region, and calculate their own speed, velocity, and momentum.

Engaging and demanding, Project-Based Writing in Science helps students to understand and improve the world.

Robert Mayes and James Myers

This book provides professional development leaders and teachers with a framework for integrating authentic real-world performance tasks into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) classrooms. We incorporate elements of problem-based learning to engage students around grand challenges in energy and environment, place-based leaning to motivate students by relating the problem to their community, and Understanding by Design to ensure that understanding key concepts in STEM is the outcome. Our framework has as a basic tenet interdisciplinary STEM approaches to studying real-world problems. We invited professional learning communities of science and mathematics teachers to bring multiple lenses to the study of these problems, including the sciences of biology, chemistry, earth systems and physics, technology through data collection tools and computational science modeling approaches, engineering design around how to collect data, and mathematics through quantitative reasoning. Our goal was to have teachers create opportunities for their students to engage in real-world problems impacting their place; problems that could be related to STEM grand challenges demonstrating the importance and utility of STEM. We want to broaden the participation of students in STEM, which both increases the future STEM workforce, providing our next generation of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians, as well as producing a STEM literate citizenry that can make informed decisions about grand challenges that will be facing their generation. While we provide a specific example of an interdisciplinary STEM module, we hope to do more than provide a single fish. Rather we hope to teach you how to fish so you can create modules that will excite your students.

Edited by Robert H. Evans, Julie A. Luft, Charlene M. Czerniak and Celestine H. Pea

This book provides science teacher educators and science educational researchers with a current overview on the roles of beliefs in science education settings. There are four focal areas in the book: an overview of this field of research, lines of research, implications for policy, and implications for educators. Within each of these areas there are specific explorations that examine important areas such as, the roles of beliefs in teaching and learning, the impact of beliefs on student achievement, and ways in which beliefs are connected to teacher actions in the classroom. Throughout all of these discussions, there is a focus on international perspectives. Those reading this book can use the research presented to consider how to confront, challenge, and cultivate beliefs during the teacher professional development process.

Successful Teacher Education

Partnerships, Reflective Practice and the Place of Technology

Edited by Mellita Jones and Josephine Ryan

This volume presents distinctive, innovative models of teacher education from Australia, discusses their successful elements and considers possibilities for successful teacher education in the twenty-first century. Each model is couched within the international teacher education concerns of the theory practice nexus, school-university partnerships, reflective practice, and the role of technology. The contributing authors, drawn from different contexts and locations around Australia, each offers research-based perspectives on successful teacher education. Responses to teacher education challenges in rural and regional contexts, metropolitan areas, among low socio-economic populations and Indigenous communities are considered. Ways in which technology, and in particular mobile technology, can be used to support learning across these diverse contexts are illustrated, as is the role of reflective practice to encourage critical reflection for improving teacher learning. Collectively, the authors present a range of directions that can guide the future of teacher education both nationally and internationally, demonstrating that context, partnerships, reflection and technology are critical elements in the provision of successful teacher education.

Transforming Urban Education

Urban Teachers and Students Working Collaboratively

Series:

Edited by Kenneth Tobin and Ashraf Shady

Transformations in Urban Education: Urban Teachers and Students Working Collaboratively addresses pressing problems in urban education, contextualized in research in New York City and nearby school districts on the Northeast Coast of the United States. The schools and institutions involved in empirical studies range from elementary through college and include public and private schools, alternative schools for dropouts, and museums. Difference is regarded as a resource for learning and equity issues are examined in terms of race, ethnicity, language proficiency, designation as special education, and gender. The contexts for research on teaching and learning involve science, mathematics, uses of technology, literacy, and writing comic books. A dual focus addresses research on teaching and learning, and learning to teach in urban schools.
Collaborative activities addressed explicitly are teachers and students enacting roles of researchers in their own classrooms, cogenerative dialogues as activities to allow teachers and students to learn about one another’s cultures and express their perspectives on their experienced realities and negotiate shared recommendations for changes to enacted curricula. Coteaching is also examined as a means of learning to teach, teaching and learning, and undertaking research.
The scholarship presented in the constituent chapters is diverse, reflecting multi-logicality within sociocultural frameworks that include cultural sociology, cultural historical activity theory, prosody, sense of place, and hermeneutic phenomenology. Methodologies employed in the research include narratology, interpretive, reflexive, and authentic inquiry, and multi-level inquiries of video resources combined with interpretive analyses of social artifacts selected from learning environments.
This edited volume provides insights into research of places in which social life is enacted as if there were no research being undertaken. The research was intended to improve practice. Teachers and learners, as research participants, were primarily concerned with teaching and learning and, as a consequence, as we learned from research participants were made aware of what we learned—the purpose being to improve learning environments. Accordingly, research designs are contingent on what happens and emergent in that what we learned changed what happened and expanded possibilities to research and learn about transformation through heightening participants’ awareness about possibilities for change and developing interventions to improve learning.

