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This volume addresses a gap in previous research and to explore Nordic textbooks chronologically and empirically from the Protestant Reformation to our present time. The chapters are written by scholars from universities in Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, countries that distinguish themselves for a rich tradition of textbook research. The authors represent different academic traditions and use a wide range of scholarly methods and perspectives. The overall objective is to highlight how textbooks reflect national educational policies and legislation. The various chapters cast light on everyday life in school and demonstrate how textbooks have contributed to nation-building and to strengthening the nations’ core values and other major political projects.

Contributors are: Karl Christian Alvestad, Norunn Askeland, Kjell Lars Berge, Peter Bernhardsson, Kerstin Bornholdt, Mads B. Claudi, Henrik Edgren, Morten Fink-Jensen, Stig Toke Gissel, Thomas Illum Hansen, Pirjo Hiidenmaa, Marthe Hommerstad, Axel Hörstedt, Kari-Anne Jørgensen-Vittersø, Tujia Laine, Esbjörn Larsson, Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund, Christina Matthiesen, Eva Maagerø, Tuva Skjelbred Nodeland, Kari H. Nordberg, Merethe Roos, Henriette Hogga Siljan, Johan Laurits Tønnesson and Janne Varjo.
Volume Editors: Kenneth Tobin and Konstantinos Alexakos
Doing Authentic Inquiry to Improve Learning and Teaching consists of 18 chapters, and 19 authors from 4 countries. The book is suited for use by educators, researchers and classroom practitioners involved in teaching and learning, teacher education, and policy. All chapters are grounded in urban contexts, but are broadly applicable. Multilogical research highlights uses of sociocultural theory, authentic, event-oriented, interpretive inquiry, narrative, and willingness to learn from difference. Methodologies are historically constituted, emergent, contingent, and participatory, embracing collaborative, and contemplative practices, and value of many voices and diverse meaning systems. Readers experience research that is potentially both personally and professionally transformative and applicable to today’s challenges.

Contributors are: Jennifer D. Adams, Konstantinos Alexakos, Arnau Amat, Marissa E. Bellino, Mitch Bleier, Corinna Yolanda Brathwaite, Olga Calderon, Katelin Corbett, Amy DeFelice, Gene Fellner, Helen Kwah, Manny Lopez, Anna Malyukova, Kate E. O'Hara, Malgorzata Powietrzyńska, Isabel Sellas, Kenneth Tobin, and Yau Yan Wong.
The genealogy of racism dates back to 610 AD when Islamic jihadists invented whiteness as a religious justification for deracinating and enslaving African people out of East Africa and into Southeastern Europe for more than 1,300 years.

Through a new interdisciplinary research methodology, Ancestorology, a taxonomy of Western cultural and visual productions of history are juxtaposed with the social stratifications of the African Diaspora to arrive at a new interpretation of the historical narrative.

Decolonzing Arts-Based Methodologies: Researching the African Diaspora provokes critical analytical thought between the historical narrative and current public discourse in Western societies where people of African descent exist. The importance of this work begins the process of unlearning Western ways of knowing and seeing through hegemonic productions of knowledge and by assigning new values to humanity’s collective memory.
Author: Romaine Logere

Abstract

One of the challenges to an increased rationalism within educational discourse has been a rethinking of mind-body relations. While there has been considerable discussion around what is implicated through the engagement of physical and theoretical sites of knowing, methodological difficulties related to how its resultant data might be meaningfully evidenced remain. Based on fieldwork conducted on a post-qualitative approach to transdisciplinary practice the author provides an account of a visual research method developed specifically to illustrate non-verbal experiences of group ideation. Writing from the position of a creative practitioner and intimate insider, the author explores how this positionality supported the role of bodily knowing in her research and the ways in which bodily experience offered utility to this research endeavour. The author concludes with a reflection on visualisation as a method to capture non-cognitive data and areas indicated through felt data for further exploration.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Maggie Haggerty

Abstract

This article draws on research conducted for the author’s PhD study and concepts in semiotic multimodality and relational materialism (; ) to explore the dynamics of what partnering with video/visual technologies in educational research with young children can be, do and become. This study was an ethnographic study which examined the curriculum and assessment priorities six focus children in Aotearoa-New Zealand encountered during their last six months in an early childhood (EC) centre and their first six months at school. In the article the author focuses on two video-recorded observations included in the PhD report by way of opening up for critical consideration the entanglements of possibility, risk and ethical responsibility entailed in the use of video in research with young children.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Author: Suzanne Culshaw

Abstract

This article presents an innovative, video-based approach to the recruitment of research participants. A YouTube video was created and uploaded as part of a doctoral study exploring what it means to be struggling as a teacher. Following a review of the recruitment literature, which highlights a general lack of attention paid to the challenges of recruitment, the author explores the approach she took in planning the video. The video was the main promotional tool for the study and was communicated via Twitter and email. She also presents online survey findings on the perceived impact and influence of the video; the visual format, informal tone and the ability to see the researcher in person were rated very positively. A reflective analysis of the video transcript follows drawing on the literature as well as the survey findings. She concludes that video-based recruitment can be an inexpensive but powerful tool which allows a human connection with the researcher early on in the research process.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies
In: Decolonizing Arts-Based Methodologies

