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The Pinocchio Effect

Decolonialities, Spiritualities, and Identities

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Elizabeth Janson

Automatization and systematic exclusion are beyond common sense within U.S. public schools. The failure to address social problems spills over to schools where youth who refuse to conform to the broken system are labelled as deviant and legitimately excluded. Students who conform are made real by the system and allowed back into society to keep manufacturing the same inequalities. This is the Pinocchio Effect. It involves the legitimization of hegemonic knowledge and the oppression of bodies, mind, and spiritualities. The book analyzes the impact of colonialities within U.S. public education by examining the learning experiences that influence teachers’ and students’ spiritualties, affecting the construction and oppression of their identities. Consequently, the author examines how educators can decolonize the classroom, which functions as a political arena as well as a critical space of praxis in order to reveal how realities and knowledges are made nonexistent—an epistemic blindness and privilege.

Education for Employability (Volume 2)

Learning for Future Possibilities

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Will Letts and Geoffrey Crisp

We often look back at changing trends in higher education and call them "bandwagons" (temporary fads that everyone rushes to be part of and "jump on"). While much of the hype and jargon of "The Employability Agenda" may fade from the tip of our tongues (or perhaps be subsumed into the norm) in the mid future, there are two fundamental changes that will not: the digital revolution embedded in changing work and economic practices and the “re-globalisation” of the world that this and other politico-economic changes have brought about. These will continue to be part of how we live and work, so tertiary education will need to take its part in supporting employ-ability far beyond either the timing or scope of preparation for initial employment.

Employability is important to local, national and international labour market contexts, parameters and policies. As well as impacting workforces, employability is an essential characteristic of workers. It is very important that employability is understood and enacted as personal employability not just employment of individuals. We have found that employability is defined as much, if not more, by mindset rather than skillset. Part of this mindset involves recognising the unknowns of future work and an even bigger part is recognising our responsibilities as workers and educators lies in shaping our own employability and that of the novice learners and workers in our spaces of influence and communities of practice.

In Education for Employability (Volume 2): Learning for Future Possibilities we continue on from the big agenda discussions of Education for Employability (Volume 1): The Employability Agenda to explore education for employability in a variety of spaces: in the context of higher education as an entrance into the workforce, in joining communities of practice and in the lifelong pursuit of employability – preparing people for a portfolio of careers rather than a job-for-life.

These two books show how educational leaders, educators, industry partners and thought leaders are imagining and addressing the challenges posed by the current and future changes facing our work, practices and workplaces.

Edited by Charles L. Lowery and Patrick M. Jenlink

In the last twenty-five years there has been a great deal of scholarship about John Dewey’s work, as well as continued appraisal of his relevance for our time, especially in his contributions to pragmatism and progressivism in teaching, learning, and school learning. The Handbook of Dewey’s Educational Theory and Practice provides a comprehensive, accessible, richly theoretical yet practical guide to the educational theories, ideals, and pragmatic implications of the work of John Dewey, America’s preeminent philosopher of education. Edited by a multidisciplinary team with a wide range of perspectives and experience, this volume will serve as a state-of-the-art reference to the hugely consequential implications of Dewey’s work for education and schooling in the 21st century. Organized around a series of concentric circles ranging from the purposes of education to appropriate policies, principles of schooling at the organizational and administrative level, and pedagogical practice in Deweyan classrooms, the chapters will connect Dewey’s theoretical ideas to their pragmatic implications.

Mid-Career Faculty

Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities

Edited by Anita G. Welch, Jocelyn Bolin and Daniel Reardon

At a time when higher education institutions in the United States are the subject of increased media scrutiny and nearly continuous loss of funding by resource-strapped state legislatures, a greater understanding of higher education’s bulwark resource—mid-career research and teaching faculty—is more important than ever. Faculty at mid-career comprise the largest segment of academia. For some, this is a time of significant productivity and creativity, yet for others, it is a time of disillusionment and stagnation. Revealing impediments and pathways to faculty job satisfaction and productivity will strengthen higher education institutions by protecting, fostering, and maintaining this vital workforce. In this collection we will explore the lives of mid-career faculty as our authors uncover the complexities in this stage of professional life and discuss support systems for the transition into this period of faculties’ academic careers.

Mid-Career Faculty: Trends, Barriers, and Possibilities is designed for faculty leaders, administration, policymakers, and anyone concerned with the future of higher education. This text offers an examination into an often overlooked period of academic life, that of post-tenure mid-career faculty. Therefore, the aim of this text is to deepen our understanding of the lives of mid-career faculty, to identify barriers that impede job advancement and satisfaction, and to offer suggestions for changes to current policy and practice in higher education.

Contributors are: Joyce Alexander, Michael Bernard-Donals, Pradeep Bhardwaj, Kimberly Buch, Javier Cavazos, Jay R. Dee, Anne M. DeFelippo, Andrea Dulin, Jeremiah Fisk, Carrie Graham, Debbie L. Hahs-Vaughn, Florencio Eloy Hernandez, Yvette Huet, Jane McLeod, Jennifer McGarry, Maria L. Morales, Eliza Pavalko, Laura Plummer, Mandy Rispoli, Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw, J. Blake Scott, Michael Terwillegar, Jenna Thomas and Claudia Vela.

Practice Wisdom

Values and Interpretations

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Edited by Joy Higgs

Practice wisdom is needed because the challenges people face in life, work and society are not simple and require more than knowledge, actions and decision making capabilities. In professional practice wisdom enhances people’s capacity to succeed and evolve and to assist their clients in achieving positive, relevant and satisfying outcomes.

Practice Wisdom: Values and Interpretations brings diverse views and interpretations to an exploration of what wisdom in professional practice means and can become: academically, practically and inspirationally. The authors reflect on core dimensions of practice wisdom like ethics, mindfulness, moral virtue, particularisation and metacognition. The chapter authors tackle the trials that practice wisdom seekers encounter including the demand for resilience, perseverance, finding credibility and humility in practice wisdom, and linking wisdom into evidence for sound professional decision making. Readers are invited to consider what the place of practice wisdom encompasses in pursuing good practice outcomes amidst the turmoil and pressure of professional practice today. Do the imperatives of evidence-based practice and accountability leave enough space for wise practice or is wisdom seen by modern practice worlds as unnecessary, antiquated, unrealistic and redundant? Without a doubt these questions are answered positively in this book in support of the place and value of practice wisdom in professional practice today.

Edited by Juanjo Mena, Ana García-Valcárcel and Francisco J. García-Peñalvo

The essence of this book is to shed light on the nature of current educational practices from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Both teachers and their trainers provide a better understanding of teacher training and learning processes. Mutual interrelations and the provision of knowledge between academia and schools are essential for merging discourses and aligning positions, whereby turning practice into theory and theory into practice in today’s teaching is vital for suitably responding to multiple issues and increasingly diverse contexts.

