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This edited collection offers in seventeen chapters the latest scholarship on book catalogues in early modern Europe. Contributors discuss the role that these catalogues played in bookselling and book auctions, as well as in guiding the tastes of book collectors and inspiring some of the greatest libraries of the era. Catalogues in the Low Countries, Britain, Germany, France and the Baltic region are studied as important products of the early modern book trade, and as reconstructive tools for the history of the book. These catalogues offer a goldmine of information on the business of books, and they allow scholars to examine questions on the distribution and ownership of books that would otherwise be extremely difficult to pursue.
Print, in the early modern period, could make or break power. This volume addresses one of the most urgent and topical questions in early modern history: how did European authorities use a new medium with such tremendous potential? The eighteen contributors develop new perspectives on the relationship between the rise of print and the changing relationships between subjects and rulers by analysing print’s role in early modern bureaucracy, the techniques of printed propaganda, genres and strategies of state communication. While print is often still thought of as an emancipating and destabilizing force of change in early modern societies, the resulting picture shows how instrumental print was in strengthening existing power structures.
Focusing on literary and non-literary works alike, Interpretation and Visual Poetics in Medieval and Early Modern Texts places visual and material aspects of literary study at the center of the interpretive process. The essays in this collection explore new and traditional areas of research from hermeneutics, to codicology and history of the book, to cultures of sound and the digital humanities. They address the texts themselves, as well as their early manuscripts and subsequent printed and digital editions. The contributors collectively cover a time span of over 1000 years, and begin with the Mediterranean, focusing on texts produced in Italy and the Languedoc regions, then radiate outward to analyse the texts’ material containers (manuscripts, print, and digital editions) that are now housed worldwide.

Contributors are: Michelangelo Zaccarello, Daniel O’Sullivan, Valerio Cappozzo, Jelena Todorović, Christopher Kleinhenz, Mirko Tavoni, Isabella Magni, Francesco Marco Aresu, Dario Del Puppo, Beatrice Arduini, Giovanni Spani, Furio Brugnolo, Teodolinda Barolini, Alessandro Vettori, Marcello Ciccuto, Marco Veglia, Michael Papio, and Anthony Nussmeier.
This book attends to the most essential, lucrative, and overlooked business activity of early modern Europe: the trade of paper. Despite the well-known fact that paper was crucial to the success of printing and record-keeping alike, paper remains one of the least studied areas of early modern history. Organised into three sections, ‘Hotspots and Trade Routes’, ‘Usual Dealings’, and ‘Recycling Economies’, the chapters in the collection shed light on the practices, materials, and networks of the paper trade. Altogether, the collection uncovers the actors involved in the networks of paper production, transportation, purchase, and reuse, between the thirteenth and nineteenth centuries and across the central and peripheral papermaking regions of Europe.
This book offers a survey of the constitution of the French memoir tradition, and explores in detail the works of four representative authors: Philippe de Commynes, Louise de Savoie, Philippe de Cheverny, and François de Bassompierre. Works of self-writing were usually printed under the title of “memoirs” and have been often considered a uniform genre. These early forms of self-writing were in fact highly heterogenous works at the crossroads of multiple genres, from the account book to the astrological diary. Their writing, printing, and circulation challenge modern notions of autobiographical genres: their authorship is often questionable and collective, and they tended to be compiled in large collections for political ends, without regard to the authors’ intention.
News in Times of Conflict traces the development and spread of the newspaper and the development of the printing industry in Germany in the first half of the seventeenth century. Based on an inspection of all printed newspapers of this period, the book offers an overview over the regional and thematic reporting and the development of journalistic styles and ethics.
It offers an examination of the coverage of two major events: the death of the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus, and the execution of King Charles I of England. These case studies provide the opportunity for a comparison with the newspaper markets in France, England and the Low Countries, and with the provision of news through manuscript newsletters.
Civil War and the Emergence of a Transnational News Culture in France and the Netherlands, 1561-1598
This book explores the reception of foreign news in the late sixteenth-century civil wars in France and the Netherlands. Using a large number of French and Dutch chronicles, Baars innovatively demonstrates that the wider public was well aware of events abroad, though mutual interest in the other conflict was far from constant. She sheds new light on the connections between the Dutch Revolt and French Wars of Religion: contemporaries were gradually more inclined to see these wars as part of an international struggle. Baars argues that these times of civil war made inhabitants of both countries more experienced in distinguishing rumour from reliable rapports, stimulating the emergence of a public of critical news consumers.
Volume Editor: Alfred Hiatt
Medieval Christian European and Arabic-Islamic cultures are both notable for the wealth and diversity of their geographical literature, yet to date there has been relatively little attempt to compare medieval Christian and Islamic mapping traditions in a detailed manner. Cartography between Christian Europe and the Arabic-Islamic World offers a timely assessment of the level of interaction between the two traditions across a range of map genres, including world and regional maps, maps of the seven climes, and celestial cartography. Through a mixture of synthesis and case study, the volume makes the case for significant but limited cultural transfer.
Contributors are: Elly Dekker; Jean-Charles Ducène; Alfred Hiatt; Yossef Rapoport; Stefan Schröder; Emmanuelle Vagnon.