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This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.

All royalties from this book are donated to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC), a school in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, that serves the low vision and blind community in the area. For years, the Institute has collaborated as a supervised internship site for various teacher education university programs, providing inspiring field work experiences such as those described in Chapter 4 by Carla Reichmann. Brill is proud to support this important cause and match the donation to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC).
Institutional leadership in higher education today requires the management of academic, financial and human resources to deliver teaching, research, external engagement, IT, student support, quality assurance, and estate management activities at levels ranging from local to global. This requires the development and deployment of subject expertise, diplomacy as well as a whole range of practical and technical skills. It can be difficult to balance the strategic needs of the institution with its practical, day-to-day management.

Drawing on more than 60 years of higher education experience around the world, the authors set out the fundamental elements of all higher education institutions and place them in a practical framework to enable leaders to understand their institutions more clearly, and develop appropriate responses to the unique issues that arise in each.

Accessible, insightful, comprehensive and universally applicable, An Illustrated Guide to Managing Institutions of Higher Education draws on numerous real-world examples and offers practical exercises to enable institutional leaders to understand how their institutions actually work, to develop appropriate responses to the issues that confront them and to manage their institutions more effectively.
International Educationalist Perspectives
Volume Editor: Brent Bradford
The Doctoral Journey: International Educationalist Perspectives assembles a collective narrative related to the doctoral journey of recent graduates in the field of education. Clearly, the doctoral journey is not a linear process but rather a lattice of ever-evolving professional and personal relationships, experiences, perspectives, and insights.

From early on when considering whether or not to apply to a programme, to deciding on an institution and supervisor, to delving into the related literature, to data collection and analyses, to closing in on the defence, to results dissemination, and everything in between and beyond, the doctoral journey presents incalculable obstacles that can be, and have been, overcome by doctoral graduates—including the contributors in this inspirationally-sparked collective narrative.

Contributors are: Trudy Cardinal, Philip Wing Keung Chan, José da Costa, Alison Egan, Janet McConaghy, June McConaghy, Kelsey McEntyre, Sammy M. Mutisya, Christina A. Parker, Carla L. Peck, Colin G. Pennington, Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan, Edgar Schmidt, and Pearl Subban.
In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: Trudy Cardinal

Abstract

This chapter explores my continuous pathway to becoming real. My generative lived experiences are opened up through honouring the autobiographical narrative inquiry process. Further, my experiences of coming to know, as expressed through the creative interplay between learnings acquired from story bundles, Elder knowledge, and thinking with photographs evoke the inspiring tapestry of embodied knowledge that makes life go on. Throughout this chapter, my words reveal the growing pains of learning to trust my own knowing and that becoming real can paradoxically result in feelings of exhaustion and despair. The life-giving energy that flows from my doctoral journey reminds one of the fluxic tensions of life and the necessity of inner knowing to nurture the balance and renewal that is needed to proceed. My being as a Cree/Métis woman, scholar, mother, Kokom, aunty, sister, and friend teach that “find[ing] the love within you” inspires the courage to go on.

In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: Kelsey McEntyre

Abstract

Regardless of an individual’s background, completion of a doctoral degree is a difficult feat. This chapter shares an account of my experience navigating the challenging doctoral journey, while also facing obstacles such as imposter syndrome, lower-middle class socioeconomic standing, societal expectations of women’s roles, becoming a first-time mother, and issues unique to being a first-generation college attendee. Time periods and topics of the doctoral journey such as events leading up to beginning and entrance into the programme, comprehensive examination, the process of dissertating, and the job search for a faculty position in higher education are highlighted. The importance of support in overcoming obstacles during each of these phases of the doctoral journey is reiterated throughout this chapter. Personal anecdotes and experiences are recounted for the purpose of offering suggestions and potential guidance to those wishing to begin or those wishing to support someone during a doctoral journey.

In: The Doctoral Journey

Abstract

In my doctoral research, I studied my professional learning in action by teaching three graduate teacher education courses at a South African university. I took a narrative self-study stance toward research and pedagogy to explore my lived experience as a novice teacher educator. In this chapter, I present a short story of my doctoral journey and my consequent academic path. I describe how I played with visual and language arts-based approaches to develop alternative forms of data representation in my doctoral thesis. And I highlight how my doctoral research supervisor’s support was integral to my arts-based research explorations. Then, I illustrate how, as an outgrowth of my doctoral study, I have cultivated a substantive portfolio of scholarship that engages the power of poetic inquiry as a literary arts-based mode for researching and performing professional learning. To close, I consider the implications of my story. As a doctoral supervisor now myself, I am heedful of the possible longstanding impact of my responses to my students’ work. For other supervisors, I offer my story as an exemplar of the value of nourishing students’ creativity in their doctoral research adventures.