The array of studies from around the world compiled in this volume allow readers to find common ground, discover shared concerns, and define goals. Studying teaching practice and training in different contexts reveals the state-of-the-art practices and identifies those issues that enable educators to understand the complexities involved. The chapters examine the development of our knowledge and understanding of teaching practices, at the same time as analysing engaging learning environments, the sustainability of learning and teaching practices, and highlighting new practices based on the use of ICTs. The diverse teaching contexts considered in this compilation of international research are organized according to the following topics: Teaching occupational learning and knowledge; Teacher beliefs and reflective thinking; and Innovative teaching procedures.

The contributors are Laura Sara Agrati, Dyann Barras, Verónica Basilotta Gómez-Pablos, Benignus Bitu, Robyn Brandenburg, Heather Braund, Michael Cavanagh, Chiou-hui Chou, Jean Clandinin, Leah L. Echiverri, Maria Flores, Francisco García Peñalvo, María García-Rodríguez, Ana García-Valcárcel, Stephen Geofroy, Raquel Gómez, Jenna Granados, Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir, Jukka Husu, Jóhanna Karlsdóttir, Keith Lane, Celina Lay, Samuel Lochan, Marta Martín-del-Pozo, Ella Mazor, Sharon M. McDonough, Lennox McLeod, Juanjo Mena, Wendy Moran, Brian Mundy, Nkopodi Nkopodi, Lily Orland-Barak, Edda Óskarsdóttir, Samuel O. Oyoo, Stefinee Pinnegar, Eleftherios Soleas, Lystra Stephens-James, Linda Turner, Antoinette Valentine-Lewis, and Sarah Witt.

Higher Education System Reform

An International Comparison after Twenty Years of Bologna

Edited by Bruno Broucker, Kurt De Wit, Jef C. Verhoeven and Liudvika Leišytė

The Bologna Declaration started the development of the European Higher Education Area. The ensuing Bologna Process has run for already 20 years now. In the meantime many higher education systems in Europe have been reformed – some more drastically than others; some quicker than others; some with more resistance than others. In the process of reform the initial (six) goals have sometimes been forgotten or sometimes been taken a step further. The context too has shifted: while the European Union in itself has expanded, the voice for exit has also been heard more frequently.

Higher Education System Reform: An international comparison after Twenty Years of Bologna critically describes and analyses 12 Higher Education Systems from the perspective of four major questions: What is currently the situation with regard to the six original goals of Bologna? What was the adopted path of reform? Which were the triggering (economic, social, political) factors for the reform in each specific country? What was the rationale/discourse used during the reform?

The book comparatively analyses the different systems, their paths of reforms and trajectories, and the similarities and the differences between them. At the same time it critically assesses the current situation on higher education in Europe, and hints towards a future policy agenda.

Contributors are: Tommaso Agasisti, Bruno Broucker, Martina Dal Molin, Kurt De Wit, Andrew Gibson, Ellen Hazelkorn, Gergely Kovats, Liudvika Leišytė, Lisa Lucas, António Magalhães, Sude Peksen, Rosalind Pritchard, Palle Rasmussen, Anna-Lena Rose, Christine Teelken, Eva M. de la Torre, Carmen Perez-Esparrells, Jani Ursin, Amélia Veiga, Jef C. Verhoeven, Nadine Zeeman, and Rimantas Želvys.

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Steven Cork and Debbie Horsfall

“What might the futures of practice be like?” is far from a straightforward question. Emphasising "the" before the word future, implies one future. But futures thinkers have identified a range of futures that people think about. In this book we reflect on possible, probable, and preferable futures in relation to practice and work. Readers are invited to consider how their own engagement in shaping possible futures will support ways of working that they deem preferable, even those they can hardly imagine. Challenging Future Practice Possibilities also examines influences that are maintaining the status quo and others that are pushing interest-driven change. Authors consider the major challenges that practice and practitioners face today such as wicked problems, fears for the future and complex demands and opportunities posed by the digital revolution. A number of examples of future-oriented work directions such as protean careers and artificial intelligence enhancing or even replacing human workforces, are considered along with concerns like the vulnerability of many work situations and workers. In some cases workers and employers alike are unprepared for these challenges, while others see adapting to these situations as yet another pathway of practice futures evolution.

Education for Employability (Volume 1)

The Employability Agenda

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Geoffrey Crisp and Will Letts

Universities are expected to produce employable graduates. In Education for Employability, experts explore critical questions in the employability agenda: Who sets the standards and expectations of employability? How do students monitor their own employability? How can universities design whole curricula and university environments that promote employability? What teaching and learning strategies facilitate the development of employability?

Responsibility for developing and sustaining employability lies with a broad coalition of the individual students, the university, alumni, the professions and industry and is accomplished through the intended curriculum as well as co-curricular, extra-curricular and supra-curricular activities, events and learning opportunities.

The Changing Face of Work

Considering Business Models and the Employment Market

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Paul Whybrow and Asheley Jones

Changing Work Realities

Creating Socially and Environmentally Responsible Workplaces

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Rosemary Leonard and Margot Cairnes

Educational Innovations

Preparing for Future Work

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Asheley Jones

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Ruth Bridgstock

Facing Recruitment Challenges

Entering Workplace Practices

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James Cloutman and Graham Jenkins

Freelancing, Entrepreneurship and Inherent Career Risk

An Exploration in the Creative Industries

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Noel Maloney

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Steven Cork and Debbie Horsfall

Our Place in Society and the Environment

Opportunities and Responsibilities for Professional Practice Futures

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Steven Cork

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Bernadine Van Gramberg

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Steven Cork and Kristin Alford

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Steven Cork and Debbie Horsfall

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Sandy O’Sullivan

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Steven Cork and Debbie Horsfall

Re-imagining Practice Structures and Pathways

Starting to Realise Tomorrow’s Practices Today

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Joy Higgs and Daniel Radovich

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Edited by Joy Higgs, Steven Cork and Debbie Horsfall

Reflections about Work

What Might Be My Future Practice Roles?

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Joy Higgs

Thinking the Unthinkable

Challenges of Imagining and Engaging with Unimaginable Practice Futures

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Steven Cork and Debbie Horsfall

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Thomas Carey, Farhad Dastur and Iryna Karaush

Navigating Uncertainty

Sensemaking for Educational Leaders

Shelley Hasinoff and David Mandzuk

In Navigating Uncertainty: Sensemaking for Educational Leaders, the authors introduce a 5-step sensemaking approach for managing the kinds of challenging problems, dilemmas and crises that occur daily in educational systems. Drawing on complexity theory, social capital, and sensemaking, they make the case that educational leaders can no longer rely on traditional scientific principles or their own instincts to manage complex problems but need a new way to think about their certainties and their relationships. The authors illustrate their approach with scenarios, based on the real-life experiences of principals, superintendents and deans and provide several innovative tools to help educational leaders better understand and navigate the uncertainties they face every day in their jobs.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.
The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

