Konstitution sowie Destitution von Subjekten ist auf die strukturbildende Kraft von Szenen angewiesen. Welche inszenatorischen Elemente sind an Bildung und Destabilisierung, ja Auslöschung des Subjekts beteiligt? Welches Wissen wird darin produziert?
In einem interdisziplinären Ansatz konturiert der Band das Verhältnis von Wahrnehmung und Wissen, Politik und szenischer Öffentlichkeit entlang der Schwerpunkte Tribunal, Folter und künstlerischen Verfahren der Selbstverletzung. So wie Tribunale an der Schnittstelle von Rechtsperformanz und Theatralität operieren, ist in der Folter die Verletzung des Subjekts Teil eines Gefüges aus Geheimhaltung, Offenbarung, Mitwisserschaft. Eperimentell erprobte und szenisch aufgeführte Desubjektivierung in künstlerischen Verfahren zeigen kulturelle und gesellschaftliche Restriktionen ebenso wie Vorstellungen über das Subjekt und dessen Grenzen.
Editor: Andrew Weaver
A Companion to Music at the Habsburgs Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, edited by Andrew H. Weaver, is the first in-depth survey of Habsburg musical patronage over a broad timeframe. Bringing together existing research and drawing upon primary sources, the authors, all established experts, provide overviews of the musical institutions, the functions of music, the styles and genres cultivated, and the historical, political, and cultural contexts for music at the Habsburg courts. The wide geographical scope includes the imperial courts in Vienna and Prague, the royal court in Madrid, the archducal courts in Graz and Innsbruck, and others. This broad view of Habsburg musical activities affirms the dynasty’s unique position in the cultural life of early modern Europe.
Author: Li Guo
This handbook aims mainly at an analytical documentation of all the known textual remnants and the preserved artifacts of Arabic shadow theatre, a long-lived, and still living, tradition — from the earliest sightings in the tenth century to the turn of the twentieth century. The book consists of three main parts and a cluster of appendixes. Part One presents a history of Arab shadow theatre through a survey of medieval and premodern accounts and modern scholarship on the subject. Part Two takes stock of primary sources (manuscripts), published studies, and the current knowledge of various aspects of Arabic shadow theatre: language, style, terminology, and performance. Part Three offers an inventory of all known Arabic shadow plays. The documentation is based on manuscripts (largely unpublished), printed texts (scripts, excerpts), academic studies (in Arabic and Western languages), journalist reportage, and shadow play artifacts from collections worldwide.
Travellers and Trendsetters, 1870-1970
Destination for artists and convalescents, playground of the rich, site of foreign allure, the French Riviera has long attracted visitors to its shores. Ranging through the late nineteenth century, the Belle Epoque, the ‘roaring twenties’, and the emancipatory post-war years, Rosemary Lancaster highlights the contributions of nine remarkable women to the cultural identity of the Riviera in its seminal rise to fame. Embracing an array of genres, she gives new focus to feminine writings never previously brought together, nor as richly critically explored. Fiction, memoir, diary, letters, even cookbooks and choreographies provide compelling evidence of the innovativeness of women who seized the challenges and opportunities of their travels in a century of radical social and artistic change.
Social Dynamics of Turbulent Theatrical Events
Since the beginning of theatre history, scandals have taken place and the variety of causes, processes and types of interactions makes them an interesting object of study. Theatre scandals often indicate clashes with a dominant ideology or with the ideology of a particular group in society. Sometimes, following a scandal, the attacked ideology changes and incorporates the possibility of the aesthetics or themes that caused the clash. In this way, scandals can cause dynamic changes within cultural systems.
Next to theoretical considerations the contributors, all members of the IFTR Theatrical Event Working Group, present in their various case studies a wide cultural and chronological diversity of theatre scandals, all of which were experienced as very shocking moments in theatre history.
Arts education research in Canada has increased significantly since the beginning of this century. New forms of arts-based research, such as ethnodrama and a/r/t/ography, have arisen and made significant contributions to the literature. Researchers in departments/schools/faculties of dance, drama, music, visual arts, media studies, cultural studies and education have been successful in acquiring peer-reviewed grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council to undertake large-scale projects and disseminate the findings internationally. The purpose of this edited collection, entitled Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2: Issues and Directions, is to provide an overview of the current research undertaken across the country, thereby providing a valuable resource for students, professors and research associates working in the arts disciplines, media studies, education, and cultural studies.