In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey

Abstract

In Kenya, the doctoral experiences during the first academic year are quite similar with differences appearing thereafter depending on individual student context. The first academic year comprises coursework followed by writing of a supervised proposal and dissertation. The drive to pursue and complete the doctoral journey is significant since it is a symbol of prestige and high status in society. Timely completion of the doctoral journey requires adherence to academic rigour, focused research processes, passing examinations, working closely with supervisors and, within set goals and timelines, defending the research project and publishing the research findings. Recent statistics show that Kenya’s doctoral degree completion rate has been low with increased student dropout rates. However, my story is different. My doctoral journey is about setting well-defined goals, allocating adequate time and resources, sacrificing one’s social life, and cultivating a cordial working relationship with supervisors. It is worthy to note that despite the setbacks during the doctoral journey, there is a way through the intense, stressful, and overly rewarding journey. This chapter helps point out that doctoral students should not concentrate as much on the drop out rates, but on the rates of success.

In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: José da Costa

Abstract

This chapter describes the history of doctoral degrees in the field of education to set the context for better understanding of contemporary education doctoral degrees. While many different degrees at the doctoral level are currently awarded by universities, the two most common are the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) and the Doctor of Education (EdD). The primary characteristics setting doctoral-level degrees apart from other degrees, at most Western universities, are the original contribution to knowledge and the defence of the knowledge claims made in the dissertation to a panel of experts, already holding doctoral degrees themselves, in the field of expertise. In North America, the first PhD in education can be traced back to the Teachers College in New York in 1893. The first EdD was granted almost three decades later, in 1921, by Harvard University. Doctoral degree programmes in education are as diverse of the universities offering them and the students pursuing them. Attendance can range from part-time, while the doctoral candidate remains employed full-time, to full-time, in which the doctoral candidate suspends work activities to engage in doctoral scholarship. While traditionally doctoral degree holders typically sought academic positions, today approximately 20% of doctoral degree holders teach and research in higher education settings. The balance work in schools, government, professional organizations, and a variety of other private and public non-profit and for-profit organizations. The importance of the relationship between the doctoral candidate and the research supervisor is critical for success in the programme and, often, afterwards in securing employment requiring the doctoral degree.

In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: Alison Egan

Abstract

This chapter discusses my journey as a part-time doctoral student in Ireland and outlines the influential factors, such as family and previous education, that led to my decision to start a doctoral journey. This chapter identifies key moments throughout my six-year doctoral journey, including a discussion on how I arrived at my research questions, how my research methods were chosen, and how statistical analysis proved to be a challenge along the way. A variety of useful support mechanisms are mentioned, which included peer networks and technology tools. Critical moments along the research journey are also discussed, including a ‘fight or flight’ post-continuation decision, and how I felt like giving up in Year 4. This chapter presents a pragmatic approach to completing the doctoral journey by writing 500 words per day, and ends with an uplifting story about my viva voce and postdoctoral research since graduation.

In: The Doctoral Journey

Abstract

This chapter documents my doctoral experience; that of a female of colour who was a first-generation university student. In negotiating the structural barriers to succeeding in graduate school, I illustrate strategies and competencies that I developed and utilized to overcome challenges. Situated in Canada, where there are large immigrant populations, the experiences of second-generation immigrant and first-generation university students are often hidden. Institutionally, they navigate a system that was not designed to support them, and in the familial context there is often a lack of support from family members, as described in the chapter, who do not necessarily have the knowledge and understanding to navigate higher education systems. This chapter leads readers through my doctoral journey beginning with choosing the programme, supervisor, writing the comprehensive exam, and through the data collection and writing journey. Researching the topic of how first- and second-generation immigrant students are included in the curriculum through peacebuilding education, I illustrate how a researcher’s positionality is subjective; personal experiences and perspectives shape all interpretations of data and subsequent constructions of knowledge. The chapter sheds light on key principles and challenges in supporting first-generation students of colour in higher education.