Lauren Stephenson, Barbara Harold and Rashida Badri

In a world of constant change, the ongoing education and empowerment of women is a transformation of profound significance. In the UAE, and in Dubai in particular, the emergence of women into positions of leadership has accelerated over the past thirty years and continues to gather pace, reflecting a worldwide trend. Emirati women's entry into leadership positions in all fields has resulted in social and economic benefits across education, health, commerce and community services – all of which have strengthened the role of women at the grassroots level. As the world grows smaller, the global circle of opportunity for women grows wider. Throughout the UAE and all across the globe women are assuming their rightful place as leaders in education and in society.
The authors conducted a ten-year collaborative narrative research project culminating in a book of jointly constructed stories of five exceptional female Emirati educational leaders. The five women from Dubai are Raja Al Gurg, Raya Rashid, Fatima Al Marri, Rafia Abbas, and Rashida Badri. Through stories of lived experience, this book recognizes the expertise and contributions of these women to the fields of education and leadership; provides exemplars for educators; demonstrates to younger generations what successes and challenges this generation of women faced in order to achieve recognition as successful women and members of the local, regional, and global community; and makes their leadership perspectives and experiences accessible and engaging for all types of audiences.

The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World

Resources and Challenges Related to the Professional Work of Teaching

Edited by Hannele Niemi, Auli Toom, Arto Kallioniemi and Jari Lavonen

The teacher's role is changing rapidly throughout the world. Traditional ways of working as a teacher are being challenged and teachers are faced with new areas of expertise they need to manage as educational professionals. These characteristics, challenges, and changes in the teacher’s role have been identified internationally and are both conceptual and practical. Teachers’ work now includes much more than teaching in classrooms and has expanded to designing new learning environments, collaboration and networking with others and mentoring colleagues. The Teacher’s Role in the Changing Globalizing World addresses the significance of considering these issues, researching them, and emphasising the importance of actively influencing and protecting the parameters of the teacher role.

Experiments in Agency

A Global Partnership to Transform Teacher Research

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Edited by Supriya Baily, Farnoosh Shahrokhi and Tami Carsillo

This book is about teacher agency and leadership, but it is also an experiment in shifting the balance of power in research and writing. It is about making accessible the process of academic publishing in a way that capitalizes on the knowledge of people in diverse contexts and with novice eyes and is an experiment in sharing academic writing between master teachers and doctoral students. It is also a book on the power of action research and the belief we have as teacher educators about the transformative power of teachers in their own classrooms. Pairing master teachers from ten countries who were part of the Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program with graduate students, this book provides a framework to decolonize research practices in an effort to re-envision research methodologies on a global scale. The book also provides a tangible way to see how research processes support local transformation, and direct engagement of those at the margins to play a greater role in the production of scholarly knowledge. The cross-national scope of this book, with authors working in classrooms in countries as diverse as Turkey, Chile, and Bangladesh coupled work of novice US-based scholars to engage in the conceptualizing, researching, data analysis and writing of chapters speaks to the importance of new voices in the field of research. Additionally, the combination of teacher research projects in the classroom juxtaposed with chapters that speak to the process of teacher research in a global context provides both theoretical and empirical foundations for teacher research.

Out-of-Field Teaching Practices

What Educational Leaders Need to Know

Anna Elizabeth du Plessis

Society perceives the role of school leaders as ‘fixers’. Yet the author poses some confronting questions: can they fix or manage the out-of-field phenomenon without having in-depth knowledge and understanding? Can educators teach the next generation of teachers and school leaders without appreciating the realities of the workplace? Can policymakers develop effective policies without a deeper understanding of the workforce issues that influence quality education beyond the obvious issues?
Many dilemmas face today’s teaching workforce and workplaces. The book takes the reader on a journey as experienced in real life by teachers and school leaders. It aims an extreme global focus on the quality of education and on governments’ achievements in providing opportunities to prepare the next generation of students for their future.
The author’s assessment exposes more concerns than assurances.
Anna du Plessis’ academic career includes more than 25 years of classroom experience across three countries. Her journey in leadership positions started during her fourth year of teaching. Her compassion for teachers, school leaders and students stimulated a search for a deeper understanding of the lifeworld and challenges facing educational practitioners.
The objective in this book is to share information that will improve education systems, strategies, decisions, policies and actions. Readers of this book might be parents, student teachers, prospective school leaders, educational directors, policymakers or teacher educators.
Only knowing and understanding can inform well-directed decisions.

Women of Influence in Education

Practising Dilemmas and Contesting Spaces

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Edited by Nita Cherry and Joy Higgs

The goal in writing this book was to stimulate more comprehensive conversations about women in leadership situations (particularly secondary and tertiary education contexts) by understanding how women have gone about creating positive differences in educational environments.
Frequently books about women and leadership deal with the politics of this discussion space and the statistics of women succeeding to and through the glass ceiling, or not! The focus of this book is on a different space: on learning from the experiences of women doing leadership work.
The research strategy underpinning the book was to listen to the voices and stories of 28 women occupying senior roles in education. Half of these women were principals of independent Victorian secondary schools and the other half were in professorial and senior leadership roles in Victorian universities. Through this listening and pondering on their experiences the authors came to recognise that these women of influence were working in contested spaces and facing multiple practice dilemmas. Readers are invited to explore these spaces and dilemmas, considering the learnings from the women whose lives, views and experiences are represented here.

The Best Available Evidence

Decision Making for Educational Improvement

Edited by Paul Newton and David Burgess

In The Best Available Evidence : Decision-Making for Educational Improvement, the editors and contributing authors explore the intricacies of working with data and evidence for the purpose or organizational development in educational institutions. A broad theme that runs throughout this book is the need for policy makers and practitioners to be informed and critical consumers of educational research. The chapters in this volume explore quantitative, qualitative, narrative, and practitioner research approaches and explore the implications for evidence use in educational improvement efforts.
Many current texts provide an instrumental resource for educational leaders for use in designing road maps for improvement. As such, these texts offer a perspective based on assumptions that educational personnel are the recipients of predetermined knowledge and evidence, and it is the task of instructors and teachers to implement received knowledge of “best practice”. In this book, we suggest that teachers, instructors, educational leaders, and policy makers are equally engaged in the creation of knowledge and the establishment of improvement objectives. Further, we address questions concerning what constitutes improvement, how practitioners and policy makers can assess the utility and veracity of evidence, and how evidence might be considered in productive and ethical ways. This volume is intended for a broad readership of teachers, post-secondary instructors, graduate students, educational leaders, and policy makers. Finally, this book will combine K-12 perspectives on educational improvement with perspectives from the research on post-secondary improvement.

