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The Reception of Early Flemish Paintings in the Western Art Market (1946–2015)
Working with a data set accounting for 13,000 auction sales results, Anne-Sophie V. Radermecker explores what contemporary buyers value when purchasing paintings of unknown or uncertain authorship, and which variables influence price formation mechanisms in this market segment. The principle finding of this book is not only that historical names matter in the art market, but so do all other alternative identification strategies that art market players use to label anonymous paintings. Indirect names, provisional names, and spatiotemporal designations function as substitutes for real names that simulate identities, create ex-post stories around the artworks offered for sale, and, consequently, reduce information asymmetry about an artist’s identity, with, at time, quite unexpected effects on price.
Brill’s Studies in the History of Collecting & Art Markets is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to original scholarship on the social, cultural, and economic mechanisms underlying the circulation of art. Over the last two decades interest in the formation, display, and dissolution of art collections increased tremendously; art markets, trade routes, and dealer networks became a rich field of interdisciplinary inquiry. Scholarship brought forth a lot of information about the flamboyant personalities to which the possession of art was a lifestyle; for the “social life of things”, i.e. the provenances of individual artworks, many research gaps could be closed. This shift in scholarly interest from the production side to the consumption side of the art world is also reflected in the emergence of specialized post-graduate courses offered by a number of institutions internationally, as well as an ever-increasing stream of exhibitions, conferences, and publications devoted to the subject. Brill’s book series accommodates scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and works of reference that engage in the broadly defined topic of art markets and collecting practices throughout history.


Series Editor: Gernot Wimmer
This book series takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the literature of modernity through consideration of its diverse phenomena and contexts.
While the Early Modern Era was marked in cultural-historical terms by the Renaissance, economically by the Industrial Revolution and politically by the French Revolution as well as nationalism, a first high point in modern literature was achieved by insights drawn from the natural and human sciences, foremost the fields of psychoanalysis, the quantum hypothesis, and the theory of relativity. A necessary condition for the interdisciplinary approach, therefore, in addition to the consideration of socio-cultural implications, is engagement with the history of thought, which makes the development of the Modern Era comprehensible.
This premise provides the basis for the examination of the numerous phenomena of modernity through the lens of literary texts, stemming from all applicable national literatures.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.
The beautifully illustrated Studies in Netherlandish Art and Cultural History book series was first published in 1997 as an appendix to the Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art which shares the same points of departure: the publication of art-historical and cultural-historical research into the Netherlandish visual tradition – preferably of a multi-disciplinary nature and perspective.

Manuscripts can be submitted for review to the publisher, attention of Liesbeth Hugenholtz (hugenholtz@brill.com), or to the Editors (f.scholten@rijksmuseum.nl).



Expérimentation et sémentation au XXIe siècle
Author: Claire Olivier
Dans Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint Claire Olivier s’intéresse à la manière dont l’écrivain, cinéaste, photographe et plasticien Jean-Philippe Toussaint, expérimente la puissance des images pour composer en ce début du XXIe siècle une œuvre singulière fondée sur des relations transesthétiques. Elle s’attache à montrer que les écritures toussaintiennes, quel que soit le médium choisi, sont visuelles. Elles donnent à voir, à penser, à rêver et composent un « essai-image ». Ce dernier constitue une forme toujours en devenir qui s’appuie sur un processus de « sémentation », néologisme qui désigne une véritable alchimie du signe où le sens est continuellement réactivé par des contextualisations différentes. Sur le mode de l’opera operta, cet « essai-image » toussaintien déploie ses séductions réflexives comme romanesques.

In Les écritures de l'image par Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Claire Olivier is concerned with the way the writer, filmmaker, photographer and plastic artist Jean-Philippe Toussaint experiments with the power of images to create, in the 21st century, a singular work based on transaesthetic relationships. She endeavours to demonstrate that toussaintian writings are visual, independently from the chosen medium. They allow to see, think, dream and compose an “image-essay”. The latter forms a shape always in the making, relying on a “sémentation” process, neologism designating a true sign alchemy where the meaning is constantly revived through different contextualisations. On the model of the opera operta, this toussaintian “image-essay” deploys its reflective seductions as novelistic.
Experimental forms in Argentina, 1955-1968
Author: Elize Mazadiego
Dematerialization and the Social Materiality of Art reconceptualizes mid-twentieth-century avant-garde practices in Argentina with a focus on the changing material status of the art object in relation to the country’s intense period of modernization. Elize Mazadiego presents Oscar Masotta’s notion of dematerialization as a concept for interpreting experimental art practices that negated the object’s primacy, while identifying their promise within the sociopolitical transformations of the 1950s and 1960s. She argues that, in abandoning the traditional art object, the avant-garde developed new materialities rooted in Buenos Aires’ changing social life. A critical examination of art’s materiality and its social role within Argentina, this important study paves the way for broader investigations of postwar Latin American art.