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The Uses of Archaeological Heritage in the Caribbean
What is the role of local Caribbean individuals and communities in creating and perpetuating archaeological heritage? How has archaeological knowledge been integrated into education plans in different countries? This book aims to fill a gap in both archaeological scholarship and popular knowledge by providing a platform for local Caribbean voices to speak about the archaeological heritage of their region. To achieve this, each chapter of the book focuses on identifying and developing strategies that academics, heritage practitioners, and non-scholars from the insular Caribbean can adopt to stimulate a necessary dialogue on how archaeological heritage is used and produced on various academic, political, and social levels.

Contributors are: Katarina Jacobson, Eldris Con Aguilar, Irvince Nanichi Auguiste, Arlene Álvarez, Lornadale Charles, Cameron Gill, Victoria Borg O’Flaherty, Andrea Richards, Debra Kay Palmer, Jerry Michel, Laurent Ursulet, Matthieu Ecrabet, Pierre Sainte-Luce, Lisette Roura Alvarez, Kevin Farmer, Tibisay Sankatsing Nava, Harold Kelly, Stacey Mac Donald, Raymundo Dijkhoff, Ashleigh John Morris, Kara M. Roopsingh, Zara Ali, Wilhelm Londoño Díaz.
Author:
In the 13th century, the monarchs of the Přemyslid dynasty, whose territory overlapped with that of the present-day Czech Republic, were increasingly affected by the dismal state of the Crown's finances. As a result, the Přemyslids initiated intensive silver exploitation, among other means to ensure income. This book's objective, based on interdisciplinary research, is therefore to describe and present the structure of mining and metallurgical areas in the kingdom of Bohemia, as well as to examine and identify how ore mining and metallurgy shaped and interacted with settlement organization and the medieval landscape.
Volume Editor:
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology, A.D. 284-650, across the late antique world, from Catalonia to Cappadocia. The first volume includes an overview of research, and papers exploring bioarchaeology, mortuary rituals, mausolea, and funerary landscapes. It considers the sacralisation of tombs, movements of relics, and the political significance of cemeteries. The fate of statue monuments is explored, as memorials for individuals. Authors also compare the spoliation or preservation of tombs to other buildings, and, finally, how the city itself, with its monuments, served as a place of collective memory, where meanings were long maintained.
The second volume includes papers exploring all aspects of funerary archaeology, from scientific samples in graves, to grave goods and tomb robbing and a bibliographic essay. It brings into focus neglected regions not usually considered by funerary archaeologists in NW Europe, such as the Levant, where burial archaeology is rich in grave good, to Sicily and Sardinia, where post-mortem offerings and burial manipulations are well-attested. We also hear from excavations in Britain, from Canterbury and London, and see astonishing fruits from the application of science to graves recently excavated in Trier.
Volume Editor:
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology, A.D. 284-650, across the late antique world, from Catalonia to Cappadocia. This first volume includes an overview of research, and papers exploring bioarchaeology, mortuary rituals, mausolea, and funerary landscapes. It considers the sacralisation of tombs, movements of relics, and the political significance of cemeteries. The fate of statue monuments is explored, as memorials for individuals. Authors also compare the spoliation or preservation of tombs to other buildings, and, finally, how the city itself, with its monuments, served as a place of collective memory, where meanings were long maintained.
Volume Editors: and
Burial and Memorial explores funerary and commemorative archaeology A.D. 284-650, by region. This second volume includes papers exploring all aspects of funerary archaeology, from scientific samples in graves, to grave goods and tomb robbing and a bibliographic essay. It brings into focus neglected regions not usually considered by funerary archaeologists in NW Europe, such as the Levant, where burial archaeology is rich in grave good, to Sicily and Sardinia, where post-mortem offerings and burial manipulations are well-attested. We also hear from excavations in Britain, from Canterbury and London, and see astonishing fruits from the application of science to graves recently excavated in Trier.
Editor-in-Chief:
Monumenta Graeca et Romana (MGR) is a peer-reviewed series concerned with the study of material and visual culture of the Greek and Roman world, chronologically ranging from later prehistory to Late Antiquity – i.e. from the middle of the second millennium BCE to the late first millennium CE. Geographically, the series covers Western Europe to the Near East, from the Black Sea to North Africa. The series publishes monographs and anthologies, as well as analytical catalogues raisonés of material in the collections of museums and other public institutions. It also publishes monographs or edited volumes that offer cohesive surveys of specific objects, types of monuments, or regions in Mediterranean and classical archaeology (in the widest possible sense). The survey format is flexible but authors should aim to be as inclusive as possible in their coverage and approaches, designing each volume to be a useful starting point for scholars and students into a new area of research. Additionally, a new subseries, MGR New Directions in Mediterranean Archaeology, is established in 2023 and will publish volumes with an explicit theoretical or methodological agenda. All MGR volumes may be published in all Open Access formats that Brill offers. All volumes, whether traditionally published or in Open Access, can be accompanied by additional data or documentation available on an online repository hosted by Brill. The language of MGR and its subseries is English.
This series offers art-historical and interdisciplinary approaches to how art was conceived, produced, and received across Europe, from the early medieval to the early modern. It pays particular attention to the social, cultural, religious, and political history of the period as seen through contemporary visual and material culture.