Cultivating Knowledge

Promoting Research to Enrich Everyday Practice

Scott Tunison

Over the last decade or two, there has been increasing consensus that academic research, if used judiciously to guide practice, improves both educational policy and pedagogy—ultimately leading to better outcomes for students. Yet, despite this potential, there remains a deep ravine between the body of knowledge built through research—especially at the intersection between specific interventions and improved student achievement—and the actions taken by policy makers, administrators, and classroom teachers in their regular practice. There are myriad reasons for this research-practice divide. Among them is that it is difficult for district-based people to access primary research. Furthermore, multiple waves of well-intentioned research-based but largely unsuccessful school reform efforts have resulted in skepticism among practitioners about research and, at the same time, damaged researchers’ credibility in the field.
This book is divided into three broad areas. First, it develops an engaging analysis of the root causes for the research-practice gap in education. Second, it describes the framework developed and used in a public school district by the author to address the root causes and provides evidence of its efficacy to facilitate greater incorporation of research into school- and district-level practice. Through a process the author calls Knowledge Cultivation, the framework uses weekly research summaries for district leaders that are relevant to their “real-time” issues along with suggestions about ways in which the research might be useful. The final section of the book includes the actual research summaries used by the author over a five-year period.

Edited by Antonio L. Ellis

This book shares the thoughts of mostly North American scholars on many interrelated topics that have not previously been linked in academic research. The focus of the book is the belief that the Ed.D. can prepare highly competent justice-oriented scholars who will be engaged with communities. Among these future leaders, the contributors envision educators who not only lead public schools, but also private foundations, not-for-profit organizations, and community centers.
An outstanding feature of this volume is that each chapter highlights existing and emerging issues such as, but not limited to, candidate recruitment and admission policies; program funding, fees, and student expenses; academic support services; faculty recruitment, compensation, evaluation, and promotion models; on-site/on-line instruction, internship policy, opportunities for graduate student employment, publishing, and conference engagement; student supervision protocols; and dissertation and capstone project parameters. In addition, the book explores cultural and socio-political contexts, public/private sector relationships, and the kinds of legislation that frame Ed.D. theory, policy, and practice from a social justice perspective.

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Edited by Ian R. Haslam and Myint Swe Khine

Much has been written of late about the need to reform school systems across the world. In like manner there have been many attempts to change school systems for the better but without a great deal of success. This, in part, has much to do with the inertia in school systems and the nature of the work. The professional isolation of teachers from one another in schools is no excuse but it is a key factor in the development of system wide professional capital. This book explores the importance of school leadership and the use of digital media to develop social capital in schools. Particular examples of school reforms that focused on developing professional capital with varying degrees of success are to be seen in the UAE, in reforms to the Australian middle school, and in attempts to reform the Community College in the USA.
Throughout the book there are three powerful ideas associated with successful large scale reforms. First, there are the structural elements that all successful school systems have in common including revised curriculum standards, a reliable assessment system, technical skills of teachers and school leaders, a comprehensive data system, rewards and remuneration of workforce and policy documents to support change. Second, strategic imperatives such as the singular focus on teaching and learning for student success, the need to build workforce capacity in schools, the need to ensure system wide implementation of reforms and the importance of collaboration and team building. Third, the systematic development of professional learning communities and teacher leadership will increase social capital in schools which will ensure student success. This book looks at overcoming the inertia to school reform in education systems caused by structural deficiencies, strategic shortfalls and implementation procedures.

Power, Discourse, Ethics

A Policy Study of Academic Freedom

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Kenneth D. Gariepy

In this unique study, emerging higher education leader and policy expert Kenneth D. Gariepy takes a Foucauldian genealogical approach to the study of the intellectually “free” subject through the analysis of selected academic freedom statement-events. Assuming academic freedom to be an institutionalized discourse-practice operating in the field of contemporary postsecondary education in Canada, a specific kind of cross-disciplinary, historico-theoretical research is conducted that pays particular attention to the productive nature and effects of power-knowledge. The intent is to disrupt academic freedom as commonsensical “good” and universal “right” in order to instead focus on how it is that the academic subject emerges as free/unfree to think—and therefore free/unfree to be—through particular, effective, and effecting regimes of truth and strategies of objectification and subjectification. In this way, the author suggests how it is that academic freedom operates as a set of systemically agonistic practices that might only realize a different economy of discourse through the contingent nature of the very social power that produces it.

Educational Leadership Relationally

A Theory and Methodology for Educational Leadership, Management and Administration

Scott Eacott

Winner! Australian Council for Educational Leaders’ Hedley Beare Award 2015—for most outstanding education writing providing new and significant knowledge about educational leadership.
Educational leadership, management and administration has a rich history of epistemological and ontological dialogue and debate. However in recent times, at least since the publication of Colin Evers and Gabriele Lakomski’s trilogy—knowing, exploring and doing educational administration—there has been a distinct dearth. Educational Leadership Relationally explicitly returns matters of epistemology and ontology to the centre of the discussion. Through a sustained and rigorous engagement with contemporary thought and analysis, Scott Eacott articulates and defends a relational approach to scholarship in educational leadership, management and administration.
Eacott belongs to a group of scholars in educational administration who could be called meta-sociologist. This group blends sociology, historical revisionism, managerial theories and general philosophy to emphasise the relevance of sociological analysis in the field of educational administration. Proposing a relational turn, Eacott outlines a methodological agenda for constructing an alternative approach to educational leadership, management and administration scholarship that might be persuasive beyond the critical frontier.
The relational research programme is arguably the most ambitious agenda in educational leadership, management and administration coming out of Australia since Colin Evers and Gabriele Lakomski’s natural coherentism and Richard Bates’ Critical Theory of Educational Administration. As a research agenda, it engages with: the centrality of administration in constructions of the social world; the legitimation of popular labels such as ‘leadership’; the inexhaustible and inseparable grounding of administrative labour in time and space; and overcomes contemporary tensions of individualism/collectivism and structure/agency to provide a productive—rather than merely critical—space to theorise educational leadership, management and administration.

Leadership for Change in Teacher Education

Voices of Canadian Deans of Education

Edited by Susan E. Elliott-Johns

Leadership for Change in Teacher Education: Voices of Canadian Deans of Education presents a rich sampling of diverse perspectives on the topic in a unique collection of reflections contributed by Canadian deans of education. The focus of the inquiry, “What would we hear from deans of education invited to share their perspectives on leadership for change in contemporary teacher education?” invited deans of education to reflect on the research, policies and practices currently informing their leadership. The results, fourteen engaging and provocative essays, offer important insights and increased understandings of the complex nature of their work and explore concerns raised in relation to lived experience and the multi-faceted processes of leading change for teacher education in contemporary contexts. Reflections in these short essays underscore the critical role of deans in provoking, supporting and championing new ideas and approaches to pedagogy for teacher education, and make clear the complexities inherent in leading the change. The Coda highlights the limited scope of related research available in the current literature and recommends urgent attention, in both research and practice, to the preparation of deans and support for their ongoing professional learning and sustainable leadership.