Contributors are: Bernard W. Andrews, Kathy Browning, Ranya Essmat Saad, Maia Giesbrecht, Shelley M. Griffin, Rita Irwin, Glenys McQueen-Fuentes, Laura Nemoy, Lori Lynn Penny, Jennifer Roswell, Michelle Searle, Alison Shields, Anita Sinner, Darlene St. Georges, Peter Vietgen, John L. Vitale, Jennifer Wicks, Kari-Lynn Winters, and Thibault Zimmer.
Authors: Alison Shields and Rita Irwin

Abstract

Upon reviewing eleven dissertations completed during the last decade (2006–2016) in The University of British Columbia’s art education program, this chapter addresses the following questions: (1) What are the qualities of art making and how does art making function within arts-based research?; (2) How is art making used to investigate educational issues?; and (3) How is art making reflected in the dissertation structure? This chapter posits that arts-based research is uniquely situated within qualitative research, calling scholars to reflexively and reflectively consider their relations to artistic forms of inquiry. In looking forward, we anticipate PhD research will continue to provoke the boundaries of research leading to new forms of engagement and enhanced understandings of educational phenomena.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

This inquiry examined teacher perspectives on artist involvement in an integrated arts professional development program for elementary and secondary practitioners. Findings indicate that engagement in cross-curricular activities with professional artists employing a constructivist approach fostered a change in teacher beliefs about arts pedagogy. The participants indicated a preference for an integrated approach to arts instruction rather than the traditional, differentiated model which emphasizes separate arts disciplines. Teachers reported that the artists’ focus on personal creativity developed their innate artistic abilities. This enabled them to understand their students’ arts experiences and value diversity in learning. The offering of the program in Canada’s national cultural venues motivated the teachers to learn, stimulated their creativity, contextualized the learning, and instilled a sense of purpose for arts education. The integrated arts approach promoted the teachers’ cognitive and emotional development, enabled them to explore independent, self-directed learnings, fostered awareness of the interconnectedness of arts forms, and reinforced cross-curricular instruction through the arts. Such findings suggest that professional artists helping teachers to learn to teach the arts on-site through an integrated arts approach is a viable model of teacher development for improving arts instruction.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2

Abstract

Our chapter unfolds as a métissage of five distinct research strands in art education where we weave together visual and literary expressions in what is often called the intimate practice of life writing. Stories open spaces to consider when is research, as a gesture that shifts thinking to movements, and to stories as sources of information that offer aesthetic, experiential, embodied, intellectual and emotional ways of knowing. In this conversation, the application of stories as a method of inquiry begins with our first strand, which questions whose voices and bodies need to be considered in curricular encounters during workshops conducted at the Heeum Comfort Women Museum in South Korea. In this case, art-making actions and dialogues raise questions about historical and cultural hegemonic practices. Questions of indigenous identity are then advanced in a self-study about in-between social and cultural boundaries that asks, “How indigenous am I?” and “Who gets to decide?” Proceeding to curricular intensities we turn our attention to differences, and visual life writing with photography to explore the diaspora of Egyptian Jews in Canada. Turning to just and caring notions of learning and teaching, the stories of ‘at-risk’ students in an inner-city high school in Montreal emerge as integral to visual art practice. Our final exemplar of storying research materialises as collaborative a/r/tography, where social fiction and multisensory art production maps transatlantic familial maritime histories. We braid our reflective vignettes from each individual research story to demonstrate the application of stories as part of our ongoing conceptualization of practice through creative expression. Our research stories are introduced as pedagogic pivots, demonstrating how stories operate as a vernacular method that is an accessible, artful form of expression.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2
Author: Laura Nemoy

Abstract

Arts and humanities programming is becoming increasingly incorporated in the medical school, balancing the biomedical paradigm, and nurturing human and emotional qualities and understandings in medical students. Music is often listed among these arts and humanities disciplines; yet there exists an acknowledged gap in the literature pertaining to musical activities and programming in the medical school, despite the prevalence of choirs, a cappella groups, small instrumental ensembles, and musical theatre programs in medical schools. This chapter presents an overview of the landscape of music research in medical education, beginning with a background and description of the medical humanities concept, followed by a summary of the representation of music in medical humanities and medical education literature. The chapter concludes with a brief discussion and suggestions for areas of future research. Within the medical humanities, music has been tied to metaphors of “medicine as a performing art” or “the art of listening,” but very little literature exists delving into the actual musical experiences of medical students. Literature on choirs, musical ensemble, and community music suggests that choral singing can cultivate many of the intra and interpersonal skills that medical humanities programming encourages, such as empathy, self-awareness, human connection, and wellness. With the prevalence and accessibility of music groups (in particular vocal ensembles) in medical schools, it is viable and important to demonstrate through continued research that the value of music in medical education extends beyond metaphor and therapy, and suggests profound potential in shaping the becoming of compassionate physicians.

In: Perspectives on Arts Education Research in Canada, Volume 2