In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey

Abstract

The doctoral journey is exciting, challenging, and a unique experience for doctoral students. This chapter reflects on my doctoral journey, a few years after completion, and aims to provide some helpful hints for current and future doctoral students to navigate the amazing educational road ahead. This chapter reports my experiences along transnational borders, cross cultures, and academic disciplines. It outlines my life in three parts: myself, my doctoral study, and my academic career at Monash University. I highlight my struggles as an international student when I came to Australia as a host country to focus my research on educational reform issues in my home country utilizing western concepts and theories to interpret these issues. I introduced the critical concepts of Asia as Method and Mohe to overcome these difficulties. The chapter concludes by pointing out that my exciting research projects and excellent research collaborations would not be commenced without completing the doctoral journey.

In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey
In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: Pearl Subban

Abstract

Triggered by personal experiences during my candidature as a doctoral student, this chapter captures some of the key elements of my doctoral journey. In capturing the experience, I hoped to equip prospective and current doctoral students to maintain momentum as they too traverse this complex route. An added layer to my reflection is the narrative around balancing work commitments as a secondary school teacher with the demands of my academic programme. To facilitate this description, I drew from literary works that I was teaching into at the time to enliven the content. The incorporation of several quotes from texts that I interacted with underlined the nature of interweaving my academic programme with employment goals. The chapter is punctuated with guidelines and suggestions to arm prospective students as they embark on the doctoral journey. Ultimately, the chapter is an attempt to bolster the spirits of current students, and to offer critical pieces of advice along the way.

In: The Doctoral Journey

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to provide scholars and prospective doctoral students a description of my particular academic path leading me to a doctoral degree in kinesiology and a career in academia. This purpose was met by reflection and recollection of meaningful checkpoints in my socialization, such as high school influences, college influences, professional experiences, and graduate studies. I recognize the impact of my family and pre-college experience as playing a role in my career choice and academic aptitudes. I discuss the role played by meaningful leaders in my life, such as coaches and professors, as well as immediate family members. I discuss ways I intend to impact the world of education while also describing the way my journey has impacted me, assisting in my personal development. I express what I believe to be sage advice for those interested in pursuing a doctoral journey and/or career in academia. As is the nature of socialization, I acknowledge that my particular points of view and subjectivities cause me to react to particular agents of socialization in a way that makes my experience unique to me.

In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: Edgar Schmidt

Abstract

My doctoral journey is as much personal as it is professional. I highlight the personal and work context that led me to undertake doctoral studies. The personal drive for deeper understanding of educational leadership and a supportive environment are necessary to succeed in completing a doctorate. I outline how my upbringing and early career experience as a teacher led me to examine social justice concerns and a study of wraparound services for children and youth. I explore the methodological challenges I faced in light of the political context at the time of my study. Managing the daily expectations of work while pursuing a research agenda is also touched upon. Despite challenges, there are many rewards to delving deeper into concepts and practices that matter to me and the world within which I live.

In: The Doctoral Journey
Author: Carla L. Peck

Abstract

In this chapter, I explore life after the doctoral journey with an explicit focus on pursuing a career in academia. Through three sections, “Finding Your Way,” “Defining Your Way,” and “Designing Your Way,” I explore key questions and considerations that have shaped my growth as a scholar from graduate student to Professor. Although institutional priorities may at times overshadow our own personal and professional obligations or concerns, I argue that it is essential for each individual to define their own priorities and responsibilities so that they can become and sustain the scholar they want to be.

In: The Doctoral Journey
The Art of Writing for Educators
Writing in Education: The Art of Writing for Educators focuses on educators’ professional journeys and discoveries about teaching, learning, writing, and self. This book offers insightful discussions about teaching practices, reflective writing, and digital and nondigital representations of meaning. It explores practical matters facing teachers and teacher candidates, such as communicating about one’s practice, writing beyond content and page, or conducting classroom observations and maintaining field notes. This volume is divided into three main parts, each of which spotlights a Featured Assignment that examines an area of writing in education. The sample student work that is highlighted in each chapter is designed to support teachers and teacher candidates as they consider the importance and forms of writing as professionals in the field, as well as the roles of writing in their own current or future classrooms.
Stories from the Field – Resolving Educational Leadership Dilemmas