Passage through the Threshold of Technological Change

Insights into Leading Qualities of a Teacher

Elizabeth Majocha

Technology is becoming entrenched in schools’ daily operations and classrooms. The evolution of information communication technology (ICT) is changing teachers’ delivery of content, their interactions with students, and their management of information. Because ICT places new, unfamiliar demands on preparation time, it challenges teachers to strengthen their qualities to lead others and to help them thrive during technological change.
As a result of the author’s research work towards her doctorate degree, this book focuses on the four sets of qualities that are vital to teachers who are leading teachers, administrators, “digitally native” students, parents, and ICT professionals. These qualities are hidden in every teacher and appear to be deceptively simple, yet teachers need to nurture them within their core to effectively communicate and collaborate with others and expand their instructional repertoire with ICT. As these qualities strengthen, teacher leaders will be able to help their colleagues to realize their potential to use ICT beyond the classroom. This book focuses on the essence of being a teacher leader:

Coaching and mentoring
Assisting student learning
Supporting others
Becoming a curious technologist

Taken from the author’s research findings, this book presents much-needed teacher leadership reflections for teachers, school administrators, directors, and professors on building qualities to lead others through weaving ICT into the culture of their classrooms.

Career Moves

Mentoring for Women Advancing Their Career and Leadership in Academia

Edited by Athena Vongalis-Macrow

Mentoring and career guidance are the missing ingredients in women’s career planning at the higher education level. This book recognizes and gives voice to some of the common career concerns of women in higher education and responds to these through well informed, researched and experiential chapters focussing on interests specific to women in academia.
Career Moves is an international collection of book chapters that explore a range of specific issues that all women in higher education face or will face as they move up the career ladder. The book follows a career trajectory from new academics, middle academics and senior academics, in order to provide specific mentoring advice thatwill be useful, practical and essential for all women contemplating a career in higher education.

The book draws on the substantial knowledge, experience and information of successful women currently working in higher education. Each chapter presents strategic information for academics working in higher education who may be seeking insider’s advice about negotiating their careers. The authors, as ‘mentors’, reflect, discuss and offer critical learning to the readers. The aim is to help guide and shape women’s career moves in higher education.
In this international edition authors have given personal accounts of what works and how women could prepare for the next stages of their academic careers. Authors have given sociological accounts of obstacles and how these can impede women if they are not aware of strategies to overcome barriers. Insights about successful mentoring programs are highlighted to provide possible models for organizations.

Leading for Educational Lives

Inviting and Sustaining Imaginative Acts of Hope

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John Novak, Denise Armstrong and Brendan Browne

This book is written for the growing number of people (teachers, administrators, support staff, parents, and community members) throughout the world who wish to face the challenges of school leadership in ways that feel right, make sense, and contribute to sustaining defensible educational practices.

Using and extending the evolving core ideas of the global inviting school movement, it provides a hopeful approach to educational leadership, management, and mentorship that combines philosophical defensibility, administrative savvy, and illustrative stories. A systematic framework for examining the challenges of educational leadership, the Educational LIVES model, is used to organize the book. It is centred on the idea that leadership is fundamentally about people and the caring and ethical relationships they establish with themselves, others, values and knowledge, institutions, and the larger human and other-than-human world.

Emphasized throughout the book are the special quality of relationships needed to appreciate individuals in their uniqueness and the types of messages that intentionally call forth their potential to live educational lives. We call this approach the inviting perspective and offer the experiences of educators from around the world who put imaginative acts of hope into practice daily as they lead, manage, and mentor.

Reframing Transformational Leadership

New School Culture and Effectiveness

Series:

Edited by Issa M. Saleh and Myint Swe Khine

One of the more common causes of school system failure is the absence of effective leadership. Ideally, school leaders are supposed to be the change agents and facilitators whose primary mission is to improve school culture and bring about the effective transformation that leads to a model Professional Learning Community (PLC). School leaders must focus on developing human capital by working collaboratively with teachers, students, and all who are involved within the system.

Effective school leadership has been examined from a variety of perspectives, with the focus ranging from the principles of servant leadership to moral imperatives and distributed perspectives. The debate on what constitutes effective school leadership continues to be wide-ranging and complex. Today’s research scholarship will be the groundwork for how tomorrow’s schools develop a new breed of leadership. Upcoming leaders will face new, unforeseen challenges, so they must re-evaluate strategies and re-work standard processes, in order to promote sustainable development within their respective school systems. Tomorrow’s leaders will be expected to lead a diverse collective of students and teachers, to foster an enduring and empowering culture among students, teachers and other stakeholders committed to build a successful learning community.

Series:

Patricia Stringer

At a time when there is a high demand for capacity building in schools, many administrators and practitioners find little if any empirical studies on how this can be achieved in practice. Through the eyes of an experienced researcher, schoolteacher, senior administrator and university lecturer, this book captures how a low decile school in New Zealand successfully built its capacity for improvement. Dr. Patricia Stringer allows the reader, who could be anyone with an interest in education, leadership and school development, to identify contextual problems and difficulties that limit capacity building and suggests pathways to overcome them. This is an easy to read and enjoyable book, but, one that digs deep into practice. The researcher spent over a year working with the staff, board and parents of this school discovering and recording authentic information about this school’s successful journey to success. For the researcher, this was an exciting experience; one that needs to be shared with the wider educational community. A must read book.

The Creation of a Professional Learning Community for School Leaders

Insights on the Change Process from the Lens of the School Leader

Amalia Humada-Ludeke

The unwavering culture of continuous improvement efforts to bring about school change has irrevocably changed the role expectations for the school leader. The school leader in the 21st century is increasingly perceived as an instructional leader expected to implement whole-school reform models that can shape teacher practice and influence student outcomes. The significant changes in role expectations for school leaders present considerable challenges to an educational system that was not designed to incorporate these conceptualizations. In light of the increased acceptance of changed leadership expectations, the elements that are needed for developing, supporting, and sustaining instructional leaders who can lead systemic change efforts are frequently not present, are fragmented, or are observed at various developmental stages throughout the pK-20 pipeline.
This book is centered on the learning and changed behaviors of school leaders, who engaged in a sustained job-embedded professional learning community, facilitated through a university-district partnership. The learning from the findings suggested that job-embedded learning with their peers can be instrumental for these principals to build the capacity to lead systemic change efforts.
The findings further suggested that creating conditions for new understanding to occur, and sustained opportunities to apply new learning in context to their role, entailed a collaborative effort by a partnership involving two separate institutions with different priorities.
The author makes a case for the educational pipeline, to prioritize the support and understanding of complex systemic change efforts and innovations, as they are linked to school improvement

Creative Leadership Signposts in Higher Education

… Turn Left at the Duck Pond!

J. Fiona Peterson

Creative ways of thinking about leadership are helpful to guide practice and personal growth. This book builds a strategic roadmap for creative leadership practice, putting the spotlight on a leader’s professional development journey in the process.
The book is about leadership on the ground in higher education, where the ‘rubber hits the road’. It can also be useful in business, or for anyone wanting to think outside the square. Through a creative storytelling approach, the author takes the reader through Tuscany and her on-the-job experience as a leader of learning and teaching. Along the way, she explains some of the theoretical influences on her thinking and practice—in ways and combinations she hadn’t read about in other leadership books, or experienced in professional development programmes.
Through real stories, the author shows how she made creative connections in building her own knowledge on present and past experience, with reflection on how practice can be improved with a clear focus on collegiality and strategic outcomes. This approach reflects the five creative leadership signposts that she explains and illustrates throughout the book.