Series:

Edited by Katerina Plakitsi

The purpose of this book is to establish a broader context for rethinking science learning and teaching by using cultural historical activity theoretic approach. Activity theory already steps in its third generation and only a few works have been done on its applications to science education, especially in Europe. The context takes into account more recent developments in activity theory applications in US, Canada, Australia and Europe. The chapters articulate new ways of thinking about learning and teaching science i.e., new theoretical perspectives and some case studies of teaching important scientific topics in/for compulsory education. The ultimate purpose of each chapter and the collective book as a whole is to prepare the ground upon which a new pedagogy in science education can be emerged to provide more encompassing theoretical frameworks that allow us to capture the complexity of science learning and teaching as it occurs in and out-of schools. The book captures the dialogic and interactive nature of the transferring the activity theory to both formal and informal science education. It also contributes to the development of innovative curricula, school science textbooks, educational programs and ICT’s materials. As a whole, the book moves theorizing and practicing of science education into new face and uncharted terrain. It is recommended to new scholars and researchers as well as teachers/researchers.

Edited by Russell Tytler, Vaughan Prain, Peter Hubber and Bruce Waldrip

Current research into student learning in science has shifted attention from the traditional cognitivist perspectives of conceptual change to socio-cultural and semiotic perspectives that characterize learning in terms of induction into disciplinary literacy practices. This book builds on recent interest in the role of representations in learning to argue for a pedagogical practice based on students actively generating and exploring representations. The book describes a sustained inquiry in which the authors worked with primary and secondary teachers of science, on key topics identified as problematic in the research literature. Data from classroom video, teacher interviews and student artifacts were used to develop and validate a set of pedagogical principles and explore student learning and teacher change issues. The authors argue the theoretical and practical case for a representational focus. The pedagogical approach is illustrated and explored in terms of the role of representation to support quality student learning in science. Separate chapters address the implications of this perspective and practice for structuring sequences around different concepts, reasoning and inquiry in science, models and model based reasoning, the nature of concepts and learning, teacher change, and assessment. The authors argue that this representational focus leads to significantly enhanced student learning, and has the effect of offering new and productive perspectives and approaches for a number of contemporary strands of thinking in science education including conceptual change, inquiry, scientific literacy, and a focus on the epistemic nature of science.

Series:

Edited by David B. Zandvliet

This book describes and documents one school’s experiences in achieving their environmental literacy goals through the development of a place-based learning environment. Through this initiative, a longitudinal, descriptive case study began at the Bowen Island Community School to both support and advocate for ecological literacy, while helping the school realize its broad environmental learning goals.
Conceptualised as an intensive case study of a learning environment (with an environmental education focus), the program was part of a larger ecological literacy project conducted in association with preservice and graduate education programs at a nearby university and research centre. Following both (empirical) learning environments and participatory (ethnographic) research methods, the project is described from a variety of perspectives: students, teachers, teacher educators, researchers and administrators.
The volume describes a variety of forms of place-based education that teachers devised and implemented at the school while giving evidence of the development of a supportive and positive place-based learning environment. The programs and initiatives described in this volume provide the reader with insights for the development of place-based programming more generally. The final chapter outlines participatory methods and action research efforts used to evaluate the success of the project and recounts the development and validation of a learning environment instrument to assist with this process. The new instrument coupled with qualitative descriptions of the learning environment experienced by many at the school give unique insights into the various ways the study of learning environments (as a methodology) may be explored.

Expanding Notions of Assessment for Learning

Inside Science and Technology Primary Classrooms

Bronwen Cowie, Judy Moreland and Kathrin Otrel-Cass

Assessment for learning (AfL) is bound up with students becoming autonomous lifelong learners who are active participants in the classroom and beyond. This book explores teacher and student experiences of AfL interactions in primary science and technology classrooms. Working from a sociocultural perspective, the book’s fundamental premise is that AfL has a contribution to make to students developing identities as accomplished learners and knowers. The focus is on understanding and enhancing teacher practices that align with the spirit of AfL. The following points are illustrated:
• AfL interactions are multifaceted, multimodal and take place over multiple time scales. • Student learning autonomy is promoted when teachers provide opportunities for students to exercise agency within a system of accountabilities. • Teacher pedagogical content knowledge plays a pivotal role in teachers being able to respond to students. • Productive AfL interactions are reflective of the way a particular discipline generates and warrants knowledge.
The book will be of interest to teachers and educational researchers who want to examine AfL from a theoretical and a practical perspective.

Series:

Hedy Moscovici, Penny J. Gilmer and Katherine C. Wieseman

Dr. Hedy Moscovici’s life on three continents and her battle with ovarian cancer shaped the unique co-learning and participative leadership perspective on science and mathematics education shared in this book. This text has multiple audiences—prospective and practicing teachers wanting to motivate their students to learn, science and mathematics educators mentoring teachers to become transformative intellectuals and critical pedagogues, parents interested in their children’s advancement, and interested policymakers and public wishing to deepen their understanding about learning in general and educational issues in science and mathematics. Two mottos, “I can’t learn from you if you can’t learn from me” and “to teach is to learn twice,” summarize the essence of her message. The spotlight is on the critical interdependence of factors, specifically human ability to construct understanding; necessity of disequilibrium to spark neural rewiring; cognition-emotion (pleasure vs. pain, even science or math phobia) connections; sociocultural context; dilemma created by the absence of a clearly trustworthy “learning meter” for a society valuing objective measurement of quality of learning; human relationships sustained by three R’s (rights, responsibilities, respect); and, heightened awareness of power relationships leading to a spirit of collaboration, recognition of each individual’s strengths and expertise; and critical pedagogy.