Abstract

This article presents the specific case of video calling and desktop sharing (vcds) used in a small-scale doctoral study exploring the lesson planning processes of teachers as a result of a national curriculum change. Accessing the participants’ actions and live think-aloud exposition of their pedagogical practices also generated dialogue as new data. The study set out to explore how pedagogical content knowledge was enacted through pedagogical reasoning when participant teachers planned Computing lessons. Two central case studies captured using vcds are shared. One presents a dialogic research interview which developed a shared understanding of the impact of the curriculum change on one teacher’s practices. The second case study shows the potential of vcds to capture the verbalised thoughts and observable actions of a second teacher preparing to teach new programming skills. The video data collected provided a rich audio-visual record of the lesson planning process as it happened. This article shares the approach taken, exemplifies the data captured and reflects on vcds as a method for exploring teachers’ pedagogical reasoning. It concludes that, depending on the nature of the research question, vcds may be justified as more suitable than face-to-face, artefact-based interviews.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

This is the result of a collaborative and creative experiment, a process in which six scholars—Garcia Lazo, Locke, Rupcich, O’Connor, Yoon and Longley—agreed to co-author an article through written and/or visual pieces of work. The emphasis taken in the article is to perform a methodology of fragmentation. The article is to be read as a series of ‘folds’, where collages or fragments of text are contained and while each fold is numbered, the reader is invited to read any fold in any order. Using fragmentation as method in writing also inspired our interpretation of a body of work made up of multiple ‘folds’ from the collaborative parlour game played by the surrealist movement. Known as cadavre exquis, surrealists enjoyed the strange juxtaposition created by each artist’s contribution as they drew part of a body onto a folded piece of paper without seeing the previous drawings in each fold. While often referred to in the context of psychoanalysis, we instead emphasise the fragmentation and hybridity of this form of collaboration in order to critique of universalising narratives about education (and writing) that we consider to be at odds with the post-capitalist realities of contemporary education and life.

In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy
Educating for a Critical Consciousness
Thousands of diverse museums, including art galleries and heritage sites, exist around the world today and they draw millions of people, audiences who come to view the exhibitions and artefacts and equally importantly, to learn from them about the world and themselves. This makes museums active public educators who imagine, visualise, represent and story the past and the present with the specific aim of creating knowledge. Problematically, the visuals and narratives used to inform visitors are never neutral. Feminist cultural and adult education studies have shown that all too frequently they include epistemologies of mastery that reify the histories and deeds of ‘great men.' Despite pressures from feminist scholars and professionals, normative public museums continue to be rife with patriarchal ideologies that hide behind referential illusions of authority and impartiality to mask the many problematic ways gender is represented and interpreted, the values imbued in those representations and interpretations and their complicity in the cancellation of women’s stories in favour of conventional masculine historical accounts that shore up male superiority, entitlement, privilege, and dominance.

Feminist Critique and the Museum: Educating for a Critical Consciousness problematises museums as it illustrates ways they can be become pedagogical spaces of possibility. This edited volume showcases the imaginative social critique that can be found in feminist exhibitions, and the role that women’s museums around the world are attempting to play in terms of transforming our understandings of women, gender, and the potential of museums to create inclusive narratives.

Abstract

This chapter discusses feminist art activism and the creation of the character ‘ArtActivistBarbie,’ a fearless, feminist Barbie doll who is staged and posed in art galleries and museums to draw attention to gender representation, inequality and injustice. The work is a/r/tographic enquiry – an aesthetic, performative and critical pedagogic practice. The imaginative and creatively disruptive work of ArtActivistBarbie is explored as public pedagogy, public intellectualism and feminist ventriloquism which seeks to activate a critical feminist consciousness.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum

Abstract

Within the last decade, Canada’s national museums have endeavoured to deliver exhibitions that have a concentrated focus on women. More recently, two of Canada’s national museums launched temporary exhibitions which centred on women’s personal and professional experiences. This approach represented women’s experiences as individual and unique without juxtaposing their relationship, attachment and involvement alongside men. In these exhibitions, women’s voices, accomplishments and struggles were the intended messages, yet the output from the two museums was entirely distinct and diverse as two separate exhibits. This chapter will focus on Courage and Passion an exhibit at the Canadian Museum of Nature and World War Women at Canada’s War Museum both located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada’s capital. It will use Reilly’s “curatorial activism” to explore these two temporary exhibits which will reveal two contrasting topics which view women’s perspectives and participation in science and war. The ways in which the exhibitions engaged or (dis)engaged the visitor as a process of examination, exploration and discussion on the representation and occupation of women in museum spaces.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum

Abstract

Emerging from Spain to Senegal, Chile to Canada, Italy to Iran, this chapter illustrates the critical feminist pedagogic-activist roles Women’s Museums seek to play through physical space, mobile exhibitions, or virtual means. The work of women’s museums ranges from acquiring objects to undertaking research, from entering policy debates to bringing women curators and artists from across the globe together in conversation through the International Association of Women’s Museums (IAWM) network. Women’s museum curators and educators illuminate untold or hidden histories, creativities, experiences and voices, facilitate workshops on everything from health to gender to economics, reimagine the “dark histories” of war and domestic violence through a feminist perspective or engage in guerilla tactics and risky public practices.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum

Abstract

This chapter is situated within the complex discourses and polemical debates that surround women who wear headscarves and veils and the challenges this represents for feminism. The authors tell the story of a travelling exhibition – Cultures of Headscarves – that seeks to educate the public through a feminist intercultural understanding that positions diverse historical and contemporary practices of wearing veils and headscarves as normative to women’s cultures worldwide. Reasons for wearing these garments are also outlined within discourses of convenience, aesthetics, or religious belief, illustrating how women control and are controlled by this piece of fabric. Wading into stereotypes and other impossible situations in which women find themselves, the exhibition imaginatively and provocatively tackles narratives of patriarchal titillation, fears of “Orientalism” as well as misguided political prohibitions that tend to perpetuate anti-immigration stances. Critical to the pedagogical strength of the exhibition is the inclusion of the stories of women refracted through lenses of inter-connected personal and political determinants that ultimately bring readers to the issue of a woman’s right to choose as central to a feminist imaginary of a world that can and must be different.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum
Author: Ash Grover

Abstract

This chapter critically engages with the curatorial work of Haudenosaunee artist and creator Shelley Niro in her exhibition titled 1779, which was on display at the Art Gallery of Hamilton in Southern Ontario leading up to the 150th celebration of Canada’s confederation. The exhibition was a re-framing of the history of the land now known as Canada and provided a critical outlook on the upcoming celebrations of colonial genocide. Using the lens of feminist discourse analysis to interpret my personal learning as a settler living in Canada, I illuminate the feminist praxis in Niro’s exhibition. I argue that the pedagogical impact of her choice to juxtapose present day and historical depictions of Niagara Falls, a popular tourist landmark in Southern Ontario, serves to decolonise the discourse of the land many Canadians now inhabit.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum
Author: Lauren Spring

Abstract

When assessing gender diversity in art gallery collections, much has been written about the canonisation of works by men, the male gaze, and unbalanced sex-perspectives of our shared human past. Until recent decades much of this was taken for granted and flew under the radar and has only been brought into the light thanks to feminist critiques and interventions. One of the most unabashedly “masculine” turns throughout art history, however, has been the Italian futurist movement. Obsessed by motion and speed, and intent on glorifying violence, war and machines, futurist artists developed specific aesthetics to match the objectives laid out in their manifesto. Much of the work from this era reflects the artists’ embodied experiences fighting in WWI. One such painting, on view at the Art Gallery of Ontario, is Mer=Bataille by Gino Severini (1915). Its collage-like words of battle cries and machine gun noises attempt to provide the viewer a full-sensory glimpse into what war experience was like for Severini and others who fought alongside him. Though much has changed in military practice since 1914, the institution itself remains overwhelmingly masculine in nature. It is only in recent years that the female experience of military training, deployment, and trauma has started to come to light. For this project, researcher Lauren Spring conducted three in-depth narrative interviews with female veterans of the Canadian Armed Forces – all of whom have been diagnosed with service-related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Recurring words from these interviews, and artistic contributions from participants themselves in response to Severini’s work were combined to paint a very different, though equally as embodied, picture of the female military experience and resulting trauma.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum

Abstract

This chapter explores how the discourses of fashion in museum and gallery exhibitions operate both explicitly and implicitly as gender tools of power and privilege. Curatorial statements describe accomplishments of famous designers and couturiers, mesmerizing visitors with dreams of the impossible, the unreal. Behind these rich ornamental fashion designs are wealthy and entitled designers (largely men) who use women to maintain their superiority in these mythical worlds. Women remain nameless and functionless, existing merely as glorious adornments to a powerful male world, to be contained through clothing, expectation, and language in ways that limit, inhibit, and render them invisible.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum
Author: Monica Drenth

Abstract

This chapter is situated within a post-museum framework to explore how the Canadian Museum for Human Rights imagines itself to take up the practices of inclusion, dialogue, and critical engagement and the author’s own experience of these. She is simultaneously amazed at the museum’s structural beauty but she is equally disappointed by the ways the architecture intimates a journey of progress and hope that is at odds with ongoing societal inequity. This research demonstrates how feminist transformative learning theory can be utilised to rethink how museums are structured, how visitors experience museums, and how adult educators can apply the theory in ways that can critically engage learners in museum contexts.

In: Feminist Critique and the Museum