Leadership for Inclusive Education

Values, Vision and Voices

Series:

Edited by G. Mac Ruairc, Eli Ottesen and R. Precey

Inclusion is increasingly becoming one of the policy drivers shaping educational discourse and practice. What constitutes the term “inclusion” itself and how ideas derived from the different perspectives on inclusion impact school leadership practice point to a highly contested field of enquiry. Originally embedded in discourse relating to special education, ideas relating to inclusion are attracting much broader appeal within system reforms in many jurisdictions. This book seeks to keep the consideration of inclusion firmly in its broader context and to decouple it from the discourse relating to students with special educational/additional needs. This allows the authors to position their contributions more explicitly within discourses that draw on difference and diversity as unavoidable features of schools. Within this collection we address the current political dogmas in many countries that take a purely rational, managerial approach to leadership, arguing that this is not contributing to inclusion in schools. In doing this, the book seeks to shape current discourses on leadership by exploring perspectives which are likely to enhance our understanding of inclusion. Tolerance, respect, listening, clarifying language, being comfortable with differences and ambiguity and articulating and challenging the rationale behind “the way we do things around here” are key aspects of inclusive leadership, and also fundamental imperatives for writing this book. It will be useful to those in education who are engaged in further academic study in education or in reflective practice and to anyone taking advanced programmes in educational leadership and management. The international perspectives on the issue of inclusion informing this book ensure that this book will be essential for those engaged in a comparative analysis of leadership practice in different contexts or those concerned with the complexity of ensuring inclusive models of education.

The Servant

Leadership Role of Catholic High School Principals

Joseph Nsiah and Keith Walker

There is a world-wide thirst for authentic leaders who are somehow able to create school learning communities characterized by the purveyance of flourishing faith, hope, and love. Servant-leadership for Catholic school principals is considered one of the most meaningful and effectual callings imaginable. Informed by conversations with six exemplary servant leaders, this book explores the servant-leadership vocation of Catholic school principals. The culminating conceptual framework emphasizes the importance of personal identity and Faith formation as foundational to the exercise of authentic servant-leadership. As each Catholic school community lives out its unique features, signature history, a particular call to meet community needs, and its leader-shaped personality, this book serves to remind educators to clarify and sharpen their service toward the common mission of Catholic schooling. The relevance of servant leadership in the Catholic school principalship is demonstrated through the experiences, insights, narratives and expertise of the principals and then synthesized with conceptual reflections. An underlying theme in this book is that the exercise of servant-leadership provides hope for followers because of its exceptional interest in helping all constituents develop their own capacities, capabilities and potentials such that each person becomes a servant leader.

Series:

Cornell Thomas

Most, if not all, individuals who have given any thought to the subject believe that students and teachers in today’s public schools deserve better. They deserve the same types of teaching and learning environments that are often found in elite private schools. Teachers in these environments combine the best of essentialist and progressive educational philosophies that cause students to become highly skilled critical thinkers. Teachers, most of them, have the skills to deliver both the science and the art of teaching and learning. The science here represents the wealth of knowledge needed in their particular fields of study and teaching. The art refers to the ability to connect the knowledge their students possess with the information they want them to learn. Students in these environments are active, engaged learners. . . and teachers. Leadership facilitates a process to support these highly interactive teaching and learning environments. Leaders who are most successful in this work demonstrate a commitment to engagement.
To lead with a commitment to engagement means to value every person’s self-identity, their presence, and the gifts they bring to the organization. It means practicing inclusion intentionally. The inclusion of all voices involved in the life of the organization results in levels of synergy where excellence becomes the norm and even higher levels sought. Engaged leaders are personable, hand-on, supportive, facilitating, visionary, inclusive and very successful.
It is the premise of this book that leadership should be focused on serving others in inclusive ways. Leadership should, as a primary task, help to create pathways that empower others to successfully complete the work at hand and to do so including all voices in the process.

Series:

Edited by Sylvester Chen and Michael Kompf

This collection of papers by a group of Chinese educational administrators came about through a graduate study program that facilitated comparisons of educational practices from other cultures against the backdrop of globalization. Collaborative international programs allow contrast and comparisons of practices, policies and educational principles but are not without barriers faced by candidates which can include but are not limited to culture shock and communication and language adjustments. Comparisons of international educational institutions are telling when examined through transfer credit policies, degree recognition, institutional accreditation and the value of academic credits in a globalized educational marketplace. China and Chinese educators recognize that movement and take it most seriously as demonstrated by the group of educational ambassadors who have contributed a variety of perspectives and interests to this volume. They are a new wave of thinkers whose studies embrace their native culture and open minds to alternative ways of understanding and acting on rapidly changing educational circumstances for learners, teachers and administrators.

Getting There

Women's Journeys to and Through Educational Attainment

Cynthia Lee A. Pemberton

This book chronicles the lived experience/educational journeys of women who found themselves moving forward together pursuing doctoral degrees in Educational Leadership. Grounded in the realities of women’s lives these inspirational first-person narratives have the potential to raise awareness regarding women’s socialization, expectations, and the role interpersonal and community connections play in the lived female experience. This book provides a potential resource for those considering how relationships and support groups impact life’s journey, and their importance in overcoming barriers to educational attainment and success. In her book Flux, Peggy Orenstein encourages women to share their experiences, and “talk across lines of age and circumstance” (p. 292). This book does that, bringing into focus the complicated and convoluted, knotty, thorny, messy realities of women’s lives. Seeing clearly the forest and the trees, the grass, the shrubs, and dirt—the fully fleshed-out realities, we, as educators, can more fully and accurately see and appreciate the conflicting, competing chaos that characterizes and often monopolizes women’s lives; and from there establish a foundation of understanding from which to begin retooling higher education to better meet the life and learning needs of all our students. “In the end…” Orenstein says, “…there is no single path to a textured, satisfying life-nor should there be” (p. 293); and indeed, as this book reveals there is not. Despite geographical and generational differences, these women’s independent and intersecting lives created, and even today supports and sustains their ongoing connection, empowerment and achievements, and as such not only leaves a legacy for others, but a blueprint of and for hope.

Theory into Practice

Case Stories for School Leaders

Series:

Julie A. Gorlewski, David A. Gorlewski and Thomas M. Ramming

This book does exactly what its title suggests: it takes the theoretical and conceptual nature of leadership and positions it in the real world of school governance—where teachers, administrators and community stakeholders grapple with issues of change, diversity, influence, motivation, policy, and law.

>Organized around the widely accepted Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards, Theory into Practice: Case Stories for School Leaders offers a rich combination of current literature on educational leadership, real-life school-based situations, and a framework for decision-making.

