Browse results

This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.
Institutional leadership in higher education today requires the management of academic, financial and human resources to deliver teaching, research, external engagement, IT, student support, quality assurance, and estate management activities at levels ranging from local to global. This requires the development and deployment of subject expertise, diplomacy as well as a whole range of practical and technical skills. It can be difficult to balance the strategic needs of the institution with its practical, day-to-day management.

Drawing on more than 60 years of higher education experience around the world, the authors set out the fundamental elements of all higher education institutions and place them in a practical framework to enable leaders to understand their institutions more clearly, and develop appropriate responses to the unique issues that arise in each.

Accessible, insightful, comprehensive and universally applicable, An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education draws on numerous real-world examples and offers practical exercises to enable institutional leaders to understand how their institutions actually work, to develop appropriate responses to the issues that confront them and to manage their institutions more effectively.
Theory, Development, Instruction, and Assessment
The Partnership for 21st Century Skills states that critical thinking encompasses skills that students and professionals will need to succeed in their careers, school, and life. The demand for critical thinkers will increase in the future to meet the demands of world-wide problems. Educators need to show students how to eliminate errors, such as biases in their reasoning, and to be effective decision makers. To do this, teachers and leaders in schools and businesses need to provide an atmosphere conducive to developing critical thinking skills and dispositions.

Meeting this challenge is the goal of the chapters collected in Critical Thinking and Reasoning. This book begins with experts laying out their best current understanding of the skills and attitudes critical thinking requires. Next, the relationship between critical thinking and the psychology of development and learning is explored to understand better how to develop critical thinkers from childhood to adulthood.

But how can we best teach for critical thinking? How can we incorporate into the classroom the challenges presented in the workplace? This book provides several extensive examples of current practices from the elementary level through the secondary level to the university level of how to stimulate critical thinking skills and dispositions.
International Educationalist Perspectives
Volume Editor: Brent Bradford
The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives assembles a collective narrative related to the doctoral journey of recent graduates in the field of education. Clearly, the doctoral journey is not a linear process but rather a lattice of ever-evolving professional and personal relationships, experiences, perspectives, and insights.

From early on when considering whether or not to apply to a programme, to deciding on an institution and supervisor, to delving into the related literature, to data collection and analyses, to closing in on the defence, to results dissemination, and everything in between and beyond, the doctoral journey presents incalculable obstacles that can be, and have been, overcome by doctoral graduates—including the contributors in this inspirationally-sparked collective narrative.

Contributors are: Trudy Cardinal, Philip Wing Keung Chan, José da Costa, Alison Egan, Janet McConaghy, June McConaghy, Kelsey McEntyre, Sammy M. Mutisya, Christina A. Parker, Carla L. Peck, Colin G. Pennington, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Edgar Schmidt, and Pearl Subban.
Issues, Strategies and Good Practices for Inclusion
The social dimension of higher education emphasises the need to create more flexible learning and participation pathways within higher education for all students. In recent years, several projects have been developed and research groups created that have allowed considerable progress in the promotion and monitoring of more inclusive policies in this field. However, designing and implementing programmes providing attention to vulnerable groups remains a challenge for universities. Including the most significant contributions of the European project ACCESS4ALL, the book presents conceptual aspects related to the inclusive university, such as the quality and transitions linked to the treatment of diversity, good inclusion practices in six European countries, and a set of tools to identify dysfunctions and promote inclusion in higher education.

Contributors are: Kati Clements, Fabio Dovigo, Joaquín Gairín, Romiță Iucu, Miguel Jerónimo, Lisa Lucas, Tiina Mäkelä, Elena Marin, Saana Mehtälä, Fernanda Paula Pinheiro, David Rodríguez-Gómez, Cecilia Inés Suárez, Mihaela Stîngu and Sue Timmis.
Integrating Practices and Perspectives for 21st Century Leadership
Author: Brad Kershner
Our ability to understand and improve the field of education depends upon our ability to understand human development, culture, and society. We cannot understand what is happening in schools unless we understand the context in which schools exist. Through meaningful stories of school leadership and critical reflections on theories of complex systems, this book offers a framework for understanding how the intractable dilemmas of education reflect and embody the social, cultural, and developmental patterns of society. From the concrete dilemmas of school leadership to the abstract vistas of integral meta-theory, this book is a guide to understanding how it all fits together, and how to encourage the holistic growth of students, teachers, leaders, and educational systems.