The series is interested in all areas of European artistic life in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Work in the series explores art forms such as painting, sculpture, architecture, textiles, glass, metalwork, ceramics, ephemera, spatial strategies, and more. Themes of study may include emotions, the senses, devotional practices, the environment, animals, bodies, otherness, religious and social changes, literacy (written and visual), protest, and issues of class, race, and gender, to name only a few. Interdisciplinary, multidisciplinary, and comparative work is also warmly welcomed. The series publishes monographs, edited thematic collections, and reference works.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editors, Professor Sarah Blick and Professor Laura D. Gelfand or the Publisher at Brill, Dr Kate Hammond.

Brill is in full support of Open Access publishing and offers the option to publish your monograph, edited volume, or chapter in Open Access. Our Open Access services are fully compliant with funder requirements. We support Creative Commons licenses. For more information, please visit Brill Open or contact us at openacess@brill.com.
The European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology (EAAA) is the main academic society for Asian art and archaeology in Europe. It is an international, voluntary, independent, non-governmental and non-profit academic organization representing professional art historians, archaeologists, researchers, students and anyone interested in Asian art and archaeology from across Europe and beyond. The book series European Studies in Asian Art and Archaeology (EAAA) aims to publish in-depth, peer-reviewed scholarly contributions on topics relevant to Asian Art and Archaeology that treat these in a wider Asian context. The series endeavors to analyze and interpret the artistic and cultural heritage of ancient, modern and contemporary social realities in Asian societies, and to contribute in this way to a deeper understanding of the cultural, philosophical, political, sociological, religious and ideological values of Asia as a whole. The EAAA series' goal is to publish innovative research that will have a lasting impact by opening new research questions, which will help trace new theoretical and methodological pathways in the field of art history.

If you are working on a book that would be suitable for this series, please do not hesitate to contact Acquisitions Editor Teddi Dols (Teddi.Dols@brill.com).
The prestigious MDP series, started in 1899, has published excavation reports of various sites of ancient Iran as well as studies on the archaeological material excavated there. The present continuation of this series will pursue these same aims on an international level.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.
Author:
This book surveys and analyzes changes in religious groups and identities in late antique Arabia, ca. 300-700 CE. It engages with contemporary and material evidence: for example, inscriptions, archaeological remains, Arabic poetry, the Qurʾān, and the so-called Constitution of Medina. Also, it suggests ways to deal with the later Arabic historiographical and other literary texts. The issue of social identities and their processes are central to the study. For instance, how did Arabian ethnic and religious identities intersect on the eve of Islam? The book suggests that the changes in social groups were more piecemeal than previously thought.