Designed for both current and aspiring school leaders, this book provides the perfect complement to coursework and clinical experiences by offering case stories at all levels: from teacher leader, to building leader, to district leader. The case story format enables readers to experience a wide range of school-based issues from a variety of perspectives. Through this construct, the authors present a strong case for reflective leadership and thoughtful decision-making.

Given the current climate of standards, standardization, and hyper-accountability in education, this book reminds readers that education—and educational leadership—remains an intensely human experience.

Series:

Edited by Wayne J. Urban

This volume consists of twenty six autobiographical essays by leading historians of American education which document the enormous variety of paths taken to get into this field.
A companion to earlier volumes on philosophy of education and curriculum studies, the historians in this volume reflect a wide variety of interests that underlay accomplishment in this scholarly field. They come from diverse backgrounds that have animated their scholarly careers in compelling ways.
Readers in any variety of educational or historical study should learn from this volume how unplanned careers can still result in highly successful sets of accomplishments. That realization is a tribute both to the individual contributors and to the great attractiveness of educational history to committed scholars of various backgrounds and orientations.

Scott Eacott

This book is dedicated to an analysis and synthesis of research on strategy and school leadership, with the ultimate goal of suggesting a new research programme.

Each chapter takes up this challenge through different means, resulting in an overview of the construct of strategy within the practice of school leadership. It is hoped that each of these chapters encourages students, practitioners and scholars to continue to investigate this important topic and to undertake the methodological challenges set out to advance our understanding of strategy and school leadership in managerialist times.

Despite maintaining a primarily scholarly focus—as such a focus is exceedingly important for the advancement of any domain of inquiry—it is also recognised that many of the ideas discussed have profound practical significance for schools and those who lead and manage them.

The arguments in this book, particularly those in the latter chapters seek to expand the horizons of scholarship and understanding on the topic of strategy and school leadership. Although this should not be interpreted as a prescriptive call for how further inquiry should be undertaken, it is but one voice in the conversation. The reviews, studies, analysis and proposed research programme of this book argue that the strategies of school leaders are of considerable theoretical and practical importance to schools, the governance of schooling and the behaviour and performance of schools. While this book offers a blueprint for further inquiry, it remains for the reader to accept the challenge. Doing so will enable important new insights into strategy and school leadership.

Working Through Ethics in Education and Leadership

Theory, Analysis, Plays, Cases, Poems, Prose, and Speeches

James Kent Donlevy and Keith Walker

This book, although targeting educational leaders, - teachers, school-based administrators, superintendents, board members, policy makers and education students, is also addressed to those interested in the topic of ethics and those who seek the development of an ethical awareness and an appropriate intellectual processes when facing ethical issues.
In particular, the book uses both deductive and inductive methods to provide the reader with a progressive experience of ethical discernment and analysis in order to deal with and prepare the reader to address ethical issues in the public square - a task which requires that such decisions are rational, defensible, and clearly articulated.
Institutional leaders’ diligence and integrity requires no less in attaining and sustaining the support of those they must lead in and through the institutional decisions and policies which effect constituents’ lives.
Through the use of clearly stated definitions, the presentation of ethical schools of thought, cases, original plays - within which readers are encouraged to engage while in a safe learning environment - and references to poems, movie, and video clips, the book provides a lively and challenging approach to studying the topic of ethics.

Sue L.T. McGregor

This book shares a collection of novel ways to re-conceptualize and envision the moral imperatives of consumption, thereby providing invigorating insights for future dialogue and intellectual and social action. It privileges a consumer moral leadership imperative, which augments the conventional management imperatives of sustainability, ethics, simplicity and environmental integrity. There are 13 chapters, including first-ever discussions of non-violent consumption, transdisciplinary consumption, consumer moral adulthood, integral informed consumption, conscious and mindful consumption, biomimicry informed consumption, and consumer moral leadership as a new intellectual construct. The book strives to intellectually and philosophically challenge and reframe the act, culture and ideology of consuming. The intent is to foster new hope that leads to differently informed activism and to provocative research, policy, entrepreneurial and educational initiatives that favour the human condition, the collective human family and interconnected integrity. This book strives to move consumers from managing for efficiency to leading for moral efficacy, the ability to use their existing moral capacities to deal with moral challenges in the marketplace. The very core of what it means to be a morally responsible member of the human family is challenged and re-framed through the lens of consumer moral leadership.

Leadership for Inclusion

A Practical Guide

Series:

Edited by Alan L. Edmunds and Robert R. Macmillan

What task might a principal undertake that would be more critical to teachers and students than to engage in leadership for inclusion? All education stakeholders have an inescapable vested interest in enabling principals in their mandate to be better informed about inclusion and to provide leadership based on such insights. In this manner, principals can directly support teachers who enact inclusion with students on a daily basis. Whilst our aspirations for such professional growth and practice in principals are laudable, exactly what this growth and practice might represent is mostly nebulous; therefore, good leadership for inclusion is more likely to occur by happenstance than by meticulous design. That is no longer the case.
This important and timely collection of international writings examines just what comprises the critical issues within inclusion and provides principals with a series of practical guides to direct their practice. This book takes leadership for inclusion out of the purely theoretical realm and firmly plants it in the professional lives and realities of principals and teachers in schools. The fundamental tenets and suggestions provided here have international application and should be essential readings for all principals and others in similar positions who are concerned about the welfare of teachers and students involved in inclusive education.
Leadership for Inclusion: A Practical Guide makes a significant contribution to an emerging literature in which all professional educators, and especially principals, are beginning to vigorously take on the new challenges presented by inclusion and inclusive schooling. Overall, this volume of candid propositions about principals’ practice invites the reader to engage in likeminded analyses and syntheses and to enfold their newfound knowledge and skills into their leadership. Given the influence that inclusion now has on education around the world, there is no task more worthy.

Leading Educational Change Wisely

Examining Diverse Approaches to Increasing Educational Access

Christopher M. Branson

Despite over 40 years of research and writing about how to lead educational change, we still can’t get it right. Although we keep fine tuning our present ways, we are yet to come up with an approach that enables educational change to happen successfully and sustainably. Although this book acknowledges the importance of learning from our past, it also highlights a key deficiency that has consistently compromised these efforts. To date, our approach to leading educational change has mainly focussed on trying to come up with the perfect practical strategy or plan. In contrast, this book argues that leading educational change successfully is not about following a clearly defined process like following a recipe, but it is an improvisational art more like driving down a busy main street during peak hour traffic. The successful leadership of educational change is an improvisational art because although the leader needs to have an overarching strategy, a guiding plan, what they actually do from moment to moment cannot be scripted. The leader has to move back and forth from their plan to the reality currently being experienced so that the plan is being achieved but any adverse effects on those involved are being empathically and immediately attended to as well. This approach to the leadership of educational change emphasises the need of the leader to be able to cope with the unforeseen, the unexpected, and the idiosyncratic. Moreover, this approach to the leadership of educational change emphasises the relational as well as the rational requirements. While such views might be familiar to many, what is new and unique about this book is that it describes how it all can be achieved. It provides clear, research supported, guidance for those who wish to finally lead successful and sustainable educational change.