Abstract

Inequalities in training for reasons of geographic, ethnic or social origin and in relation to job opportunities, salaries and incomes are critical dimensions of social exclusion. To combat the permanent nature of such exclusion, it is essential to develop educational policies and actions to extend access to opportunities. ACCESS4ALL is an Erasmus+ project which main aim is to promote the educational and social inclusion of underrepresented groups as well as of non-traditional learners, thereby broadly satisfying one of the main priorities of the European Union (i.e., the improvement of the capacities of organisations active in the fields of education, training and youth, notably in the areas of strategic development, quality of learning provision, equity and inclusion, and qualitative and targeted activities for specific groups) and clearly addressing one of the important features of the Erasmus+ programme: promoting equity and inclusion by providing access to learners who are from disadvantaged backgrounds and have fewer opportunities compared to their peers. ACCESS4ALL addresses those needs by designing an operational framework that systematises, orders and promotes the effective development of actions to promote access and retention for underrepresented groups and non-traditional learners in Europe: the A4A Toolkit.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
Author: Fabio Dovigo

Abstract

In the last twenty years, the goal of developing the social dimension of Higher Education has been part of the wider effort many universities around the world have undertaken to improve and diversify tertiary education through strategic change. However, the recent shift towards a global, highly competitive and market-oriented university system has put growing pressure on academic centres concerning the expansion and differentiation of the research and teaching offered. New forms of organisation have been generated to address these demands, leading to rapid merging or splitting of academic departments, as well as to the establishment of new providers. This process affects the diversity of each university with regard to specific knowledge profiles; teaching, learning and problem-solving styles; and, more generally, the institutional mission, governance and inner culture. The diversification of the student population is an important component at this level, as the success of education programmes offered in most of Higher Education is linked to the ability to provide teaching activities that address learners from diverse backgrounds. The chapter examines what are the consequences of the modernisation and change of the tertiary education sector for the implementation of programmes aimed to foster the inclusion of underprivileged students in Higher Education.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
Author: Fabio Dovigo

Abstract

In the last twenty years, there has been growing interest internationally in the increase and diversification of the population of students attending Higher Education. Higher Education is one of the most important factors that can foster social mobility, by reducing disadvantages and poverty across generations and having a broad impact across all of society. Widening participation in Higher Education, usually referred to as the “social dimension” of the Bologna Process in Europe, aims to promote equality of opportunities concerning: access, retention, participation and successful completion of studies; living and studying conditions; student guidance and counselling; financial support; equal opportunities in mobility; and supporting student participation in Higher Education governance. These objectives are in line with the idea that the diversity of the population should be reflected by the student body, and that students’ participation in Higher Education should not be limited by their different backgrounds. The chapter will offer an analysis of the way the social dimension has been developed in the European context over the years, as well as an overview of the results achieved and the next challenges to be faced by the Higher Education institutions.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
Author: Fabio Dovigo

Abstract

The positive advantages of diversity in the Higher Education environment have been largely documented by research. Nevertheless, face to the apparent benefits of diversity, current attempts to widen and reinforce HE participation still deal with a number of challenges. Even though European governments repeatedly committed to the goals of increasing graduation rates and fostering diversity in HE, the lack of financial support, combined with unfavourable demographic patterns, prevents them to reach such ambitious objectives. Consequently, universities still tend to be open to students that are likely to succeed from the outset more than those that are affected by economic, social or cultural drawbacks. To counter this trend, good practices concerning favouring the access, retention and success of underprivileged students to Higher Education have been brought about in many European countries. The chapter will provide an examination of the socioeconomic, organisational and educational factors that influence the development of good practices in Italy, as well as an evaluation of the advantages and limitations of the good practices approach applied to Higher Education.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe

Abstract

This chapter presents inclusion practices and their state in a Finnish higher education institution. First, six good practices of inclusion that are used in the university are presented. These include, for example, practices that promote accessible education as well as the physical and mental health of all students. The goal of this section is to provide an overall picture and present different perspectives of the work that has been conducted at the HEI in collaboration with various internal and external stakeholders. Second, the inclusion self-assessment tool created by Access4All project is briefly introduced together with the results received by the university on their self-evaluation through the tool. The results suggest that there is a need for better integration of inclusion practices to the daily life of staff and students. Finally, the possible future actions to promote inclusion in Finnish HEIs, such as student involvement, are discussed.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe

Abstract

Romanian universities are focusing more on the social aspects in tertiary education by implementing different support mechanisms in order to overcome considerable challenges, such as the high number and population diversity of disadvantaged groups (people from rural areas, individuals with a Roma background, people with low incomes, people coming from orphanages, etc.). Related to the support mechanism developed and implemented across Romania, we tried, in this chapter, to present several good practices available at national level when it comes to the equity and inclusion. Such examples are targeting, different aspects such as financial aids for students that may encounter problems during their studies. This aid has an impact on long term basis, because the students that benefited from this aid tend not to drop out their courses. Moreover, this chapter includes the results of University of Bucharest’s self-assessment tool. The results from this self-assessment tool suggests some possible actions to improve our university innovative and inclusion capacity, especially in the field of “Policies for inclusion” or “HEI organisational maturity”.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe

Abstract

The implementation in Portugal of the Bologna process brought new challenges to Higher Education, namely in the necessary guarantee of access and success of students. By providing a greater spectrum of opportunities for young people and adults to raise their humanistic training, scientific knowledge and their academic qualifications, HEI have incorporated the heterogeneity and multiculturality of our societies. The academic community in its whole has suffered a radical change. The students, with their individual differences and specific needs, have acquired greater visibility and importance in the definition of institutional strategies and in the adoption of more flexible and adapted teaching/learning models and practices. Policies for inclusion have been the answer to this major shift. The Polytechnic of Leiria is one of the Portuguese HEI that has been deeply committed, to the principles of inclusion, actively seeking to contribute to the training and empowerment of its students, regardless of their specificities. Promoting educational success and building a more sustainable society is the guiding matrix for its action. To this end, it develops multiple actions and programs designed to facilitate the inclusion of students with some type of specific need and/or in a situation of social, psychological or economic vulnerability. The self-assessment process, triggered within the scope of the ACCESS4ALL Project, led by the Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona, allowed the identification of critical points and the potential for improvement resulting from the valorisation of diversity, as a teaching and learning resource

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe

Abstract

The achievement of inclusion and equity in higher education systems is understood as a process rather than a final situation: building inclusive education requires planning, implementation and evaluation of a wide range of strategies. In Spain, the Salamanca Declaration () has highlighted the role of universities not only as agents of transformation of the economic and social system but also regarding their critical contribution when it comes to achieving educational inclusion. This chapter is aimed to identify good practices that make a clear contribution to the inclusion in the Spanish higher education system. First, we present the main features of the Spanish higher education system and the theoretical model developed for this study, drawn into four axes of inequality in higher education. Next, we analyse eight selected good practices from six Spanish Universities related to four topics: Gender, Disability, Refugees and Sexual and Gender Diversity. For each topic and good practice, we provide information regarding the Spanish legal framework, general data from current research and information obtained from the university’s website. Finally, we indicate the importance of continuing to carry out research, actions and strategies in the field of higher education aimed at an increasingly inclusive university system in Spain.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
Authors: Lisa Lucas and Sue Timmis

Abstract

This chapter outlines some of the widening participation policies to increase equity and access to higher education in England that were introduced since the 1990s and provides a critical perspective on the extent of their success. The governing bodies set up to monitor and evaluate these developments are introduced alongside the ‘Access Agreements’ that must be produced by all English universities to demonstrate steps they are taking to widen participation. The challenges for universities are identified and the framework of ‘strategising as a process’ as well as the A4A ‘Pyramid Inclusion Model’ are utilised to consider how universities can respond in ways that can maximise the involvement of different stakeholders. Some of the good practices that have been successful at the University of Bristol are introduced and these form the basis of increasing access for under-represented groups but also building more inclusive communities within the institution. The good practices discussed include, Access to Bristol, The Foundation Year in Arts and Humanities, Peer Mentoring and Be More Empowered for Success. It is argued that there is work still to be done but with a range of stakeholders involved in such initiatives and forms of distributed leadership then meaningful change is possible.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe

Abstract

The desirable link between the university and society justifies its inclusive approach and its social orientation. However, in practice not everyone accesses it, not everyone wants to access it and not everyone should complete their studies if they do not develop the skills of the degree that they attend. Combining equity and quality is possible and desirable, although is not achievable if the processes involved are not properly organised. In this regard, we analyse curricular, organisational and social demands of an inclusive university, focusing the attention on vulnerable groups, including the attention to personal characteristics. We also highlight normative, institutional and operational advances and challenges related to the diagnosis, the intervention and the evaluation of the results. We conclude that: (a) promoting and drive inclusive processes could be the most effective way to tackle discriminatory and exclusionary attitudes; (b) is necessary to restructuring the training institutions to guarantee the properly attention to all students and (c) occasionally, school and university exclusion is the prelude to some social exclusion trajectories.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
In: Understanding Educational Complexity
In: Understanding Educational Complexity