Kenneth D. Gariepy, Brenda L. Spencer and Jean-Claude Couture

Accountability in First Nations Education

Kwāyāsk Etōtamihk (Doing it Right)

Shelley Willier

Alleviating Teacher Alienation

Sustainable, Distributed Leadership and Capacity for Putting Accountability into Perspective

Heather Kennedy-Plant

Approaches to Accountability

Possibilities for an Alternative Framework

Darren Krasowski

Series:

Athena Vongalis-Macrow

Educational leadership as the dynamic interplay between performance and learning outcomes has been largely depicted as taking place within a pacified educational space in which broader social, political and economic challenges have been stopped at the school’s entrance. However, pressing social and economic issues, such as preserving biodiversity and sustainability, coupled with the prominence of environmental education and environmental ethics in schools and in relevant educational curricula, suggests a misfit between the burgeoning global educationaloutlook demanded by such areas of learning and the narrow, school-based focus of educational leadership. Educational researchers have identified the growing cosmopolitanism of new teachers working with a global epistemic outlook and the impact these new teachers have on the teaching profession and the work of teachers. New teachers have a growing social and cultural awareness, which they seek to pursue through their teaching practice. Fundamental to the more cosmopolitan outlook of new teachers are notions of global interconnectedness and that the role of education is broader and more than delivering fundamental literacy and numeracy. The value of education is determined by how much good it can do for the individual and the learner in the context of global social responsibility. With the advent of cosmopolitan teachers, new forms of educational leadership are required in which the leading of education is underpinned by notions of education as a public good, an educative process able to facilitate broader understandings such as the need for climate stability as a fundamental to all humanity. In this chapter, I will outline key shifts required in educational leadership is order to suggest a better fit between education as a public good and how cosmopolitan leadership can affirm the critical role of educators and education for sustainable futures.

Educational Accountability

Professional Voices From the Field

Edited by Kenneth D. Gariepy, Brenda L. Spencer and J-C Couture

In an age when responses to accountability regimes in education range from hysteria to cynicism, this volume reframes accountability in narratives of collective, participatory responsibility that leave one feeling inspired and ready to act. The authors, all scholar-practitioners speaking from contexts spanning leadership, policy, literacy, indigenous education, and diversity, explore ways to navigate accountability discourses with wisdom, courage and hope.—Tara Fenwick, PhD, Head, Dept. of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia.
In this collection, the preoccupation of educational institutions with accountability is critically examined by writers who work in the field. They consider the impact of accountability regimes on professional practice and the learning agenda, challenge current policies and call for a rethinking of accountability. The skills and knowledge associated with this work is what we should hold schools accountable to. It is, as you see from reading these contributions, time for change.—Stephen Murgatroyd, PhD, Chief Scout, The Innovation Expedition Inc.
About the Book
From their diverse perspectives, nine educational practitioners discuss current educational accountability policies and how these affect students, educators, learning and teaching in a variety of settings, from K-12 schools to post-secondary institutions and government agencies. The authors combine theory, research and their day-to-day experiences to reflect on the challenges posed by realities such as outcomes-based curricula, high-stakes testing, standardized reporting and management by objectives. By examining current accountability initiatives and their effects in relation to core values of public education such as equity, diversity, democracy and opportunity, this book offers educators a range of insights for thinking about and doing education differently.

Leaders in Curriculum Studies

Intellectual Self-Portraits

Series:

Leonard J. Waks and Edmund C. Short

In the 1950s and 1960s school teaching became a university-based profession, and scholars and policy leaders looked to the humanities and social sciences in building an appropriate knowledge base. By the mid-1960s there was talk about a “new” philosophy, history, and sociology of education. Curriculum thinkers such as Joseph Schwab, Dwayne Heubner and Paul Hirst initiated new intellectual projects to supplement applied work in curriculum.
By the 1970s the field was in the process of re-conceptualization, as a new generation of scholars provided deep critical insights into the social, political and cultural dynamics of school experience and templates for renewal of curriculum research and practice.
In this book, 18 leading curriculum scholars since 1970 who remain influential today present the fascinating stories of their lives and important new contributions to the field. They trace their early experiences in teaching and curriculum development, creative directions in their work, mature ideas and perceptions of future directions for the field. Each chapter contains a list of works chosen by the authors as their personal favorites.

Transformative Leadership and Educational Excellence

Learning Organizations in the Information Age

Series:

Edited by Myint Swe Khine and Issa M. Saleh

On records, the evolution of human development pays a considerable tribute to the relentless efforts made by generations of teacher educators set out to train academic leaders and teachers committed to the implementation of educational policies parallel to the mental edification of young students. Teacher educators, faced the challenges, overcame the obstacles, and refined the pedagogies of our educational system with many innovative approaches. As the world faces increasing uncertainties and adamant shifts of knowledge economy, it is apparent that education plays an ultimate role in creating adept and geared up citizens, to lead the way to the future. Designing and managing learning school organizations that can sustain a competitive advantage in this fast-changing environment demands transformative leaders primed and ready to the building or our intellectual capital for the future. Many books on teacher education, educational management and leadership have been written in the past, but most of them do not keep up with the fast-changing educational scene and only a few include future scenarios. This book presents the anticipated trends and demands of the new knowledge economy, and it aims to achieve its goals with the use of various tools, generative and collaborative efforts, increasing leadership capability in dynamic and complex contexts, enculturation of cutting edge knowledge for educational advancement and creation of teams that focus learning organizations.
This book brings together prominent and leading teacher educators and researchers from around the world to present their scholarship, theories and practice, case studies, state-of-the- art approaches and upshot predictions. This book embodies collective knowledge inquiry and represents professional conversations. The chapters provides information on recent trends and development in teacher education, the important role of educational management and leadership in educational transformations and promising practices for desired outcomes. The book is a critical and specialized resource that describes how transformative leadership can play an important role in achieving excellence in education. The topics covered are: Educational Leadership and Effective Teaching, Research in Transformational Leadership, and Professional Development and Social Capital Building in Schools.

Series:

Lejf Moose

Changes in public governance in many countries have brought new structures and relations between state agencies and schools. The states are – with inspiration from global trends and trans- and supranational agencies – being developed into hypercomplex and polycentric states with no single centre of power but with numerous means of influence and networks, where power is distributed and decisions are negotiated. There are isomorphic tendencies in governance at several levels in the ways hard governance (legally binding regulations) is being substituted or supplemented by soft governance (advisory, persuasive and sense-making methods). Many new forms of influences are thus being designed at state, local and organizational levels with strong tendencies towards the use of soft governance in the management of schools and in many cases also in the management in schools. Examples could be management by discourses, social technologies, networking and evaluation. One aspect of the internalisation of education – as demonstrated in the discourse of knowledge societies – is that the expectations towards schools practice and outcomes is changing and so is the expectation towards school leadership

Kenneth D. Gariepy, Brenda L. Spencer and Jean-Claude Couture